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(Some Guy)   If you are in a position to help out, please find and donate to your local food bank. People need some help right now   (feedingamerica.org) divider line
    More: PSA, United States, Food, nationwide network of food banks, Feeding America, Photography, Food bank, Copyright, All rights reserved  
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270 clicks; posted to Food » on 30 Nov 2020 at 5:35 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-11-30 6:47:06 PM  
Also, aside from direct donations, you can set up Amazon Smile to give a small amount of each purchase to a charity of your choice. You have to pick one on their list, but they've got tons of food banks, so you'll be likely to find one nearby.
 
2020-11-30 7:11:37 PM  
For what it is worth, I donate to food charities every time I get groceries. Sometimes only $1, sometimes $25 for a "bag", but I do it every time.
It was only a brief time in my adult life before I got my schitt strate, but I have been hungry, and that schitt sucks.

On the flip side, my M-I-L goes to food banks, and completely milks the system... taking as much as she can, things she doesn't even want, and passing it along to relatives... and not just food.

What am I trying to say?
I donate to food banks because I don't think anyone should go hungry, that is a sign of a failing society. I donate even though I know first hand some people completely take advantage of it. I donate because maybe someone can get some sleep or not get sick or not do something stupid for a buck.

My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.

Did I mention that I am by no stretch of the definition "rich"?
 
2020-11-30 7:35:55 PM  

Percise1: For what it is worth, I donate to food charities every time I get groceries. Sometimes only $1, sometimes $25 for a "bag", but I do it every time.
It was only a brief time in my adult life before I got my schitt strate, but I have been hungry, and that schitt sucks.

On the flip side, my M-I-L goes to food banks, and completely milks the system... taking as much as she can, things she doesn't even want, and passing it along to relatives... and not just food.

What am I trying to say?
I donate to food banks because I don't think anyone should go hungry, that is a sign of a failing society. I donate even though I know first hand some people completely take advantage of it. I donate because maybe someone can get some sleep or not get sick or not do something stupid for a buck.

My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.

Did I mention that I am by no stretch of the definition "rich"?


I hate it when food goes to my waist.
 
2020-11-30 7:42:30 PM  
I work a food distribution weekly.  We average about 180 boxes every Friday  I normally handle the sign up sheets.  I have seen ID cards from Nigeria and and the Dominican Republic.    It is a symbol of a failing society that people come here and work long and hard hours only to still need assistance. .
 
2020-11-30 7:46:52 PM  

Percise1: My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.


That might be a liability issue.  People would donate it and people would take it and 99.99% of the time it would be safe.  But someone in that .01% that might get sick and just might sue.
 
2020-11-30 7:55:20 PM  
When my sister was a first time mom her daughter had a lot of digestion issues.  She would go out and drop $250 on this best formula she could get only to find out that my niece couldn't eat it.  Pediatrician would suggest another brand, another $250 and the same result.  Rinse repeat several times until she found the right one.  So the food bank ended up getting an entire shopping cart, like $1000 dollars worth of in date unopened formula.  You should have seen their faces when I rolled that cart in.

/food banks need formula too, not just canned vegetables
 
2020-11-30 8:06:23 PM  
There's a place near me in Northern AZ that sells an unreasonable amount of B-grade restaurant food for 50 bucks.  I couldn't possibly use a fraction of it, since I'm just one person.

I'd like to figure out how to share it with folks.  But check this out.  

https://m.facebook.com/MayasMercado89/​posts/2739311082771284
 
2020-11-30 8:14:52 PM  
Cash is king for food banks. They can buy in bulk at better prices
 
2020-11-30 8:15:16 PM  

FarkingSmurf: Percise1: My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.

That might be a liability issue.  People would donate it and people would take it and 99.99% of the time it would be safe.  But someone in that .01% that might get sick and just might sue.


Lawyers wouldn't necessarily wait.
 
2020-11-30 8:16:13 PM  
I clearly don't know how Facebook links work.

But it's a stupid amount of food.  Any AZ peeps can google "Mayas Mercado food box" to see what they're offering this week.
 
2020-11-30 8:24:23 PM  

zerkalo: Cash is king for food banks. They can buy in bulk at better prices


Cash donations go a long way for food banks.
Also picking up a few extra items when out shopping helps.
Most food banks will have a list of items that are high demand.
 
2020-11-30 8:56:17 PM  
Just made a donation to the local food bank, next up is the local domestic violence shelter - they seem to have gotten busier lately, for some reason, and are always in need of donations in the best of times.  Also, their biggest fundraiser of the year probably won't be happening this year.
 
