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(Burlington County Times)   Student produces a uranium-glazed plate to prove his Geiger counter works. Show-and-tell immediately evacuated   (burlingtoncountytimes.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Uranium, Dangerous goods, New Jersey, Nuclear power, Police, Camden County, New Jersey, Camden, New Jersey, Ceramic glaze  
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5782 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jan 2021 at 12:17 AM (22 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-01-08 6:05:40 PM  
These are teachers, as in actually teaching young people to be adults. Where the everloving f*ck, do these geniuses think a kid might obtain a harmful amount of radioactive uranium? How about taking two seconds to think, before evacuating an entire school, and alerting the pentagon. One part of being an adult, is knowing the appropriate response to situations. These teachers failed.
 
2021-01-08 6:11:57 PM  
That's just stupid.

Both uranium-glaze and uranium glass is perfectly safe for short exposure.
don't eat or drink from them on a weekly basis and it is all good..

Unlike the  radium girls. But they didn't know better due to lack of info.
 
2021-01-08 6:45:13 PM  
If he'd broken a CFL they would declare the school a super fund site.
 
2021-01-08 8:07:54 PM  
If only they had a device to verify that it was safe.  Maybe the student who brought the plate should have...oh...wait a minute.  Perhaps they needed a physics teacher then?  Or someone with access to the internet?
 
2021-01-08 8:56:38 PM  

blender61: That's just stupid.

Both uranium-glaze and uranium glass is perfectly safe for short exposure.
don't eat or drink from them on a weekly basis and it is all good..

Unlike the  radium girls. But they didn't know better due to lack of info.


This.  Fiestaware is perfectly safe to handle.  I forget the exact dosage but it's something like a hundredth of a mrem per hour.  On top of that it's mostly alpha particles at energies which have a penetration depth of a couple of the top layers of skin.  The only way it would be remotely dangerous would be if you ground up the plate and swallowed or inhaled the dust.

potierrh: If only they had a device to verify that it was safe.  Maybe the student who brought the plate should have...oh...wait a minute.  Perhaps they needed a physics teacher then?  Or someone with access to the internet?


Depending on the gain setting, most Geiger counters can make a noise that is alarming to somebody who doesn't know how to use a Geiger counter when you put it next to one of those plates.  It is too bad there wasn't a science teacher there.  If I was, that kid would have got an A for that.
 
2021-01-08 8:58:08 PM  
Wait till they find out about bananas.
 
2021-01-08 9:03:05 PM  
i159.photobucket.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-08 9:13:48 PM  

Lambskincoat: Where the everloving f*ck, do these geniuses think a kid might obtain a harmful amount of radioactive uranium?


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/David​_​Hahn was unavailable for comment.
 
2021-01-08 9:24:27 PM  

Forty-Three: blender61: That's just stupid.

Both uranium-glaze and uranium glass is perfectly safe for short exposure.
don't eat or drink from them on a weekly basis and it is all good..

Unlike the  radium girls. But they didn't know better due to lack of info.

This.  Fiestaware is perfectly safe to handle.  I forget the exact dosage but it's something like a hundredth of a mrem per hour.  On top of that it's mostly alpha particles at energies which have a penetration depth of a couple of the top layers of skin.  The only way it would be remotely dangerous would be if you ground up the plate and swallowed or inhaled the dust.

potierrh: If only they had a device to verify that it was safe.  Maybe the student who brought the plate should have...oh...wait a minute.  Perhaps they needed a physics teacher then?  Or someone with access to the internet?

Depending on the gain setting, most Geiger counters can make a noise that is alarming to somebody who doesn't know how to use a Geiger counter when you put it next to one of those plates.  It is too bad there wasn't a science teacher there.  If I was, that kid would have got an A for that.


this. maybe the problem was it says he brought in "a piece of the plate" -perhaps the teacher was smart enough to worry about dust from the shattered plate? but dumb enough to then over react?

because even in this case, it's an insane over reaction, unless the kid was actively pulverizing the plate in front of a fan, he left the dust at home, where he (for some weird reason) broke it.

if fiestaware was dangerous enough to evacuate entire buildings over, they wouldn't sell it in random antique shops and thus expose their own staff....
 
2021-01-08 9:25:20 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Incredibly useful chart. Most things are radioactive. Damn few are radioactive enough to worry about.
 
2021-01-08 9:26:50 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-08 9:31:02 PM  
"Correction: An earlier version of this story quoted a student who provided a false name. The quote has been removed."

