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(Telegraph)   Carnival unveils £1billion petri-dish   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line
    More: Sick, Cruise ship, Ship, spectacular new ships, Mardi Gras, Emeril Lagasse, Cruise line, Holland America Line, Mobile, Alabama  
•       •       •

725 clicks; posted to Business » on 15 Jan 2021 at 1:22 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



10 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-01-15 12:37:08 PM  
My parents took cruises from 2007-2015. Each year they took one they came back sicker and sicker. One year it was a three week flu bug and the next year shingles. The last time they were sick for about six weeks.

F*ck that noise.
 
2021-01-15 12:43:43 PM  
That doesn't look like fun. I don't like crowds. I prefer nature. I don't drink or eat that much. What am I missing?
 
2021-01-15 1:28:39 PM  

edmo: That doesn't look like fun. I don't like crowds. I prefer nature. I don't drink or eat that much. What am I missing?


I don't either, but this marketing professor has an idea:  https://www.profgalloway.com/c​arniviru​s

Rookie marketers make the mistake of thinking choice is a good thing. Choice is a tax on your time and attention. Consumers don't want more choice, but more confidence in the choices presented. Customers want someone else to do the research and curate the options for them. You could try to merchandise a better itinerary on a boat through Southeast Asia (hotels, meals, activities, planes, trains, cars), or you could let someone else figure it out for you.

TL:DR - Cruises take all the risk out of travel.  You won't make a mistake.  You won't book a lousy hotel, you won't eat a weird meal, you won't run into an uncomfortable situation... etc.  That's what a lot of travelers are looking for.  When cruisers try to sell me on cruising, the universal thing I zoom in on without them saying it is that they don't have to make a lot of decisions.  They get on a boat, they get a drink, and they don't have to do anything else - especially make decisions which are a mental tax that they don't want to pay on their day off.
 
Xai [TotalFark]
2021-01-15 1:30:45 PM  
Man that must have been the most awkward launch ever, being the company executive in charge of that launch that you knew full well nobody wanted.
 
2021-01-15 2:21:27 PM  

Rapmaster2000: edmo: That doesn't look like fun. I don't like crowds. I prefer nature. I don't drink or eat that much. What am I missing?

I don't either, but this marketing professor has an idea:  https://www.profgalloway.com/ca​rnivirus

Rookie marketers make the mistake of thinking choice is a good thing. Choice is a tax on your time and attention. Consumers don't want more choice, but more confidence in the choices presented. Customers want someone else to do the research and curate the options for them. You could try to merchandise a better itinerary on a boat through Southeast Asia (hotels, meals, activities, planes, trains, cars), or you could let someone else figure it out for you.

TL:DR - Cruises take all the risk out of travel.  You won't make a mistake.  You won't book a lousy hotel, you won't eat a weird meal, you won't run into an uncomfortable situation... etc.  That's what a lot of travelers are looking for.  When cruisers try to sell me on cruising, the universal thing I zoom in on without them saying it is that they don't have to make a lot of decisions.  They get on a boat, they get a drink, and they don't have to do anything else - especially make decisions which are a mental tax that they don't want to pay on their day off.



Choice paralysis is a real thing.  Half of Trader Joe's business model is about removing choice paralysis.
 
2021-01-15 2:29:16 PM  

FrancoFile: Rapmaster2000: edmo: That doesn't look like fun. I don't like crowds. I prefer nature. I don't drink or eat that much. What am I missing?

I don't either, but this marketing professor has an idea:  https://www.profgalloway.com/ca​rnivirus

Rookie marketers make the mistake of thinking choice is a good thing. Choice is a tax on your time and attention. Consumers don't want more choice, but more confidence in the choices presented. Customers want someone else to do the research and curate the options for them. You could try to merchandise a better itinerary on a boat through Southeast Asia (hotels, meals, activities, planes, trains, cars), or you could let someone else figure it out for you.

