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(Medical Xpress)   Inhibiting kidney-type glutaminase-dependent glutaminolysis in mice can lead to elimination of senescent cells. Researchers tumescent   (medicalxpress.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Enzyme, Adenosine triphosphate, Cancer, Bacteria, Senescence, Death, Metabolism, Radical  
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356 clicks; posted to STEM » on 15 Jan 2021 at 7:12 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



7 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2021-01-15 6:01:18 PM  
This has to do with fapping, right?
 
2021-01-15 8:11:24 PM  
As my uncle always said about these types of studies, "You are not a mouse."
 
2021-01-15 8:18:28 PM  
Cells are described as senescent when they lose the ability to divide.

I use the same standard for whole humans.
 
2021-01-15 8:19:55 PM  

Spermbot: As my uncle always said about these types of studies, "You are not a mouse."


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2021-01-16 1:59:01 AM  

Spermbot: As my uncle always said about these types of studies, "You are not a mouse."


Yeah.  Show me it works in squirrels and makes their long lives longer, not something that is elderly at two years.
 
2021-01-16 1:06:24 PM  

SwiftFox: Spermbot: As my uncle always said about these types of studies, "You are not a mouse."

Yeah.  Show me it works in squirrels and makes their long lives longer, not something that is elderly at two years.


Why squirrels?  Why not foxes?
 
2021-01-16 1:16:49 PM  

Spermbot: As my uncle always said about these types of studies, "You are not a mouse."


The article says

"The researchers suggest that inhibiting a similar enzyme in humans could likely promote senescent cell death as well, and by extension, reduce age-related disease. "

and I'm not sure how to take that.  By "similar" do they mean "the same"?

Genes for Glutaminase do exist (both GLS1 kidney-type and GLS2 liver-type) in humans and GLS1 has already be implicated in at least helping to fuel the growth of certain cancer cells.  "High GLS1 expression is associated with poor prognosis in human cancers"

It sounds to my under-educated receptors that suppressing GLS1 (kidney-type Glutaminase) expression in humans could be a win-win for both cancer treatment and against senescent cell populations.
 
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