Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Some Guy)   Is it possible to use a heavy duty power outlet for a nightlight, with the help of an adapter? (link goes to sketch of the electrical outlet type in question)   (qph.fs.quoracdn.net) divider line
    More: Misc  
•       •       •

415 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 01 Dec 2020 at 9:35 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-12-01 7:46:17 AM  
That appears to be a 220-volt outlet (possibly 221). Some LED nightlights might be able to handle that; read the label.

Most nightlights, however, will be briefly daylights before the smoke and flames appear.
 
2020-12-01 8:28:57 AM  
You are in canada.
You'll need the RX5-y37/28 adapter in Blue, with the french instructions.
Bon chance.
 
2020-12-01 9:03:24 AM  
Just wire two in series.
 
2020-12-01 9:25:50 AM  
That's just a NEMA 5-20 or 6-20 and it is *either* 220v or 120v.  You can get 5/6-20 to 5-15 (120v) adapters on Amazon for cheap but check the outlet to see if it is 220v first.  If it is 220v you will need an adapter that steps that voltage down or you will need to re-wire your outlet (rewiring is safer and easier IMO).

220v rewire to 110/120v - Not going into full details but if that outlet is 220 it is probably on a double-pole 20 or 30 amp breaker (basically looks like two breakers tied together).  You  *should* be able to just change the outlet to 110/120 at the breaker box without rewiring anything in the outlet - but even if you did at the outlet, it's easy.
 
2020-12-01 9:52:58 AM  
 
151
2020-12-01 9:54:35 AM  

jasonvatch: That appears to be a 220-volt outlet (possibly 221). Some LED nightlights might be able to handle that; read the label.

Most nightlights, however, will be briefly daylights before the smoke and flames appear.


Whatever it takes
 
2020-12-01 10:02:28 AM  
Find a neighbor with a multimeter you can borrow and figure out what voltage is on it.

Check the thing you're plugging in to see if it says it accepts whatever you found the voltage to be (if it doesn't say anything presume it only accepts 110/120).

If they match up then get a shape changer from a local hardware store, or amazon, or whatever.

If they don't match up watch some youtube videos on swapping wiring in your breaker box and decide how froggy you feel, then hire an electrician if it really matters.

Alternatively buy something that steps the voltage down.


Or, you know, buy a battery operated light.
 
2020-12-01 10:14:46 AM  
 
2020-12-01 10:20:03 AM  
Subby here. Thanks for the input. I'm in a NYC apartment, and so really don't want to get into rewiring anything, or asking my super to do it. He's a nice guy, but his "repairs" aren't generally much better than I could do after watching a YouTube video, and I've never wanted to dink with electricity. Installing a ceiling fan is the most daring I've ever gotten.

The outlet is next to a window, and was clearly meant for a window A/C. I don't need for that purpose though since my A/C plugs into a regular outlet on the other side of the window. This outlet location would be handy for placing a nightlight at the front of my apartment... but if we're talking electrical project, I'll just leave it alone. "Smoke and flames" for the sake of a nightlight are not really how I want to end this godforsaken year, though it would certainly be on point!
 
2020-12-01 10:28:06 AM  

wax_on: ElecroBOOM


Okay now that is funny as hell. :-)
 
2020-12-01 10:51:26 AM  

Lydia_C: Subby here. Thanks for the input. I'm in a NYC apartment, and so really don't want to get into rewiring anything, or asking my super to do it. He's a nice guy, but his "repairs" aren't generally much better than I could do after watching a YouTube video, and I've never wanted to dink with electricity. Installing a ceiling fan is the most daring I've ever gotten.

The outlet is next to a window, and was clearly meant for a window A/C. I don't need for that purpose though since my A/C plugs into a regular outlet on the other side of the window. This outlet location would be handy for placing a nightlight at the front of my apartment... but if we're talking electrical project, I'll just leave it alone. "Smoke and flames" for the sake of a nightlight are not really how I want to end this godforsaken year, though it would certainly be on point!



Just get yourself an LED nightlight that runs on batteries.

I have a motion-sensing light (no strictly speaking a nightlight), that also has a light sensor, so it doesn't turn on during the day or if there are other lights on.  It's mounted in a dark hallway upstairs, uses 4 C cells, and I haven't had to replace them since I bought the house a year ago.  I'm sure you can find a similar thing that just turns on when the ambient light drops.
 
2020-12-01 10:53:01 AM  
Duh! Just snap off one plug prong on the night-light seeing as you only need half the power.

