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(NBC News)   NOT NEWS: "Drug kingpin" goes on the lam for 35 years, assuming the identity of a dead infant born in 1955. NEWS: Passport renewal catches and fingerprints confirm his identity. FARK: He doesn't face any drug charges, just passport fraud   (nbcnews.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Indictment, Howard Farley Jr., Federal agents, Fraud, Jury, Federal investigators, Complaint, Farley's time  
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2531 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Dec 2020 at 9:19 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



35 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-12-04 9:22:17 PM  
I guess he gets to start using his real name for identification purposes again, which is nice. I suppose.
 
2020-12-04 9:23:47 PM  
Private plane?

Crime does pay folks.
 
2020-12-04 9:25:46 PM  
Statute of limitations, baby.
 
2020-12-04 9:25:48 PM  
Who among us hasn't seen that done in a movie and thought "I should have an alias, just in case."?
 
2020-12-04 9:26:03 PM  
My first question is, how old is the Vietnamese woman he is living with?
 
2020-12-04 9:28:29 PM  
The passport fraud charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

10 Years seems a little harsh for basically making a fake ID
 
2020-12-04 9:32:47 PM  

Crewmannumber6: Who among us hasn't seen that done in a movie and thought "I should have an alias, just in case."?


that was one of many old school methods of new identity, which was cheap and easy for a long time. passports and out of country travel was truly pushing the limits. things got ugly after 9-11. this farker got used to having it too easy for too long.
 
2020-12-04 9:35:17 PM  
Did he happen to own an antique shop on Hudson Street?
 
2020-12-04 9:39:23 PM  

abhorrent1: The passport fraud charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

10 Years seems a little harsh for basically making a fake ID


Everything is worse when it's a federal offense.
 
2020-12-04 9:42:38 PM  
Randall Stevens?
 
2020-12-04 9:57:41 PM  

abhorrent1: The passport fraud charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

10 Years seems a little harsh for basically making a fake ID


Given how many things hinge on IDs being correct, having a brutal punishment for faking one is appropriate.
 
2020-12-04 10:25:52 PM  
He should have crossed the border at Fort Hancock.
 
2020-12-04 10:30:24 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-12-04 11:10:10 PM  

blondambition: Statute of limitations, baby.


Exactly.

sinko swimo: Crewmannumber6: Who among us hasn't seen that done in a movie and thought "I should have an alias, just in case."?

that was one of many old school methods of new identity, which was cheap and easy for a long time. passports and out of country travel was truly pushing the limits. things got ugly after 9-11. this farker got used to having it too easy for too long.


This.  These days they can catch it but they didn't used to check to see if the person was both dead and alive.
 
2020-12-04 11:19:40 PM  

blondambition: Statute of limitations, baby.


The statute of limitations only applies pre-indictment.  If you aren't indicted in that time, you're free.  But if you are, you just can't hide out for seven (or whatever) years and go about your life.  Once indicted, the clock never stops.
 
2020-12-04 11:28:35 PM  

abhorrent1: The passport fraud charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

10 Years seems a little harsh for basically making a fake ID


When it's a passport it's a bit more serious than a fake ID.  But that's also the max sentence which almost no one ever gets, especially if it's their first conviction.  Newspapers are terrible at writing about sentencing, they always just quote the max since it's a big scary number when there's a simple table they can look at to  decipher what someone would get based on their criminal history.  Guy will likely get a couple years, or plead out and get probation considering his age.
 
2020-12-05 12:03:17 AM  

arstensater: blondambition: Statute of limitations, baby.

The statute of limitations only applies pre-indictment.  If you aren't indicted in that time, you're free.  But if you are, you just can't hide out for seven (or whatever) years and go about your life.  Once indicted, the clock never stops.


Unclear.

I had a couple of default court judgements against me become unenforceable after enough years went by.

I didn't know about them at the time, because I had moved away and no one contacted me at my new address, but found out about them years later when looking at my credit report. In the process of figuring out what those were, the companies figured out where I was, and started pursuing me again.

