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(Bloomberg)   How US metro areas voted in the 2020 election   (bloomberg.com) divider line
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1833 clicks; posted to Politics » on 04 Dec 2020 at 8:29 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



34 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-12-04 11:02:10 AM  
They should done an overlay of the number of covid cases in each metro.

That aside, information on religion, race, income and age would been interesting to see also.  Some real demographics.
 
2020-12-04 3:14:21 PM  
What the US government defines as a "metro area" is frankly ludicrous. Kingman-Bullhead City is a large collection of trailer parks, for example.

50,000 people is a medium sized town, not a metro area.

Unless there are over 250,000 minimum in a city it shouldn't be classified as a metropolitan area, and I'm low-balling that significantly.
 
2020-12-04 3:22:44 PM  
Most people in the cities and college towns tend to vote Democrat.

Most rural areas vote Republican.
 
2020-12-04 6:28:13 PM  
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2020-12-04 6:42:26 PM  
From a Tweet:
Johnson County KS is a suburban county outside of Kansas City that shifted rapidly towards Democrats in the past decade. It went from a Romney+17.4% win in 2012 to a Biden+8.2% win, and Biden got 74k more votes than Obama in 2012, while Trump got 3k less votes than Romney in 2012
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This is why the Republican Party is in trouble. The cities are staying blue, the suburbs are getting more blue, the exurbs are getting more blue, all the GOP has left is the rural areas, and that's not enough to win. That why all they have left is gerrymandering and voter suppression. Basically cheating to win. Yet they say Democrats cheated and stole election.
 
2020-12-04 8:32:41 PM  
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Big red dots : nuke targets
 
2020-12-04 8:37:50 PM  
Speaking of Bloomberg, never forget

https://fusion.inquirer.com/politics/​p​ennsylvania/mike-bloomberg-pat-toomey-​20200218.html

Hey, hey. Hey. Imagine what better shape we'd be in if we only needed to win one of the two Georgia US Senate runoffs. Hey.
 
2020-12-04 8:38:12 PM  
What an awful map. It makes Caper Wyoming look as significant as the Washington DC area, despite having 1% of the population.
 
2020-12-04 8:38:12 PM  
Is the size of the dots simply determined by the percentage of the vote?

Because there's some mighty big red dots in Texas over some mighty small cities.
 
2020-12-04 8:39:32 PM  
That is a rather generous definition of metro areas, but, sure.

So, basically, the more common social advantages you have, the more you vote like an asshole.  Nothing new there.
 
2020-12-04 8:39:53 PM  
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Fixed for how Trump believes it actually happened.
 
2020-12-04 8:44:04 PM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: What the US government defines as a "metro area" is frankly ludicrous. Kingman-Bullhead City is a large collection of trailer parks, for example.

50,000 people is a medium sized town, not a metro area.

Unless there are over 250,000 minimum in a city it shouldn't be classified as a metropolitan area, and I'm low-balling that significantly.


This.  Farmington NM is not a "Metro Area" (.  San Angelo TX is famous for being the largest city in the US without an interstate highway, but is somehow a "Metro Area"?
 
2020-12-04 8:52:09 PM  

lolmao500: [Fark user image 850x511]

Big red dots : nuke targets


It's not funny when they suggest it, either.

Plus, I've driven past some of those red dots in the MT/ID/WY/UT area... Believe me, plenty of 'em, you couldn't tell the difference. It already looks like the apocalypse.

It was... sad. Driving down the absolutely stunning snake river valley, en route to see *that* view of the Tetons (yes the one from all the photos), visiting Yellowstone.

And then in between there's these towns, population 1800, population 1000, population 453, population 181... That was the saddest one. I happened to not be driving at the time so I could look around. Fences, with wood that's been rotten for 30 years. Barns with doors that are falling off. Houses with collapsed porches and empty windows. Cars and farm equipment straight outta 1950 with nothing left but the rusty iron. The only colors were dirt, grass, blue sky and rust. And this just goes on, retreating back to the hill where the trees are slowly making their move. I mean it was obviously never a big town, but the population would've been thousands, not a hundred.

Then you got to, say, Jackson and it's like, boom, middle of nowhere, here's a small (20K) town with life, commerce, vitality.
 
2020-12-04 8:52:44 PM  
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Lima, OH is not a metro area
 
2020-12-04 8:55:33 PM  
Song Sung Blue
Youtube pp0LkkcmHmI
 
2020-12-04 9:01:55 PM  

austerity101: That is a rather generous definition of metro areas, but, sure.


