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(New Scientist)   "Dammit Bill, I told you you can't eat your hot wings in the lab...wait a second, that's odd"   (newscientist.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Electron, Light, Energy, Electric charge, Solar cells, Solar cell, Photovoltaics, Sun  
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2243 clicks; posted to STEM » on 15 Jan 2021 at 1:05 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



32 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-01-15 12:39:30 PM  
Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?
 
2021-01-15 1:07:19 PM  
Uhhum, Subby.  That would be "Dammit Qinye,..."
 
2021-01-15 1:09:55 PM  
"solar cells made with lead-based materials " [...] "It is our priority to select sustainable forest-based biomaterials," says Bao. "Capsaicin is low-cost, natural, sustainable and Earth-abundant."

But lead isn't.
 
2021-01-15 1:21:11 PM  

WoolyManwich: Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?


Relieve my hemorrhoids?
 
2021-01-15 1:26:11 PM  
Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.
 
2021-01-15 1:26:56 PM  

bughunter: WoolyManwich: Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?

Relieve my hemorrhoids?


https://senvie.com/blogs/senvie/cayen​n​e-pepper-hemorrhoids-reviews
 
2021-01-15 1:29:51 PM  

bughunter: WoolyManwich: Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?

Relieve my hemorrhoids?


Relive, yes.  Relieve?  Not so sure.
 
2021-01-15 1:32:51 PM  

I Like Bread: Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.


Isn't the discover of sodium saccharine pretty much the inverse of that?

Or was that aspartame?
 
2021-01-15 1:40:57 PM  

bughunter: I Like Bread: Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.

Isn't the discover of sodium saccharine pretty much the inverse of that?

Or was that aspartame?


Maybe it was Post-It notes.
 
2021-01-15 1:48:09 PM  

SansNeural: "solar cells made with lead-based materials " [...] "It is our priority to select sustainable forest-based biomaterials," says Bao. "Capsaicin is low-cost, natural, sustainable and Earth-abundant."

But lead isn't.


This. WTF.
 
2021-01-15 1:56:38 PM  

SansNeural: bughunter: WoolyManwich: Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?

Relieve my hemorrhoids?

Relive, yes.  Relieve?  Not so sure.


Yeah.  Gonna go with a great big NOPE on putting Dave's Insanity Sauce on my 'roids.

NOPE.

WoolyMan can be the early adopter for that one.
 
2021-01-15 1:59:42 PM  
It does wonders for blue meth
 
2021-01-15 2:40:40 PM  

SansNeural: "solar cells made with lead-based materials " [...] "It is our priority to select sustainable forest-based biomaterials," says Bao. "Capsaicin is low-cost, natural, sustainable and Earth-abundant."

But lead isn't.


Lead is all of those except "sustainable", and I don't think we're likely to run out any time soon. Source it from recycled car batteries if you need to add some "green" points.
 
2021-01-15 3:07:05 PM  

Ivo Shandor: SansNeural: "solar cells made with lead-based materials " [...] "It is our priority to select sustainable forest-based biomaterials," says Bao. "Capsaicin is low-cost, natural, sustainable and Earth-abundant."

But lead isn't.

Lead is all of those except "sustainable", and I don't think we're likely to run out any time soon. Source it from recycled car batteries if you need to add some "green" points.


You have one new voicemail from East Los Angeles.
 
2021-01-15 3:15:09 PM  

bughunter: I Like Bread: Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.

Isn't the discover of sodium saccharine pretty much the inverse of that?

Or was that aspartame?


7 Discoveries Scientists Made by Licking Things
Youtube BL6ehwqaawU
 
2021-01-15 3:17:58 PM  

SMB2811: bughunter: I Like Bread: Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.

Isn't the discover of sodium saccharine pretty much the inverse of that?

Or was that aspartame?

[17 ads viewed by CLICKING THINGS]


Hmmm.
 
2021-01-15 3:26:25 PM  
Way back in the day I worked with a small IC design shop. Every few months their yields would go down to nothing for a while and they could never figure out why. Turns out the night cleaning crew was baking cookies in the chip fab oven.
 