/sarcasm
//DON'T do this
///also don't seek advice from sarcastic assholes on the interwab
 
2020-12-01 10:56:31 AM  

FrancoFile: Lydia_C: Subby here. Thanks for the input. I'm in a NYC apartment, and so really don't want to get into rewiring anything, or asking my super to do it. He's a nice guy, but his "repairs" aren't generally much better than I could do after watching a YouTube video, and I've never wanted to dink with electricity. Installing a ceiling fan is the most daring I've ever gotten.

The outlet is next to a window, and was clearly meant for a window A/C. I don't need for that purpose though since my A/C plugs into a regular outlet on the other side of the window. This outlet location would be handy for placing a nightlight at the front of my apartment... but if we're talking electrical project, I'll just leave it alone. "Smoke and flames" for the sake of a nightlight are not really how I want to end this godforsaken year, though it would certainly be on point!


Just get yourself an LED nightlight that runs on batteries.

I have a motion-sensing light (no strictly speaking a nightlight), that also has a light sensor, so it doesn't turn on during the day or if there are other lights on.  It's mounted in a dark hallway upstairs, uses 4 C cells, and I haven't had to replace them since I bought the house a year ago.  I'm sure you can find a similar thing that just turns on when the ambient light drops.


This.
 
2020-12-01 11:00:19 AM  
220 is not something to fark around with. In a rental, you don't want to go rewiring it either, as the next tenant will probably the 220 outlet for their AC.

Leave it be and get a battery powered LED nightlight.
 
2020-12-01 11:45:30 AM  
Helpful images of what a 220v night light might look like:

Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-12-01 12:45:52 PM  

Lydia_C: wax_on: ElecroBOOM

Okay now that is funny as hell. :-)


It gets me every time even though I know that the zaps and explosions are planned. I've been there so many times accidentally.
 
2020-12-01 1:28:28 PM  

UberDave: That's just a NEMA 5-20 or 6-20 and it is *either* 220v or 120v.  You can get 5/6-20 to 5-15 (120v) adapters on Amazon for cheap but check the outlet to see if it is 220v first.  If it is 220v you will need an adapter that steps that voltage down or you will need to re-wire your outlet (rewiring is safer and easier IMO).

220v rewire to 110/120v - Not going into full details but if that outlet is 220 it is probably on a double-pole 20 or 30 amp breaker (basically looks like two breakers tied together).  You  *should* be able to just change the outlet to 110/120 at the breaker box without rewiring anything in the outlet - but even if you did at the outlet, it's easy.


That is a 220v outlet..  the 120v outlet has a vertical LH opening rather than horizontal... both are rated at 20 amps.    The 220v outlet does not have a neutral, but does have a ground.. to convert to 120v, go with a single pole breaker and attach the white wire to the neutral bus, and to the silver screw on the 120v receptacle..  the black wire goes to the brass screw on the receptacle, and to the breaker. the ground goes to the ground connection on the receptacle.
 
2020-12-01 2:14:57 PM  

Lydia_C: Subby here. Thanks for the input. I'm in a NYC apartment, and so really don't want to get into rewiring anything, or asking my super to do it. He's a nice guy, but his "repairs" aren't generally much better than I could do after watching a YouTube video, and I've never wanted to dink with electricity. Installing a ceiling fan is the most daring I've ever gotten.

The outlet is next to a window, and was clearly meant for a window A/C. I don't need for that purpose though since my A/C plugs into a regular outlet on the other side of the window. This outlet location would be handy for placing a nightlight at the front of my apartment... but if we're talking electrical project, I'll just leave it alone. "Smoke and flames" for the sake of a nightlight are not really how I want to end this godforsaken year, though it would certainly be on point!


If you know someone with a multimeter I'd say it's worth a quick check out to see what voltage is on it.  But I say that as the guy with three multimeters.

Your "simplest" outcome of this is that it's a 110/120 (normal US) volt outlet with the funky connector.  If that's the case you need a $15-20 shape changer to get it to a "normal" plug.

Since you aren't going to do anything electrically to change the plug if it isn't normal wall voltage and is 220, then you're in battery land.
 
2020-12-01 2:30:40 PM  

OlderGuy: UberDave: That's just a NEMA 5-20 or 6-20 and it is *either* 220v or 120v.  You can get 5/6-20 to 5-15 (120v) adapters on Amazon for cheap but check the outlet to see if it is 220v first.  If it is 220v you will need an adapter that steps that voltage down or you will need to re-wire your outlet (rewiring is safer and easier IMO).

220v rewire to 110/120v - Not going into full details but if that outlet is 220 it is probably on a double-pole 20 or 30 amp breaker (basically looks like two breakers tied together).  You  *should* be able to just change the outlet to 110/120 at the breaker box without rewiring anything in the outlet - but even if you did at the outlet, it's easy.