No joke.  I've lived in or been to a few of the ones on that map that aren't generally recognized as major cities, or frankly even "cities".  Sure, it's the town in the region, but the population is in the tens of thousands and if you drive >10 minutes from the center of town, your in farmland or forest.  Anything resembling "metro" is a minimum of a 45 minute drive, and in some cases hours.
 
2020-12-04 9:07:11 PM  
Why's Phoenix Metro such a small dot, and Flagstaff is a huge metro?
Was there a huge urban flight out of Phoenix?

//the graphic sucks mushroom dick
 
2020-12-04 9:13:04 PM  
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At first I was like, wow! Only 65 for Boston, Cambridge and Newton?  But then...also NH?
Why?
Also, I'm on a phone so maybe I couldn't get to it but no Concord or Manchester, NH?
 
2020-12-04 9:13:32 PM  
The one red dot in New Mexico is a weird town.  Like Hobbs or Artesia transplanted into the northwest corner, but with the racism aimed at the Navajo people instead of Hispanic and Black people.  A town that is half white in middle of the Navajo lands, that consistently votes GOP.  Are there that many roughnecks and oil field suppliers in that town?
 
2020-12-04 9:14:16 PM  

scanman61: Is the size of the dots simply determined by the percentage of the vote?

Because there's some mighty big red dots in Texas over some mighty small cities.


Correct. The larger the margin between the two candidates, the larger the dot.
 
2020-12-04 9:19:50 PM  
This is one of the worst example of using stats to say anything. And this graphic sucks.
 
2020-12-04 9:19:51 PM  
How is Omaha red? We gave Biden an EV.

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2020-12-04 9:28:58 PM  

ScrimBoy: [Fark user image 425x701]
At first I was like, wow! Only 65 for Boston, Cambridge and Newton?  But then...also NH?
Why?
Also, I'm on a phone so maybe I couldn't get to it but no Concord or Manchester, NH?


They gave Manchester and Nashua a dot too (as in, a single dot for both), which is odd because the other caption implies they're lumping some or all of NH in with the Boston metro.  Of all places in NH, Nashua is probably the one you could get away lumping with Boston if you were being generous.  Worcester, on the other hand, does not appear to have a dot.  Then again, it's west of 95 which isn't a real place.
 
2020-12-04 9:32:09 PM  
North Dakota having three metro areas means this map can't be taken seriously.
 
2020-12-04 9:34:13 PM  

New Rising Sun: ScrimBoy: [Fark user image 425x701]
At first I was like, wow! Only 65 for Boston, Cambridge and Newton?  But then...also NH?
Why?
Also, I'm on a phone so maybe I couldn't get to it but no Concord or Manchester, NH?

They gave Manchester and Nashua a dot too (as in, a single dot for both), which is odd because the other caption implies they're lumping some or all of NH in with the Boston metro.  Of all places in NH, Nashua is probably the one you could get away lumping with Boston if you were being generous.  Worcester, on the other hand, does not appear to have a dot.  Then again, it's west of 95 which isn't a real place.


Outside of 495, you mean.  There's a huge part of MA including the richest areas (Wellesley, Weston, etc.) that are between 95 and 495 and many corporate offices.
 
2020-12-04 9:50:15 PM  

monsatano: How is Omaha red? We gave Biden an EV.

[Fark user image 425x566]


It includes Counciltucky
 
2020-12-04 9:52:18 PM  

Tomfoolery Rules Over Logical Living: New Rising Sun: ScrimBoy: [Fark user image 425x701]
At first I was like, wow! Only 65 for Boston, Cambridge and Newton?  But then...also NH?
Why?
Also, I'm on a phone so maybe I couldn't get to it but no Concord or Manchester, NH?

They gave Manchester and Nashua a dot too (as in, a single dot for both), which is odd because the other caption implies they're lumping some or all of NH in with the Boston metro.  Of all places in NH, Nashua is probably the one you could get away lumping with Boston if you were being generous.  Worcester, on the other hand, does not appear to have a dot.  Then again, it's west of 95 which isn't a real place.

Outside of 495, you mean.  There's a huge part of MA including the richest areas (Wellesley, Weston, etc.) that are between 95 and 495 and many corporate offices.


I'm quite familiar.  I've heard the legends.  Hic sunt dracones
 
2020-12-04 10:11:18 PM  

SpaceBison: monsatano: How is Omaha red? We gave Biden an EV.

[Fark user image 425x566]

It includes Counciltucky


I guess they're considered part of the metro, since we're nice enough to provide them bus service so they can donate plasma without having to walk six blocks.
 