Gene Masseth, at it again
 
2021-01-08 9:57:17 PM  

Lambskincoat: These are teachers, as in actually teaching young people to be adults. Where the everloving f*ck, do these geniuses think a kid might obtain a harmful amount of radioactive uranium? How about taking two seconds to think, before evacuating an entire school, and alerting the pentagon. One part of being an adult, is knowing the appropriate response to situations. These teachers failed.


They don't think. That's why they can't teach kids to think. It's beyond them.
 
2021-01-08 10:17:19 PM  
See. The only controversy here is between people who disagree on HARMFUL AMOUNT.

Virtually any amount of uranium is DETECTABLE. That is why the kid put it on his plate. And why not?

Unfortunately, standards used by governments and various ...concerned scientists.... show no safe level of radiation exposure. THey are perfectly comfortable scaring the bejeesuz out of ignorant and gullible people with horror stories and fear mongering. Fukushima has been an important life lesson for me. The same hysteria whipped up about Fukushima rears its head in US elections, COVID response, conspiracy theories, wearing masks, the Tesla and Bitcoin bubbles, etc. People are being led by the nose and are being herded by fear. They embrace huge risks, but shun situations that represent no risk at all. You can see it everywhere.

I see no way out of it other than education over a long term. Reason. Rationality. Not CONCERN and WORRY and WHAT IF and "Let's watch out for the poor people of x at any cost."

Fark, by and large, has a MUCH higher ratio of reasonable thoughtful people than the real world.
 
2021-01-08 10:29:13 PM  

2fardownthread: Virtually any amount of uranium is DETECTABLE. That is why the kid put it on his plate. And why not?


For clarity, it's Fiestaware. The kid didn't glaze the plate. The plate was glazed when it was manufactured. Fiestaware is moderately collectable, and fun to run a Geiger counter over if you happen to have one. I wouldn't use it as my regular table setting, but it's mostly harmless.

I'm pretty shocked that no adult knew about Fiestaware.
 
2021-01-08 10:55:47 PM  

2fardownthread: Unfortunately, standards used by governments and various ...concerned scientists.... show no safe level of radiation exposure.


There might be no safe amount of radiation, but there are negligible amounts of it.

"No safe amount" means that they have a model showing (e.g.) a 10% chance of cancer at 10,000 units of exposure and a 40% chance of cancer at 40,000 units. Extrapolate that line and you conclude that the only "safe" (0% risk) exposure is 0. But do you really care about an exposure of 0.001 units?

If the additional dose from a science fair project is less than the background from cosmic rays, granite countertops, leftover 1960s weapons-test fallout, and the carbon and potassium in your own body then who gives a fark?
 
2021-01-08 11:01:50 PM  

luna1580: this. maybe the problem was it says he brought in "a piece of the plate" -perhaps the teacher was smart enough to worry about dust from the shattered plate? but dumb enough to then over react?

because even in this case, it's an insane over reaction, unless the kid was actively pulverizing the plate in front of a fan, he left the dust at home, where he (for some weird reason) broke it.

if fiestaware was dangerous enough to evacuate entire buildings over, they wouldn't sell it in random antique shops and thus expose their own staff....


Could be.  It's been some years since I've had to take rad. safety training, but I do recall having to be especially vigilant/terrified when it came to radioactive dust.  Your internal organs don't have the same level of shielding that your skin has, and hypothetically, an alpha source that would be safe to hold in your hand for years with no measurable risk, could also easily kill you if pulverized and inhaled.

That said, for the uranium glaze it's probably only an issue if you're working in a factory that makes Fiestaware, so, yeah, major overreaction.
 
2021-01-08 11:39:44 PM  

2fardownthread: See. The only controversy here is between people who disagree on HARMFUL AMOUNT.

Virtually any amount of uranium is DETECTABLE. That is why the kid put it on his plate. And why not?

Unfortunately, standards used by governments and various ...concerned scientists.... show no safe level of radiation exposure. THey are perfectly comfortable scaring the bejeesuz out of ignorant and gullible people with horror stories and fear mongering. Fukushima has been an important life lesson for me. The same hysteria whipped up about Fukushima rears its head in US elections, COVID response, conspiracy theories, wearing masks, the Tesla and Bitcoin bubbles, etc. People are being led by the nose and are being herded by fear. They embrace huge risks, but shun situations that represent no risk at all. You can see it everywhere.