That is a 220v outlet..  the 120v outlet has a vertical LH opening rather than horizontal... both are rated at 20 amps.    The 220v outlet does not have a neutral, but does have a ground.. to convert to 120v, go with a single pole breaker and attach the white wire to the neutral bus, and to the silver screw on the 120v receptacle..  the black wire goes to the brass screw on the receptacle, and to the breaker. the ground goes to the ground connection on the receptacle.


You have absolutely no clue until you pop the panel and/or hit it with a multimeter.  Yes, a 5/6-20 outlet is *supposed* to be used for 20 amp.  But I can't write three paragraphs explaining how that might not be the case.

I literally just switched out a 220v cooktop in my house for gas.  It was plugged into a NEMA 5-15 (your basic wall plug) that was hooked, in the breaker box, to a 2-pole **30** amp breaker.  It was up to code (at least in the 80s). It was heavy gauge 3-wire and both hot and neutral were hooked to the 2-pole breaker (as would be expected).  I simply killed the main, popped out the breaker, hooked the neutral to the neutral bus, connected the hot to a single pole 20amp and filled the empty slot with a unconnected breaker.  Boom - 220 is now a 110 an I didn't have to do shiat in the wall.

I'm not a tradesman but I've seen NEMA 5/6-20 outlets for both 110 and 220.  In fact, now that I think about it, I think NEMA 5-20 is the designation for that plug type hooked to 110/120.
 
2020-12-01 3:59:17 PM  
guys, if the outlet is shaped funny, its not 110v.  you don't need a multimeter.
 
2020-12-01 5:23:10 PM  

UberDave: OlderGuy: UberDave: That's just a NEMA 5-20 or 6-20 and it is *either* 220v or 120v.  You can get 5/6-20 to 5-15 (120v) adapters on Amazon for cheap but check the outlet to see if it is 220v first.  If it is 220v you will need an adapter that steps that voltage down or you will need to re-wire your outlet (rewiring is safer and easier IMO).

220v rewire to 110/120v - Not going into full details but if that outlet is 220 it is probably on a double-pole 20 or 30 amp breaker (basically looks like two breakers tied together).  You  *should* be able to just change the outlet to 110/120 at the breaker box without rewiring anything in the outlet - but even if you did at the outlet, it's easy.

That is a 220v outlet..  the 120v outlet has a vertical LH opening rather than horizontal... both are rated at 20 amps.    The 220v outlet does not have a neutral, but does have a ground.. to convert to 120v, go with a single pole breaker and attach the white wire to the neutral bus, and to the silver screw on the 120v receptacle..  the black wire goes to the brass screw on the receptacle, and to the breaker. the ground goes to the ground connection on the receptacle.

You have absolutely no clue until you pop the panel and/or hit it with a multimeter.  Yes, a 5/6-20 outlet is *supposed* to be used for 20 amp.  But I can't write three paragraphs explaining how that might not be the case.

I literally just switched out a 220v cooktop in my house for gas.  It was plugged into a NEMA 5-15 (your basic wall plug) that was hooked, in the breaker box, to a 2-pole **30** amp breaker.  It was up to code (at least in the 80s). It was heavy gauge 3-wire and both hot and neutral were hooked to the 2-pole breaker (as would be expected).  I simply killed the main, popped out the breaker, hooked the neutral to the neutral bus, connected the hot to a single pole 20amp and filled the empty slot with a unconnected breaker.  Boom - 220 is now a 110 an I didn't have to do shiat in the wall.

I'm not a t ...


There,s the difference... I am.    Did my apprenticeship from '64 to '68... how about laying off the weed before posting bullshait like this...
1. the single receptacle shown is a 220v receptacle... 120v plugs won't fit
2. no way in hell a 220v 30 amp cooktop was plugged into a 15 amp 120v receptacle.. and also good luck connecting #10 wire to that receptacle... it would break when you tried to force it into the wall box and burn up after 30 minutes of use..
3.  You are full of shait.
 
2020-12-01 10:15:27 PM  
You smell that? Is something burning? Actually, you can get 120V from one of the hots to the ground, but it's on a circuit with like a 30A breaker or something rather than the normal 15A so I wouldn't plug in a Chinesium nightlight.
 
2020-12-02 9:30:09 AM  

Russ1642: You smell that? Is something burning? Actually, you can get 120V from one of the hots to the ground, but it's on a circuit with like a 30A breaker or something rather than the normal 15A so I wouldn't plug in a Chinesium nightlight.


Like the monkey said to the elephant : if it don't fit, don't force it.    No nightlight plug is configured to plug into a 250v receptacle..  if you want to Rube it, get a pigtail socket and a small bulb, and stick the wires where you want...  assembly is required. Common sense is not involved.
 
Displayed 23 of 23 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.