2020-11-30 9:03:44 PM  

zerkalo: Cash is king for food banks. They can buy in bulk at better prices


This - if you can, donate cash instead of food whenever possible. And, if you can, aggregate with your neighbors or friends - larger donation increments typically allow food banks to capitalize more frequently on bulk purchasing arrangements. Otherwise, they have to aggregate smaller donations over time to do so, and sometimes lose those arrangements because they're not able to strike while the iron's hot.
 
2020-11-30 9:08:46 PM  
This is a long shot, but Farkers are smart, and aside from the potato tab, generally helpful.

I was laid off in June due to Covid related business decline at my firm.  I have not been able to find meaningful employment in my field since.  I did get a lead today on a job with a former employer, but if that does not pan out, I am considering a drastic change in tack.

My property is zoned dual use commercial with a barn, there are two vacant storefronts, a vacant church with meeting hall, and an active church with meeting hall in my little town which could be rented for cheap to nil.  I have twenty-odd years of experience in restaurants from a previous incarnation.  There is a need, likely for a decade to come, for more soup kitchens and food pantries, and my area, while affluent in general, is greatly underserved.

How difficult would it be to start a non-profit soup kitchen?  I have volunteered, but never as more than a set of hands.  Certainly not an administrator.

I am well versed in the requirements for operating a commercial kitchen, though I am open to suggestions there as well especially when it comes to managing donated product.  It is the 501(c)(3) aspect which really is my focus at the moment.

Cheers!
 
151
2020-11-30 11:28:33 PM  
Not to shiat on this at all, but how are food banks handling their internal staff/volunteers during these times? I've volunteered a few times and their safety guidelines were a little lax during normal times. I'm really hoping those places would be smart enough to... You know, be smart, but does anyone have any experience RECENTLY with their practices?

I'm halfway between volunteering and needing their services for myself, is why I wonder. If the next couple weeks don't go my way... Gonna be real sketchy for me...
 
2020-11-30 11:48:15 PM  

Gentlequiet: This is a long shot, but Farkers are smart, and aside from the potato tab, generally helpful.

I was laid off in June due to Covid related business decline at my firm.  I have not been able to find meaningful employment in my field since.  I did get a lead today on a job with a former employer, but if that does not pan out, I am considering a drastic change in tack.

My property is zoned dual use commercial with a barn, there are two vacant storefronts, a vacant church with meeting hall, and an active church with meeting hall in my little town which could be rented for cheap to nil.  I have twenty-odd years of experience in restaurants from a previous incarnation.  There is a need, likely for a decade to come, for more soup kitchens and food pantries, and my area, while affluent in general, is greatly underserved.

How difficult would it be to start a non-profit soup kitchen?  I have volunteered, but never as more than a set of hands.  Certainly not an administrator.

I am well versed in the requirements for operating a commercial kitchen, though I am open to suggestions there as well especially when it comes to managing donated product.  It is the 501(c)(3) aspect which really is my focus at the moment.

Cheers!


I'm no help, but I just wanted to say that's an amazing idea, and I hope you get the help and advice you need to pull it off.
 
2020-12-01 1:57:18 AM  
We're all, as a community, still kind of reeling from this (I know, I've mentioned it before), derecho that flattened our area back in August. Most storm debris cleanup has been completed, but many are still without resources for food -- or even a good way to fix any gaping holes in their roof's caused be trees falling.

Below is a local organization that I've worked with in the past, and if you feel obliged a donation could really help:

https://www.hacap.org/donate
 
2020-12-01 7:45:24 AM  

FormlessOne: zerkalo: Cash is king for food banks. They can buy in bulk at better prices

This - if you can, donate cash instead of food whenever possible. And, if you can, aggregate with your neighbors or friends - larger donation increments typically allow food banks to capitalize more frequently on bulk purchasing arrangements. Otherwise, they have to aggregate smaller donations over time to do so, and sometimes lose those arrangements because they're not able to strike while the iron's hot.


On my commute there is a house that has set up a little stand, give what you can, take what you need. I put up two boxes of saltines, two jars of peanut butter, and several boxes of Mac n cheese and rice er roni. It was gone on my return home. I'm thinking every home should have a stand.
 
2020-12-01 9:54:36 AM  
All 6 of our locations recently held a food drive to help replenish local food banks post-Thanksgiving.  Despite us being the smallest location (~30 employees) we managed to collectively make up 67 grocery bags of food which was delivered yesterday.

Even though they had it as a "competition" with the highest performing location getting lunch, I don't care about that.  I went to Aldi and started grabbing one of whatever I could find that looked like not-total-garbage but still stuff they would be likely to eat (but did throw in a few snack things and a box of kid-centric cereal).  For $25 I filled two reusable shopping bags.

I remember what it was like to have nothing.  At this time 28 years ago, I was living in an ice cream store stockroom with all my worldly possessions in a couple of black garbage bags.  I would sneak in the back door of the YMCA to take showers.  Even though things are tight now, I'm not going to forget those that are now where I was back then.  Giving in this way is certainly better than handing out money to street corner panhandlers.
 
