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(SoraNews24)   Have a break? Have a Kit Kat that has been aged in whisky barrels from Islay, Scotland   (soranews24.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Wine, whisky barrels, cacao nibs, Whisky Barrel Aged, land of unusual KitKats, unforgettable limited-edition KitKat, high-end KitKat Chocolatory boutique, new chocolate  
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733 clicks; posted to Food » on 05 Dec 2020 at 6:35 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2020-12-05 9:06:29 AM  
12 votes:

OrionXVI: I don't get it.  Chocolate turns chalky and brittle with age.  Why would you ever age it?  Is food supposed to taste better if it's made in a bizarre, obscure manner?


RTFA - the cacao nibs are aged in the barrels before becoming chocolate.
 
2020-12-05 9:23:57 AM  
3 votes:
Of all the Scotch regions, Islay would be the last I'd choose for chocolate.  That iodine flavor from seaweed peat would clash terribly with chocolate.
 
2020-12-05 9:21:39 AM  
3 votes:

Jesus McSordid: I wonder what it is that makes people like whisky. It's probably not genetic, because both of my parents enjoyed a dram, but to me it tastes putrid, and the peaty, smoky ones are the worst. I had a tasting at  the Tallisker distillery on the Isle of Skye last year, and it was about what I expected, but others in the room thought that it was nectar.

Oddly though, if you blend small quantities of a moderately priced whisky with chocolate, magic happens, so I could possibly be on board with this.


Yes. Bourbon balls FTW.

There's another recipe that whisky makes better. I got this from a restaurant on Edisto Island. You marinade pork tenderloin medallions in duck stock, honey, molasses, and whisky. Then, heat the tenderloins to around 145 degrees. Then serve with a sauce of the same ingredients that your marinade was made from + cream.

The restaurant closed some years back. [tears of lament]

It's common practice among our family to share restaurant fare around the table. The first time I got the pork dish I was like a cheetah trying to defend my kill from hyenas.

I don't mean to endorse one product over another, but the dish amazingly tastes better with the Jack Daniels that the restaurant recipe calls for. I've tried it with bourbon, but though it's tasty, it just isn't the same.
 
2020-12-05 6:53:54 AM  
3 votes:
I don't get it.  Chocolate turns chalky and brittle with age.  Why would you ever age it?  Is food supposed to taste better if it's made in a bizarre, obscure manner?
 
2020-12-05 9:04:12 AM  
2 votes:
I would love to try that, but I'm stuck in America, where we strive to make our junk food trashier instead of lifting it up. I'll have to console myself with a package of Special Edition Tide Pod Oreos.
 
2020-12-05 2:48:20 PM  
1 vote:

Jesus McSordid: I wonder what it is that makes people like whisky. It's probably not genetic, because both of my parents enjoyed a dram, but to me it tastes putrid, and the peaty, smoky ones are the worst. I had a tasting at  the Tallisker distillery on the Isle of Skye last year, and it was about what I expected, but others in the room thought that it was nectar.

Oddly though, if you blend small quantities of a moderately priced whisky with chocolate, magic happens, so I could possibly be on board with this.


Add a little bourbon to your chocolate chip cookies. Amazing.

And I was once of similar thinking. Then a buddy graciously shared a nip of his King George V from Johnny Walker. Smoke, wood, leather, tobacco...The smoothness and complexity hooked me. Now I can't afford a $750 bottle of hooch myself, but I've been chasing that flavor profile ever since. Islay whisky is the closest.
 
2020-12-05 6:36:32 AM  
1 vote:
I wonder what it is that makes people like whisky. It's probably not genetic, because both of my parents enjoyed a dram, but to me it tastes putrid, and the peaty, smoky ones are the worst. I had a tasting at  the Tallisker distillery on the Isle of Skye last year, and it was about what I expected, but others in the room thought that it was nectar.

Oddly though, if you blend small quantities of a moderately priced whisky with chocolate, magic happens, so I could possibly be on board with this.
 
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