Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Guardian)   "Hundreds of comments vociferously argued why axis inversion was the only way to navigate a game world." And they were wrong   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Silly, Perception, Psychology, Sense, Video game, Sensory system, Gamer, Visual perception, Visual system  
•       •       •

840 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 03 Dec 2020 at 10:36 AM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2020-12-03 10:46:38 AM  
23 votes:
Flight/space sims ingrained the controls into my brain.  I invert my controller so i don't have to think about moving and/or looking around.

/also pisses the kids off when they play after me
//bonus
 
2020-12-03 10:53:12 AM  
13 votes:
I don't understand how this is even a debate. When you look up in real life, you tilt your head back, and when you look down you tilt it down. Why the hell would you want a controller or key to do the opposite?
 
2020-12-03 10:39:22 AM  
13 votes:
Inverting the mouse is like controlling your character's vision by placing your hand on top of their head, so if you push "foward" they are going to look down.

Playing a fps with a controller is just silly so I can't comment on that.
 
2020-12-03 10:58:05 AM  
8 votes:
The good old days of joystick control of flight and mech sims is why I always invert the y-axis for camera in a 3d world.
 
2020-12-03 10:59:02 AM  
6 votes:
To confuse things even further, it depends whether I'm using a control pad or control stick.

Pads are "normal", up for up, down for down.

But my brain doesn't use "up" or "down" with a stick*; it's push forward and pull back**.

*phrasing?
**phrasing!
 
2020-12-03 10:56:31 AM  
6 votes:
On a controller with an analog stick, I invert. Pull back on the stick to look up, just like I tilt my head back to look up. On a computer I don't, because I think of the mouse pointer not the point of view. (even though the pointer is invisible)
 
2020-12-03 10:25:54 AM  
6 votes:
When the Guardian ran an article asking why a large minority of game players invert the Y axis on their controls - meaning that they push their joypad's thumb stick down to move upwards on the screen - the response was huge.

Should be the z-axis anyway you dolts.
 
2020-12-03 8:32:24 PM  
2 votes:
Marcos P:
OldJames:
BlackBeard The Pirate:
I won a math debate:

[stick on back of head argument]

This explanation falls apart when considering horizontal motion, moving the stick to the left would make you look to the right, but no one sets up the controls that way,
 
2020-12-03 4:26:59 PM  
2 votes:
It never occurred to me to mentally attach the motion of the analog stick to the back, top, or front of the character's head.

Flight sims are definitely inverted, but I can go either way for everything else.
 
2020-12-03 12:17:20 PM  
2 votes:
I'm a y-inverter. It's the best way for me to play. If you're not a y-inverter then that's ok too. On the other hand, x-inverters, are f***ing psychopaths.

/s
 
2020-12-03 11:15:26 AM  
2 votes:

McGrits: The good old days of joystick control of flight and mech sims is why I always invert the y-axis for camera in a 3d world.


See, that's why it depends on the game. If I'm playing in third-person mode moving an avatar, W is forward & S is back. If I'm playing in a flight or mech sim where I'm piloting something that's supposed to have a yoke or controller that changes the attitude of a vehicle, W is yoke forward (attitude down) & S is yoke backwards (attitude up.) And, as I posted before, it also depends on the controller - I'll change the layout to ensure optimal physical comfort regardless of the game's intent.

The weird & neat thing is that I don't somehow seem to screw that up during play - if it's immersive enough, I completely forget about the fact that I have differing layouts for different games.
 
2020-12-03 11:11:59 AM  
2 votes:
It's not that hard.  Your head is the joystick, and someone pulls back on the top of your head, so which way do your eyes naturally move?  Up, that's where.

Someone pushes the top of your head forward, what do you see?  (This exercize is left to the class...)
 
2020-12-03 6:58:36 PM  
1 vote:
My son uses up for up and down for down for spaceflight in Battlefront II and Squadrons.

I have tried to explain to him that he is wrong, but there really isn't a compelling argument, only: "This is how the pros do it because of real airplanes."

It's very frustrating being totally correct for no good reason.
 
2020-12-03 5:30:30 PM  
1 vote:
This topic is a perfect example of why you do not allow 4chan to discuss videogames.
 
2020-12-03 3:57:29 PM  
1 vote:
Count me in the inverted crowd. I've likened it to controlling a camera on a tripod. A helpful illustration:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-12-03 2:08:09 PM  
1 vote:

Sarah Jessica Farker: DerAppie: Sarah Jessica Farker: move mouse left, view moves right

wait, what?

