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(Science Alert)   A very cool way for Gummy Bears to teach your kids genetics. Here comes the candy science   (sciencealert.com) divider line
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839 clicks; posted to STEM » on 16 Jan 2021 at 7:54 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



8 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2021-01-16 8:07:59 PM  
....which reminds me, I need to go buy a case of toilet paper and a dozen plungers.
 
2021-01-16 9:34:27 PM  
Melt them and spread on biscuits, yum.
 
2021-01-16 9:49:16 PM  
Despite Medel's fame very few, frankly almost none, genetic traits follow Mendel's "laws". Most traits involve the interactions of multiple genes oe alleles as well as epigenetic and environmental factors. Mendelian trees are useless for tracing complex genetic traits.

/used to work on complex genetic diseases
/beta tested the first gene sequencing chips
/got out before CRISPR
/get off my sequencing gel
 
2021-01-16 10:07:58 PM  

taintbaggins: Despite Medel's fame very few, frankly almost none, genetic traits follow Mendel's "laws". Most traits involve the interactions of multiple genes oe alleles as well as epigenetic and environmental factors. Mendelian trees are useless for tracing complex genetic traits.

/used to work on complex genetic diseases
/beta tested the first gene sequencing chips
/got out before CRISPR
/get off my sequencing gel


Got a recommended text book for a physicist who wants to learn about genetics but doesn't know a ribosome from a protein?
 
2021-01-16 10:33:25 PM  

Glorious Golden Ass: taintbaggins: Despite Medel's fame very few, frankly almost none, genetic traits follow Mendel's "laws". Most traits involve the interactions of multiple genes oe alleles as well as epigenetic and environmental factors. Mendelian trees are useless for tracing complex genetic traits.

/used to work on complex genetic diseases
/beta tested the first gene sequencing chips
/got out before CRISPR
/get off my sequencing gel

Got a recommended text book for a physicist who wants to learn about genetics but doesn't know a ribosome from a protein?


I would tell you to start with probability and statistics but being a physicist you're already too smart to fall for that trap.

For context I suggest The Gene by Mukerjee. For a real text I think you first need to pick up a good general biology text to use as a reference. You cannot understand the applications of genetics without understanding the components of living systems. E.O. Willson's biology textbook is outstanding. For a more nose to the grindstone genetics text a lot of people will suggest Pierce, Conceptual Genetics but I have always preferred Klug, Essentials of Genetics.

Normally I would tell you that a used edition a few years old would be fine but a book that doesn't cover CRISPR and epigenetics isn't worth buying.
 
2021-01-16 11:08:20 PM  

taintbaggins: Glorious Golden Ass: taintbaggins: Despite Medel's fame very few, frankly almost none, genetic traits follow Mendel's "laws". Most traits involve the interactions of multiple genes oe alleles as well as epigenetic and environmental factors. Mendelian trees are useless for tracing complex genetic traits.

/used to work on complex genetic diseases
/beta tested the first gene sequencing chips
/got out before CRISPR
/get off my sequencing gel

Got a recommended text book for a physicist who wants to learn about genetics but doesn't know a ribosome from a protein?

I would tell you to start with probability and statistics but being a physicist you're already too smart to fall for that trap.

For context I suggest The Gene by Mukerjee. For a real text I think you first need to pick up a good general biology text to use as a reference. You cannot understand the applications of genetics without understanding the components of living systems. E.O. Willson's biology textbook is outstanding. For a more nose to the grindstone genetics text a lot of people will suggest Pierce, Conceptual Genetics but I have always preferred Klug, Essentials of Genetics.

Normally I would tell you that a used edition a few years old would be fine but a book that doesn't cover CRISPR and epigenetics isn't worth buying.


Thank you!  Yep, plenty of statistics and probability.  My career has exposed me to gross biology, but nothing smaller than a cell and receptors as gross concepts.
 
2021-01-17 4:07:22 AM  
It's a shame how many teenagers master "complex genetics" in high school but are never awarded with so much as a master's degree for their effort.
 
2021-01-17 9:02:58 AM  

Glorious Golden Ass: taintbaggins: Despite Medel's fame very few, frankly almost none, genetic traits follow Mendel's "laws". Most traits involve the interactions of multiple genes oe alleles as well as epigenetic and environmental factors. Mendelian trees are useless for tracing complex genetic traits.

/used to work on complex genetic diseases
/beta tested the first gene sequencing chips
/got out before CRISPR
/get off my sequencing gel

Got a recommended text book for a physicist who wants to learn about genetics but doesn't know a ribosome from a protein?


As a physicist, I took a summer off to teach myself genetics from Snustad and Simmons, which is good but outdated these days...
 
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