Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Phys Org2)   Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to freeze the ice. Then you must examine the ice. Then you must discuss the examination of the ice   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Hero, Water, Atom, Ion, Chemistry, Evaporation, Electron, such approaches, international team of researchers  
•       •       •

684 clicks; posted to STEM » on 11 Dec 2020 at 4:20 PM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



7 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-12-11 5:05:24 PM  
This business is math and physics WAY over my humble head. Can anybody explain what this means to science and what kind of benefit can we render from the acquired data?
 
2020-12-11 5:22:56 PM  
I've been watching Mission Impossible, the original series not the shiatty 80's abortion, pretty much non-stop for a few weeks since Pluto TV created a channel dedicated to it. It's on right now, so kicking it is.
 
2020-12-11 8:08:01 PM  
"ice formed from high-purity deuterated water (hard water)"


Mmmm, doesn't the Fine Science Writer mean "heavy water"?  Hard water, in my experience, is quite another thing and not often used in science experiments outside the topic of "how can we purify this nasty stuff?"
 
2020-12-11 8:09:52 PM  
MellowMauiMan:
Can anybody explain what this means to science and what kind of benefit can we render from the acquired data?

No.
 
2020-12-12 12:30:56 PM  
AKA Bokononism?
 
2020-12-12 1:59:15 PM  
n-ice?
 
2020-12-13 12:47:29 AM  

SansNeural: MellowMauiMan:
Can anybody explain what this means to science and what kind of benefit can we render from the acquired data?

No.


There's several benefits.

One of my tasks at the South Pole was to study ways to freeze ice and capture an
Optical Module for the IceCube experiment.

The importance was this:  if we can freeze ice as a single crystal around the module, we avoid scatter and deflection, and the accuracy of our giant neutrino telescope increases.

Further, as ice grinds through its phase shifts going from 80c down to -90C, how much fracturing or shifting takes place?  We didn't know what it would do to such precise measurements, with such sensitive equipment. So we tested it during my 1-year stay.

Interestingly, the ice only got down to -65C, despite surface temps around -90C, and windchills below -120C.  And all of the modules froze pretty evenly, and deflection was below detectable threshold for almost everything, except one that had Frozen badly, and that detail helped us avoid further problems during deployment of the deeper modules.

A failure is often a gold-mine of information in a good experiment.  And it proved true, there.
 
Displayed 7 of 7 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.