2021-01-15 3:35:43 PM  
They tested the capsaicin-treated solar cells in the laboratory by exposing them to artificial light to simulate sunlight  . . .

It's a shame that real sunlight is so scarce.
 
2021-01-15 3:36:28 PM  

SMB2811: bughunter: I Like Bread: Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.

Isn't the discover of sodium saccharine pretty much the inverse of that?

Or was that aspartame?

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/BL6ehwqa​awU]


OK, both.

And don't forget that chronic insulin resistance is named diabetes mellitus because classical era physicians tasted people's pee...

CSB:  Had a coworker who once came back from a trip to Italy and say, "I'm gonna marry an Italian woman.  I met this girl over there and her p*ssy was sweet!"

I thought for a second and said, "Is she diabetic?"

He called her, and asked.  And yes, she is.  Type 1.

I said, "Well, you better marry that one, then."

/he did
//CSB
 
2021-01-15 3:37:10 PM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: They tested the capsaicin-treated solar cells in the laboratory by exposing them to artificial light to simulate sunlight  . . .

It's a shame that real sunlight is so scarce.


Artificial light emitting known wavelengths at known intensities can be a little more... predictable.
 
2021-01-15 3:55:33 PM  
Anybody with kids knows hot sauce helps the lead paint chips go down.

/(what?)
 
2021-01-15 4:10:16 PM  

I Like Bread: Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.


That's how most science goes down.

"The key point in scientific discovery is not 'eureka' but 'huh that's funny'."
 
2021-01-15 11:47:09 PM  

SansNeural: Creepy Lurker Guy: They tested the capsaicin-treated solar cells in the laboratory by exposing them to artificial light to simulate sunlight  . . .

It's a shame that real sunlight is so scarce.

Artificial light emitting known wavelengths at known intensities can be a little more... predictable.


Yes, and it's how you can calculate the conversion efficiency, but you still need real world testing

I helped build the solar car that won the 1995 World Solar Rally, even though it was in the 'junior' class (agricultural grade solar cells and lead acid batteries) .... but we had come in 4th in the Sunrayce, because we had never tested the car for an extended period of time in full sun (our lab was under the ramp of a parking garage... 4 floors below ground)

The array for the Sunrayce was assembled using conductive epoxy... which wasn't rated for use on aluminum.  After enough time in the sun, aluminum oxide formed so we basically had a resistor between each cell.  By the time of the race, we were lucky to get 600W in full sun.   Other teams were getting 1500-1800W.   We only did as well as we did because on cloudy days, we got more power (about 700W) while others got less than their typical.

For the World Solar Rally, we stripped panels down and soldered together our second string cells.  (Efficiency varied, so we had like 3x what we needed, but had measured each cell and used the best ones in the first array)
 
2021-01-16 1:43:20 AM  
"Frank's Red Hot - I put that shiat on *everything*!"
 
2021-01-16 1:54:02 AM  

bughunter: WoolyManwich: Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?

Relieve my hemorrhoids?


Have you tried to apply it directly on said problem area?
 
2021-01-16 6:09:35 AM  

Sim Tree: I Like Bread: Funny thing is, if you know scientists, you know that's pretty much how it went down. Some dork was working through his lunch break and got sticky fingers all over the testing samples.

That's how most science goes down.

"The key point in scientific discovery is not 'eureka' but 'huh that's funny'."


Quickly followed by 'I wonder if it does that every time?'
 
2021-01-16 8:10:45 AM  
"I'VE NEVER SEEN A MAN EAT SO MANY CHICKEN WINGS!"

/"Ahhhhhhhh!"
 
2021-01-16 8:59:59 AM  
We had a "break it guy" in our R&D.  We'd design something and give it to him to break.  We had a problem with these two phase coils breaking due to ice pressure.  I built a new one that I was positive would compensate for the expansion.

A week or so later he comes back and one of the tubes was broken at the tube sheet.  Not only did it fail it failed in its strongest spot.  WTF?

