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(Ars Technica)   "Fatigue fracture surfaces were confirmed in the apertural area." We know what you're thinking, but this is this week's Rocket Report, so get your mind out of the flame trench   (arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Cool, International Space Station, Orbital spaceflight, Rocket, Spaceflight, Launch vehicle, NASA, Sub-orbital spaceflight, Spacecraft propulsion  
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530 clicks; posted to STEM » on 04 Dec 2020 at 2:22 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-12-04 12:33:04 PM  
I always think of fatigue as a long term problem. I suppose these engines are tested a few times, then they are launched and become trash. So fatigue cracks they may be but it seems like an issue that shouldn't be arising in expendable hardware.
 
2020-12-04 2:29:34 PM  

edmo: I always think of fatigue as a long term problem. I suppose these engines are tested a few times, then they are launched and become trash. So fatigue cracks they may be but it seems like an issue that shouldn't be arising in expendable hardware.


I expect it could come from rapid cyclic loading too, such as uneven flow of gas impinging on a turbine or instability causing pressure oscillations in a combustion chamber.
 
2020-12-04 3:22:05 PM  
What a fatigue fracture in an 8th Gen Honda Civic engine block might look like:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-12-04 3:25:41 PM  
...and after a visit from my buddy JB Weld:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
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