I see no way out of it other than education over a long term. Reason. Rationality. Not CONCERN and WORRY and WHAT IF and "Let's watch out for the poor people of x at any cost."

Fark, by and large, has a MUCH higher ratio of reasonable thoughtful people than the real world.


That's...not true.  Not true at all.  You seem to be making the common mistake of conflating the safety of individual and incidental radiation exposures with occupational exposures and environmental contamination.  Sure, you do sometimes see stories in the popular press that go overboard with the "OMG RADIASHUN!" alarmist, but that's at least in part because radiation health physics (which also includes a lot of biology) is a rather complicated field.

It's not always easy to communicate why X is "safe" while Y is not, but I can assure you that the career scientists/civil servants that write the nitty gritty of the standards and regs most certainly know what they are talking about

/Source: used to be a radiation tech worker for the gub'ment
 
2021-01-09 12:25:26 AM  

Lambskincoat: These are teachers, as in actually teaching young people to be adults. Where the everloving f*ck, do these geniuses think a kid might obtain a harmful amount of radioactive uranium? How about taking two seconds to think, before evacuating an entire school, and alerting the pentagon. One part of being an adult, is knowing the appropriate response to situations. These teachers failed.


Counterpoint: Cody's Lab, the late radioactive boy scout.
 
2021-01-09 12:25:32 AM  

luna1580: Forty-Three: blender61: That's just stupid.

Both uranium-glaze and uranium glass is perfectly safe for short exposure.
don't eat or drink from them on a weekly basis and it is all good..

Unlike the  radium girls. But they didn't know better due to lack of info.

This.  Fiestaware is perfectly safe to handle.  I forget the exact dosage but it's something like a hundredth of a mrem per hour.  On top of that it's mostly alpha particles at energies which have a penetration depth of a couple of the top layers of skin.  The only way it would be remotely dangerous would be if you ground up the plate and swallowed or inhaled the dust.

potierrh: If only they had a device to verify that it was safe.  Maybe the student who brought the plate should have...oh...wait a minute.  Perhaps they needed a physics teacher then?  Or someone with access to the internet?

Depending on the gain setting, most Geiger counters can make a noise that is alarming to somebody who doesn't know how to use a Geiger counter when you put it next to one of those plates.  It is too bad there wasn't a science teacher there.  If I was, that kid would have got an A for that.

this. maybe the problem was it says he brought in "a piece of the plate" -perhaps the teacher was smart enough to worry about dust from the shattered plate? but dumb enough to then over react?

because even in this case, it's an insane over reaction, unless the kid was actively pulverizing the plate in front of a fan, he left the dust at home, where he (for some weird reason) broke it.

if fiestaware was dangerous enough to evacuate entire buildings over, they wouldn't sell it in random antique shops and thus expose their own staff....


The chem teacher at my HS would bring out his orange Fiestaware and tell the story about how he ate on it all through college before they found out it was radioactive.  One of the most popular and amazing teachers in that school district.  I have a pitcher and salt/pepper shakers on my book shelf right now.  It's not a big deal, like at all...

/Now they did evacuate my HS because they found a 5 oz sealed glass bottle of bromide.  But that's a whole other story.
 
2021-01-09 12:26:40 AM  
That's the stupidest overreaction I've ever seen. Reminds me of the tales of people calling in a HAZMAT team because or a broken fluorescent tube that contained some mercury.
 
2021-01-09 12:26:47 AM  
so dumb,

we had a box with several fiestaware pieces in our highschool science lab for decades
 
2021-01-09 12:26:53 AM  
science teacher should be tarred, feathered and fired for that. wtf
/radioactive glassware is farking cool
 
2021-01-09 12:27:12 AM  
Sounds like someone needs a written exam on radiation and radiation safety, with a good whack on the arse with a heavy cane for every wrong answer. And it ain't the kid.
 
2021-01-09 12:30:37 AM  
Yeah, Big Deal. The teacher is an idiot and should not be teaching science.
 
2021-01-09 12:33:38 AM  

Forty-Three: blender61: That's just stupid.

Both uranium-glaze and uranium glass is perfectly safe for short exposure.
don't eat or drink from them on a weekly basis and it is all good..

Unlike the  radium girls. But they didn't know better due to lack of info.

This.  Fiestaware is perfectly safe to handle.  I forget the exact dosage but it's something like a hundredth of a mrem per hour.  On top of that it's mostly alpha particles at energies which have a penetration depth of a couple of the top layers of skin.  The only way it would be remotely dangerous would be if you ground up the plate and swallowed or inhaled the dust.

potierrh: If only they had a device to verify that it was safe.  Maybe the student who brought the plate should have...oh...wait a minute.  Perhaps they needed a physics teacher then?  Or someone with access to the internet?