As he walked out of my office he said, "I had to hit it with a hammer"

Dude took his job seriously.
 
2021-01-16 10:47:25 AM  

bughunter: SansNeural: bughunter: WoolyManwich: Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?

Relieve my hemorrhoids?

Relive, yes.  Relieve?  Not so sure.

Yeah.  Gonna go with a great big NOPE on putting Dave's Insanity Sauce on my 'roids.

NOPE.

WoolyMan can be the early adopter for that one.


They still sell that?
We used to do shots of that in high school.

/old as fark now, am stuck to eating bland things like Tabasco and Sriracha (Tabasco-flavored ketchup)
 
2021-01-16 11:24:58 AM  

WoolyManwich: Hot sauce: is there anything it can't do?


Maybe the sun likes hot sauce??
 
2021-01-16 12:06:57 PM  

Oneiros: The array for the Sunrayce was assembled using conductive epoxy... which wasn't rated for use on aluminum.


Yours is a very interesting story and thank you for sharing (no snark here).

I (hope I) would have been very suspicious of both epoxy and aluminum as conductors, especially for power applications.  By your solar car timeframe I was aware of the debacle of home builders in the '70s switching to aluminum for wiring to avoid the high cost of copper.  I think it was used as an example in my Materials Science class at the U (I had an excellent professor!).

And to my knowledge, epoxy as a conductor is still a compromise between the typical insulating properties of a good adhesive and holding conductive particles in dense enough suspension to be useful.

Of course hindsight analysis is easy, but it would have been wise to make a small segment of solar array to place in the sun in parallel with construction of the vehicle.
 
2021-01-16 10:31:51 PM  

SansNeural: Oneiros: The array for the Sunrayce was assembled using conductive epoxy... which wasn't rated for use on aluminum.

Yours is a very interesting story and thank you for sharing (no snark here).

I (hope I) would have been very suspicious of both epoxy and aluminum as conductors, especially for power applications.  By your solar car timeframe I was aware of the debacle of home builders in the '70s switching to aluminum for wiring to avoid the high cost of copper.  I think it was used as an example in my Materials Science class at the U (I had an excellent professor!).

And to my knowledge, epoxy as a conductor is still a compromise between the typical insulating properties of a good adhesive and holding conductive particles in dense enough suspension to be useful.

Of course hindsight analysis is easy, but it would have been wise to make a small segment of solar array to place in the sun in parallel with construction of the vehicle.


I knew about the aluminum wiring issue because we lived in a house with it for a year, but I don't think anyone ever explained to me why it was bad and what the actual physical/chemical process was

I always assumed that it was a mild thermocouple , so if you push power across it you risk it heating up

But for the solar car, we actually had a few different metals In the solar array. The cells were cut near the inside edge of the bus bars, so each cut cell had a single bar on one side.  The electrical engineer on the project soldered a thin mesh into that (which I think was silver), so they could shingle the cells so the exposed surface was all PV with no bars.  The mesh was then epoxied to the next cell in series

I remember there being some sort of troweling of the epoxy, but I wasn't involved what that part (I did more composite parts, and building plugs and molds to make the composite parts.  And converting chase vehicles.  And pulling trailers).  So I don't know if they put epoxy down first, then the mesh, or just relied on it seeping through the mesh

iat actually wouldn't surprise me if they were just incompetent. I got yelled at for cold solder joints as I decided to help with the backup control board, and they had problems with cold solder joints.  But it turned out it wasn't the board I did... it was the advisor who was pretty sloppy in soldering

We had other issues that we didn't have time to fix.  Like our canopy that had distortions in it, so only the REALLY short people (5'4") had a decent view.  I was supposed to be a backup driver, but at 5'8, my head was into the distorted area.  And trying to slide down resulted in my foot triggering the kill switch that they required us to install during the preliminary testing before the race.  (They didn't like that we had cruise control, and insisted that any pressure on the brake pedal shut off the motor), but that extra switch gave me even less space)
 
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