Never went to court, never sent any of them a payment, just ignored them once they were identified. I haven't heard from any of them for years, and the judgements dropped off my credit report long ago.

Obviously it's not the same situation, but I was definitely found guilty by a judge, and the charges were eventually nullified by time. So it's possible limitations came into play here, the article doesn't say why the indictment was dropped seven years ago.
 
2020-12-05 12:34:31 AM  

Loren: blondambition: Statute of limitations, baby.

Exactly.

sinko swimo: Crewmannumber6: Who among us hasn't seen that done in a movie and thought "I should have an alias, just in case."?

that was one of many old school methods of new identity, which was cheap and easy for a long time. passports and out of country travel was truly pushing the limits. things got ugly after 9-11. this farker got used to having it too easy for too long.

This.  These days they can catch it but they didn't used to check to see if the person was both dead and alive.


Modern passports of most countries also include biometric info these days, and require your finger prints. Lots of old cases "in the system" would pop up if/when they try to renew their passports.
 
2020-12-05 1:01:45 AM  

Crewmannumber6: Who among us hasn't seen that done in a movie and thought "I should have an alias, just in case."?


Max Power!
 
2020-12-05 2:38:13 AM  
After 35 years, I'd think the "evidence" has all, er, disappeared, hasn't it?
 
2020-12-05 4:35:43 AM  
I don't quite get the fingerprints w/the passports.....the only time I had to give up my prints was when I applied for speedy TSA access.

Or did I read it wrong??
 
2020-12-05 5:28:51 AM  
....Frederick Forsyth's The Day Of The Jackal gives a surprisingly detailed explanation of how this sort of thing used to work.  Back in the day (early 90s) my assignment as a USAF recruiter meant I spent a lot of time digging up birth certificates and other vital documents, and believe me - it was more than doable, but after 9/11 that sort of thing got cracked down on hard and fast.

/You'd be surprised how many people, as late as the 90s, still didn't have an SSN
 
2020-12-05 7:58:46 AM  

blondambition: Statute of limitations, baby.


Once indicted the statute is tolled if the person is on the lam.
 
2020-12-05 8:01:31 AM  

abhorrent1: The passport fraud charge carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison.

10 Years seems a little harsh for basically making a fake ID


It is a stiff sentence, but I think the feds have standard sentencing where it's 10 years for a lot of federal felonies. You really only get a sentence like that if you have priors.

A former co-worker of mine was convicted of conspiracy to possess a destructive device and she got 37 months, mostly because she refused to co-operate with the prosecutors and answer questions about the whole thing (I suspect she was protecting her husband). Her co-conspirator who actually possessed the destructive device already had at least one prior federal felony, so the judge hit him with 10 years (the maximum) because federal judges don't like to see repeat offenders in front of their bench.
 
2020-12-05 8:10:08 AM  

Excelsior: Modern passports of most countries also include biometric info these days, and require your finger prints. Lots of old cases "in the system" would pop up if/when they try to renew their passports.


The US does not take fingerprints for passports.

Another article detailed how he was caught: people at the state department noticed the guy was allegedly born in like 1955 and did not have a SSN until like 1985, which they considered to be slightly odd.

Back in the day it used to be that you didn't need a SSN until you wanted to get a job, so there are literally millions of people who didn't get a SSN until they were in their teens or even their 20s. In the early 1980s the IRS changed the rules on claiming children as dependents on taxes to where you had to submit their SSN. The result of that change was something like 6 million children in the USA just vanished - it was people claiming fake children, or it was two separated parents both claiming children. Once people needed a SSN to claim a dependent, the ability to claim fake children or for more than one person to claim a child ended.

As for this guy? It was just someone at the state department that said "This is odd" and he got tossed into the stack of things they might look into if someone has the time and wants to make the effort to do it. For all we know that file got pulled out of the stack at random for some federal investigator to go look into, and he got caught when they took his fingerprints.
 