Depending on the gain setting, most Geiger counters can make a noise that is alarming to somebody who doesn't know how to use a Geiger counter when you put it next to one of those plates.  It is too bad there wasn't a science teacher there.  If I was, that kid would have got an A for that.


There's the problem. Radioactive alpha particles could turn the school's beta cucks into alpha males. Then there's risk of contamination from toxic masculinity.
 
2021-01-09 12:34:27 AM  
Tell those geniuses about what's in some smoke detectors.
 
2021-01-09 12:34:56 AM  
In a previous life I worked in a nuclear reactor laboratory for several years. We spent a great deal of effort putting thick lead shields around our equipment, not to keep radiation in, but to keep the high farking background radiation levels out. I remember when my boss had a heart scan done at the hospital and then came in to work and set off our radiation alarms from the hallway. Also, a good way to get your geiger counter a clicking is to blow up a party balloon and rub it on your head to charge it up. Then wave it around for at least five minutes. Slowly deflate it and put it in front of the detector. It's charged so it collects dust and deflating it concentrates it further. And yes, everything, including the dust in the air is radioactive.
 
2021-01-09 12:35:41 AM  
Better not tell them about smoke detectors, granite decay, lantern mantles (the good ones) old watches that glow at night and oh, yeah.....the sun.
 
2021-01-09 12:38:39 AM  
Correction: An earlier version of this story quoted a student who provided a false name. The quote has been removed.

Mike Hunt strikes again!
 
2021-01-09 12:38:52 AM  
luna1580:

if fiestaware was dangerous enough to evacuate entire buildings over, they wouldn't sell it in random antique shops and thus expose their own staff....

I don't know, man. I spend a lot of time in antique shops and yeah, a lot of Fiestaware - but they also very often have Jarts! Do you have any idea how dangerous Jarts are? Think of their staff!
 
2021-01-09 12:40:14 AM  
Ha....about a mile from where I went to high school
 
2021-01-09 12:43:26 AM  
Don't tell them about the smoke detectors.  There's americium-241 in there.  They will have to leave the school forever!
 
2021-01-09 12:44:29 AM  
*kicks door in*

NUCLEAR PEDANT TIME.

It's not GEIGER COUNTER, for a variety of reasons. The first of them being, it's Geiger-Muller. It's the Geiger-Muller region of the gas amplification curve. ALL meters that operate in that part of the curve are GM meters.

Fark user imageView Full Size

Second being, WORDS HAVE MEANING.

A counter is typically a static piece of equipment that counts a fixed piece of media, like a nucon smear or an air filter. And they aren't generally GM equipment! They might be gas filled, but your gas filled counters are going to be proportional or something. The smaller ones are in fact SCINTILLATION meters, which is a whole other kettle of fish.

So it's not a Geiger Counter. Both words are wrong. And if it's a plate? DEFINITELY not a counter.

It's probably a GM Frisker.

....

And this farkers is when I actually clicked on the article, hoping to find out what kind of meter it was, only to find out the student brought FARKING FIESTAWARE TO SCHOOL.

FIESTAWARE. That mass consumer product that is now a very collectible antique! I HAVE TWO PIECES. FFS.

Fark user imageView Full Size


/error 404 brain not found
 
2021-01-09 12:44:40 AM  

Lambskincoat: These are teachers, as in actually teaching young people to be adults. Where the everloving f*ck, do these geniuses think a kid might obtain a harmful amount of radioactive uranium? How about taking two seconds to think, before evacuating an entire school, and alerting the pentagon. One part of being an adult, is knowing the appropriate response to situations. These teachers failed.


Exactly. I hope this ignorant fark never puts a Colman lantern mantle on their undeveloped film.
 
2021-01-09 12:46:03 AM  
Idjits.
 
2021-01-09 12:46:55 AM  
I used a uranium glass orange juicer.
When North Korea threatened to nuke the USA, I got a cheap Geiger counter to plug into my iPhone. The juicer set off the Geiger counter in a big way, so I packaged it in a box and put it in the garbage.
I know smoke detectors are radioactive too but they are necessary to watch for smoke from sources.

Alcohol infused post.
May you live in interesting times it said.
Fark.
 