2020-12-04 10:16:07 PM  

erik-k: lolmao500: [Fark user image 850x511]

Big red dots : nuke targets

It's not funny when they suggest it, either.

Plus, I've driven past some of those red dots in the MT/ID/WY/UT area... Believe me, plenty of 'em, you couldn't tell the difference. It already looks like the apocalypse.

It was... sad. Driving down the absolutely stunning snake river valley, en route to see *that* view of the Tetons (yes the one from all the photos), visiting Yellowstone.

And then in between there's these towns, population 1800, population 1000, population 453, population 181... That was the saddest one. I happened to not be driving at the time so I could look around. Fences, with wood that's been rotten for 30 years. Barns with doors that are falling off. Houses with collapsed porches and empty windows. Cars and farm equipment straight outta 1950 with nothing left but the rusty iron. The only colors were dirt, grass, blue sky and rust. And this just goes on, retreating back to the hill where the trees are slowly making their move. I mean it was obviously never a big town, but the population would've been thousands, not a hundred.

Then you got to, say, Jackson and it's like, boom, middle of nowhere, here's a small (20K) town with life, commerce, vitality.


You're not wrong. It's like time stopped in some of these places.

I remember the first time my family visited Cottonwood, Arizona. My mother said, "My God. It's abandoned."
 
2020-12-04 10:17:14 PM  

NM Volunteer: The one red dot in New Mexico is a weird town.  Like Hobbs or Artesia transplanted into the northwest corner, but with the racism aimed at the Navajo people instead of Hispanic and Black people.  A town that is half white in middle of the Navajo lands, that consistently votes GOP.  Are there that many roughnecks and oil field suppliers in that town?


Farmington sucks.
 
2020-12-04 10:25:12 PM  

NM Volunteer: The one red dot in New Mexico is a weird town.  Like Hobbs or Artesia transplanted into the northwest corner, but with the racism aimed at the Navajo people instead of Hispanic and Black people.  A town that is half white in middle of the Navajo lands, that consistently votes GOP.  Are there that many roughnecks and oil field suppliers in that town?


IIRC, Farmington is a oil and natural gas town.  I think there is a major pipeline that goes through there?
 
2020-12-05 6:37:29 AM  
That map is ridiculous. Ask any Texan to identify the state's "metro areas" and they'll name Houston, Dallas-Fort Worth (which is all one place these days), San Antonio, Austin, El Paso, Amarillo, and maybe Corpus Christi, Lubbock, & Midland-Odessa (but only together, and only because they're so isolated from everyplace else) at a stretch. Calling Harlingen, Texarkana, Sherman, or Longview a "metro area" is a joke. They're just large towns. Nothing "metro" about them.

It's like renaming a state college with 300 students a "university" just to make the townspeople feel better about themselves.
 
2020-12-05 7:00:08 AM  

mksmith: That map is ridiculous. Ask any Texan to identify the state's "metro areas" and they'll name Houston, Dallas-Fort Worth (which is all one place these days), San Antonio, Austin, El Paso, Amarillo, and maybe Corpus Christi, Lubbock, & Midland-Odessa (but only together, and only because they're so isolated from everyplace else) at a stretch. Calling Harlingen, Texarkana, Sherman, or Longview a "metro area" is a joke. They're just large towns. Nothing "metro" about them.

It's like renaming a state college with 300 students a "university" just to make the townspeople feel better about themselves.


It's not just the map, It's how the federal government defines metro areas. It's stupid.
 
2020-12-05 10:25:52 AM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: mksmith: That map is ridiculous. Ask any Texan to identify the state's "metro areas" and they'll name Houston, Dallas-Fort Worth (which is all one place these days), San Antonio, Austin, El Paso, Amarillo, and maybe Corpus Christi, Lubbock, & Midland-Odessa (but only together, and only because they're so isolated from everyplace else) at a stretch. Calling Harlingen, Texarkana, Sherman, or Longview a "metro area" is a joke. They're just large towns. Nothing "metro" about them.

It's like renaming a state college with 300 students a "university" just to make the townspeople feel better about themselves.

It's not just the map, It's how the federal government defines metro areas. It's stupid.


The Feds are interested in SMSAs, which are defined by economic measures of various kinds. When most civilians say "metro area," they're just using it as a synonym for "urban area," which is a very different thing. Longview is an SMSA that actually covers three (rural) counties, and it actually is an "economic hub" -- though a very local and limited one. But even Longview residents would laugh if you called them urbanites.
 
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