In the real world, as one turns one's head to the left, the objects in one's view "disappear" to the right.

In flight sim and FPS mouse interactions, as one moves one's mouse to the left, the objects in one's view "disappear" TO THE RIGHT.


Ah, the view doesn't move, the view window moves.
Cause in the real world (and in games) the environment isn't the thing that is moving. So the view window moves, and it moves to the left. Which, yes, causes things to drop from view from the right.

Confusion cleared up.
 
2020-12-03 1:24:32 PM  
1 vote:

DerAppie: Sarah Jessica Farker: move mouse left, view moves right

wait, what?


In the real world, as one turns one's head to the left, the objects in one's view "disappear" to the right.

In flight sim and FPS mouse interactions, as one moves one's mouse to the left, the objects in one's view "disappear" TO THE RIGHT.
 
2020-12-03 1:01:00 PM  
1 vote:

Sarah Jessica Farker: move mouse left, view moves right


wait, what?
 
2020-12-03 11:59:11 AM  
1 vote:
I read another article about this a while back, and one of the things it pointed out was that older gamers were more likely to use inverted y-axis. IIRC it was related to playing early flying games, where you had to pull back to go up. I think this is true for me, think of even the old Star Wars arcade game where you twisted the joystick back to aim upwards.

That said, I found I don't invert the y-axis if I'm using a mouse, only if I'm using a controller. But I can't just switch, I've literally had to give up on games that don't let you invert the axis.
 
2020-12-03 11:53:09 AM  
1 vote:

Lord Limo Zeen: Flight/space sims ingrained the controls into my brain.  I invert my controller so i don't have to think about moving and/or looking around.

/also pisses the kids off when they play after me
//bonus


The default controls on Star Wars: Squadrons is up for up/down for down.

Anyone who does this on anything remotely resembling a fight sim should be fired.
 
2020-12-03 11:27:34 AM  
1 vote:

BlackBeard The Pirate: FormlessOne: Huh. For me, it depends on the game, but I'm not typically an inverter.

CSB: I play MMOs & simulation games on PC, typically, and when I do so I use a game controller like the Nostromo or, right now, the Tartarus Pro.

Because it's a thumbstick, and because I typically have to hold it in position for long stretches to move forward, I don't use the normal or inverted layout - I instead rotate it 90 degrees counter-clockwise, so that I'm essentially "closing" my thumb to move forward, "opening" my thumb to move backward, and "pushing" or "pulling" my thumb to move right & left, respectively. I do this because it eases the stress on the proximal interphalangeal joint of my left thumb (read "my hand gets less sore when I play for hours") when I'm holding that button down to move forward while I use the same hand to press other buttons on the gamepad.

That's an interesting viewpoint.  For PC gaming, I always set all motion on the mouse (a three main button, preferably).  Run forward is the middle, back is the right, and the main fire is the left.  Y axis is "inverted" (I dislike this misnomer!), so push forward on the mouse acts just like a flight sim...

The main two reasons for this was to give me the ability to run and gun in first person shooters without fatigue, and to keep my left hand free to swig my beer whilst on a "KILLING SPREE!".


It's specific to third-person, "camera-over-shoulder" MMOs, at least for me. I use the mouse to adjust camera facing, toggle autorun & cursor mode, and the gamepad to run combat commands (action bars, basic UI interaction, etc.), keeping the keyboard free primarily for text chatting if & when necessary.

Typically, left hand's always on the Tartarus, right hand's on the G700, and the keyboard's a social device, so it doesn't get used as much.
 
2020-12-03 11:10:57 AM  
1 vote:
Huh. For me, it depends on the game, but I'm not typically an inverter.

CSB: I play MMOs & simulation games on PC, typically, and when I do so I use a game controller like the Nostromo or, right now, the Tartarus Pro.

Because it's a thumbstick, and because I typically have to hold it in position for long stretches to move forward, I don't use the normal or inverted layout - I instead rotate it 90 degrees counter-clockwise, so that I'm essentially "closing" my thumb to move forward, "opening" my thumb to move backward, and "pushing" or "pulling" my thumb to move right & left, respectively. I do this because it eases the stress on the proximal interphalangeal joint of my left thumb (read "my hand gets less sore when I play for hours") when I'm holding that button down to move forward while I use the same hand to press other buttons on the gamepad.
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.