2021-01-09 12:47:06 AM  
Anyway, this is a counter:

Fark user imageView Full Size


This is a fancy modern pancake frisker:

Fark user imageView Full Size


And here's an old school brick frisker:

Fark user imageView Full Size


/your radiation detection equipment
//know it, love it
 
2021-01-09 12:47:20 AM  
I want to start collecting Vaseline glass.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-01-09 12:47:40 AM  
There are nuclear reactors at both my alma maters, and no one's freaking out over those. Well, actually people are freaking out all the time, but no one knows what to do about it. The editor at the Oregonian, "Hey, it's been a while since we freaked people out about Reed College."
 
2021-01-09 12:50:09 AM  
When I was in 8th grade I took a field trip to Sandia National Labs to see the inside of a reactor and to Los Alamo's to witness the firing of a particle accelerator.

This school went on lockdown to a small amount of background radiation on common dinnerware.
 
2021-01-09 12:51:02 AM  
The anti-intellectual bullshiat in this country is no longer surprising.
 
2021-01-09 12:52:41 AM  

Ivo Shandor: 2fardownthread: Unfortunately, standards used by governments and various ...concerned scientists.... show no safe level of radiation exposure.

There might be no safe amount of radiation, but there are negligible amounts of it.

"No safe amount" means that they have a model showing (e.g.) a 10% chance of cancer at 10,000 units of exposure and a 40% chance of cancer at 40,000 units. Extrapolate that line and you conclude that the only "safe" (0% risk) exposure is 0. But do you really care about an exposure of 0.001 units?

If the additional dose from a science fair project is less than the background from cosmic rays, granite countertops, leftover 1960s weapons-test fallout, and the carbon and potassium in your own body then who gives a fark?


I've often wondered whether people born in the 1950s or later are mutants from all the Strontium 90, Cesium 135 and other goodness left over in the biosphere from nuclear weapons tests. There's no way to prove or disprove this, particularly since the overload of chemicals we've been absorbing from food and plastics would also have the ability to induce changes in the brain and internal organs.

Y'all have a nice day now, y'heah?
 
2021-01-09 12:53:39 AM  
With an education system full of morons like this it pretty much explains how 50% of a population not only voted for Trump but thought he won.
 
2021-01-09 12:56:32 AM  
artelectronicmedia.comView Full Size


wwhspawprint.comView Full Size


2.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size
 
2021-01-09 12:56:46 AM  

RolandTGunner: If he'd broken a CFL they would declare the school a super fund site.


Funny thing is though, they probably wouldn't.  It's all about familiarity.  Smoke detectors?  Broken CFL's?  Bananas? Not a worry.

But... someone brought a uh, umm, "Fiestaware(?)" plate to school?!  EVERYBODY PANIC!
 
2021-01-09 12:56:54 AM  

revrendjim: Wait till they find out about bananas.


The overwhelming number of funnies gives me a sad.

/dont think the potassium will gitcha?
 
2021-01-09 12:58:22 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Younger: I'm so nuclear I met my future self, I think I'll stop with these tests and just make meth.
Older: Oops again!
present:.
 
2021-01-09 12:58:52 AM  

SpeedyBB: Ivo Shandor: 2fardownthread: Unfortunately, standards used by governments and various ...concerned scientists.... show no safe level of radiation exposure.

There might be no safe amount of radiation, but there are negligible amounts of it.

"No safe amount" means that they have a model showing (e.g.) a 10% chance of cancer at 10,000 units of exposure and a 40% chance of cancer at 40,000 units. Extrapolate that line and you conclude that the only "safe" (0% risk) exposure is 0. But do you really care about an exposure of 0.001 units?

If the additional dose from a science fair project is less than the background from cosmic rays, granite countertops, leftover 1960s weapons-test fallout, and the carbon and potassium in your own body then who gives a fark?

I've often wondered whether people born in the 1950s or later are mutants from all the Strontium 90, Cesium 135 and other goodness left over in the biosphere from nuclear weapons tests. There's no way to prove or disprove this, particularly since the overload of chemicals we've been absorbing from food and plastics would also have the ability to induce changes in the brain and internal organs.

Y'all have a nice day now, y'heah?


That's okay, they weren't worried. All the tetraethyl lead kept them from thinking on the matter too deeply.
 
2021-01-09 1:00:25 AM  

Forty-Three: The only way it would be remotely dangerous would be if you ground up the plate and swallowed or inhaled the dust.


Well crap.

There goes my weekend.
 
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