2020-12-05 9:34:13 AM  
If it was just for pot then who cares anyway.
 
2020-12-05 10:22:11 AM  

blondambition: Statute of limitations, baby.


Feds like to shoot fish in a barrel, especially if the guy will probably die in jail. Probably figured too much effort with old/gone evidence and probably tons of dead witnesses.
 
2020-12-05 10:57:11 AM  

SBinRR: I guess he gets to start using his real name for identification purposes again, which is nice. I suppose.


At this point he is probably kicking himself for not checking in on the old indictment once a year or something. The article says it was dismissed several years ago, maybe because it lingered for a couple decades and the DOJ said "This guy is gone and not worth trying to find" and they gave up. Had he known a couple years ago that he could give up the alias, he might have quietly done so. Transferred all investments and property into his real name to make everything legit and then he wouldn't be facing the passport fraud charge because he could have just got a passport in his own name.
 
2020-12-05 11:24:25 AM  
Holy crap, a gun was discovered in the home.  How scary.
 
2020-12-05 11:29:00 AM  

mrmopar5287: Excelsior: Modern passports of most countries also include biometric info these days, and require your finger prints. Lots of old cases "in the system" would pop up if/when they try to renew their passports.

The US does not take fingerprints for passports.

Another article detailed how he was caught: people at the state department noticed the guy was allegedly born in like 1955 and did not have a SSN until like 1985, which they considered to be slightly odd.

Back in the day it used to be that you didn't need a SSN until you wanted to get a job, so there are literally millions of people who didn't get a SSN until they were in their teens or even their 20s. In the early 1980s the IRS changed the rules on claiming children as dependents on taxes to where you had to submit their SSN. The result of that change was something like 6 million children in the USA just vanished - it was people claiming fake children, or it was two separated parents both claiming children. Once people needed a SSN to claim a dependent, the ability to claim fake children or for more than one person to claim a child ended.

As for this guy? It was just someone at the state department that said "This is odd" and he got tossed into the stack of things they might look into if someone has the time and wants to make the effort to do it. For all we know that file got pulled out of the stack at random for some federal investigator to go look into, and he got caught when they took his fingerprints.


Slowly, as things get computerized, I expect that it will become easier and easier for someone to just run a program looking for suspicious stuff.
 
2020-12-05 11:37:02 AM  

Terrapin Bound: Holy crap, a gun was discovered in the home.  How scary.


It's something prosecutors use to try to get bail denied. Doesn't matter what the charge is or whether the gun was illegally possessed. It's boilerplate stuff to put in front of a judge to try to make someone out as a threat to society.
 
2020-12-05 12:03:37 PM  
That has to burn.
 
2020-12-05 4:46:32 PM  

mrmopar5287: Excelsior: Modern passports of most countries also include biometric info these days, and require your finger prints. Lots of old cases "in the system" would pop up if/when they try to renew their passports.

The US does not take fingerprints for passports.


Yet.

US passports do contain a biometric chip, but at this point it just contains a machine-readable copy of the printed info and a digital copy of the passport photo itself.
If enough other countries start requiring the fingerprint info to be stored on the biometric chip in order to qualify for visa-less entry to their countries, the US is bound to follow sooner or later.

The tech itself to read and process the data is already widely implemented at pretty much every international airport around the world.
 
2020-12-05 4:55:07 PM  

Excelsior: Yet.


I wonder what number of people (like this guy) would go "Oh shiat" if they had to submit fingerprints for a passport. It's got to be more than you might think.
 
2020-12-05 4:57:00 PM  

stuffy: That has to burn.


Investigators showed up to ask him about his identity and he insisted he was who he claimed to be. Then, he didn't disappear like he's done once before. He stayed around for them to come back and pick him up.

All this over an indictment that, had he known it was dismissed years ago, he probably would have given up the fraudulent ID.
 
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