TL:DR - Cruises take all the risk out of travel.  You won't make a mistake.  You won't book a lousy hotel, you won't eat a weird meal, you won't run into an uncomfortable situation... etc.  That's what a lot of travelers are looking for.  When cruisers try to sell me on cruising, the universal thing I zoom in on without them saying it is that they don't have to make a lot of decisions.  They get on a boat, they get a drink, and they don't have to do anything else - especially make decisions which are a mental tax that they don't want to pay on their day off.


Choice paralysis is a real thing.  Half of Trader Joe's business model is about removing choice paralysis.


That makes sense why their stores are so small and they have so few SKUs.
 
2021-01-15 2:34:57 PM  
I've only been on one cruise in the past but want to go on more.  My wife & I were planning on one for this year because she finally got enough vacation days where she works to take a full week off in cold months for a cruise, a week off for our standard summer vacation and 5 days spread around the rest of the year.  Then COVID hit last year and we canceled all plans.  Maybe in 2022 we will look for a trip, but we might wait till 2023 just to make sure everything is safe.
The thing I liked about the cruise was that you got to see several places on one trip, without moving hotels since the hotel room moved with you.  On the cruise I took we went to several tropical ports & I've been back to one of them for a full vacation since then.  Think of cruising like your local buffet place, they give you a taste of a lot of things that you might not want a full meal of, if you like something now you know and can go back their again.  The crowds on the ship I was on wasn't too bad, the biggest crowd was in the adults only pool area, and that's mainly because it was a very small area.
 
2021-01-15 2:49:21 PM  

SpeakY2K: I've only been on one cruise in the past but want to go on more.  My wife & I were planning on one for this year because she finally got enough vacation days where she works to take a full week off in cold months for a cruise, a week off for our standard summer vacation and 5 days spread around the rest of the year.  Then COVID hit last year and we canceled all plans.  Maybe in 2022 we will look for a trip, but we might wait till 2023 just to make sure everything is safe.
The thing I liked about the cruise was that you got to see several places on one trip, without moving hotels since the hotel room moved with you.  On the cruise I took we went to several tropical ports & I've been back to one of them for a full vacation since then.  Think of cruising like your local buffet place, they give you a taste of a lot of things that you might not want a full meal of, if you like something now you know and can go back their again.  The crowds on the ship I was on wasn't too bad, the biggest crowd was in the adults only pool area, and that's mainly because it was a very small area.


The Hawaii cruise I took a few years ago was like that. I got to see the sights on all of the islands without much effort. The ship mostly sailed at night so you had the whole day for shore stuff.
 
2021-01-15 3:02:53 PM  
MMMM just imagine the sheer number of self-serve buffets that thing has.

/barf
 
2021-01-15 3:16:18 PM  

Rapmaster2000: FrancoFile: Rapmaster2000: edmo: That doesn't look like fun. I don't like crowds. I prefer nature. I don't drink or eat that much. What am I missing?

I don't either, but this marketing professor has an idea:  https://www.profgalloway.com/ca​rnivirus

Rookie marketers make the mistake of thinking choice is a good thing. Choice is a tax on your time and attention. Consumers don't want more choice, but more confidence in the choices presented. Customers want someone else to do the research and curate the options for them. You could try to merchandise a better itinerary on a boat through Southeast Asia (hotels, meals, activities, planes, trains, cars), or you could let someone else figure it out for you.

TL:DR - Cruises take all the risk out of travel.  You won't make a mistake.  You won't book a lousy hotel, you won't eat a weird meal, you won't run into an uncomfortable situation... etc.  That's what a lot of travelers are looking for.  When cruisers try to sell me on cruising, the universal thing I zoom in on without them saying it is that they don't have to make a lot of decisions.  They get on a boat, they get a drink, and they don't have to do anything else - especially make decisions which are a mental tax that they don't want to pay on their day off.


Choice paralysis is a real thing.  Half of Trader Joe's business model is about removing choice paralysis.

That makes sense why their stores are so small and they have so few SKUs.


One part of their philosophy is "We are purchasing agents for our customers".  I.e., don't leave it up to the customer to figure out what the best chocolate pudding is: find the best chocolate pudding you can for the money and stock that one.
 
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