2020-12-01 10:20:37 AM  

TTFK: All 6 of our locations recently held a food drive to help replenish local food banks post-Thanksgiving.  Despite us being the smallest location (~30 employees) we managed to collectively make up 67 grocery bags of food which was delivered yesterday.

Even though they had it as a "competition" with the highest performing location getting lunch, I don't care about that.  I went to Aldi and started grabbing one of whatever I could find that looked like not-total-garbage but still stuff they would be likely to eat (but did throw in a few snack things and a box of kid-centric cereal).  For $25 I filled two reusable shopping bags.

I remember what it was like to have nothing.  At this time 28 years ago, I was living in an ice cream store stockroom with all my worldly possessions in a couple of black garbage bags.  I would sneak in the back door of the YMCA to take showers.  Even though things are tight now, I'm not going to forget those that are now where I was back then.  Giving in this way is certainly better than handing out money to street corner panhandlers.


Good on you man. Hopefully your disposition is better off than where it was 28 years ago (sounds like it may be).
 
2020-12-01 11:25:31 AM  

FarkingSmurf: Percise1: My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.

That might be a liability issue.  People would donate it and people would take it and 99.99% of the time it would be safe.  But someone in that .01% that might get sick and just might sue.


Some states actually have laws against this.  (shielding bakeries and such so they will donate their unsold goods rather than destroying them).

That doesn't mean that they can't be sued, but the odds of it being successful are very, very low.

A friend of mine said that it was a dignity thing, to tell people that they're only worth food that you wouldn't eat yourself.  (although, I'm okay with eating many foods past their "best by" date in general ... although there are a few things that are just nasty when old ... like pickles that have turned to mush, or anything with fats that have gone rancid)

But it would also suck to bring home something from the food bank, thinking that you have a meal for the night, only to find it's something that's gone off.

... oh, and it's also worth mentioning that this only seems to search their affiliated food banks.  I know there's one closer to me than the one that they had listed.  (a collaboration between many of the churches the area, but they only do distributions once a month)
 
2020-12-01 12:59:02 PM  

Oneiros: FarkingSmurf: Percise1: My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.

That might be a liability issue.  People would donate it and people would take it and 99.99% of the time it would be safe.  But someone in that .01% that might get sick and just might sue.

Some states actually have laws against this.  (shielding bakeries and such so they will donate their unsold goods rather than destroying them).

That doesn't mean that they can't be sued, but the odds of it being successful are very, very low.

A friend of mine said that it was a dignity thing, to tell people that they're only worth food that you wouldn't eat yourself.  (although, I'm okay with eating many foods past their "best by" date in general ... although there are a few things that are just nasty when old ... like pickles that have turned to mush, or anything with fats that have gone rancid)

But it would also suck to bring home something from the food bank, thinking that you have a meal for the night, only to find it's something that's gone off.

... oh, and it's also worth mentioning that this only seems to search their affiliated food banks.  I know there's one closer to me than the one that they had listed.  (a collaboration between many of the churches the area, but they only do distributions once a month)


One of the local bagel places used to put their unsold bagels and baked goods in a clean trash bag and leave them by the back door.   That way they could say they were throwing them away.
 
2020-12-01 1:08:28 PM  

151: Not to shiat on this at all, but how are food banks handling their internal staff/volunteers during these times? I've volunteered a few times and their safety guidelines were a little lax during normal times. I'm really hoping those places would be smart enough to... You know, be smart, but does anyone have any experience RECENTLY with their practices?

I'm halfway between volunteering and needing their services for myself, is why I wonder. If the next couple weeks don't go my way... Gonna be real sketchy for me...


Our church food give away is done outside.  Rain or shine.   We sort and  box in the parking lot, many others around here have gone to that.  Some have drive up service.
 
2020-12-01 2:37:56 PM  

FarkingSmurf: Percise1: My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.

That might be a liability issue.  People would donate it and people would take it and 99.99% of the time it would be safe.  But someone in that .01% that might get sick and just might sue.


I'm pretty sure that is the reason, and it does make sense, but it also means that some perfectly good food doesn't get to those who need it.

Oneiros: FarkingSmurf: Percise1: My only complaint is that food banks won't take food past it's date. I eat it... and I like to swap out my "earthquake larder" every few years, so there is some food that goes to waist for no good reason.

That might be a liability issue.  People would donate it and people would take it and 99.99% of the time it would be safe.  But someone in that .01% that might get sick and just might sue.

Some states actually have laws against this.  (shielding bakeries and such so they will donate their unsold goods rather than destroying them).

That doesn't mean that they can't be sued, but the odds of it being successful are very, very low.

A friend of mine said that it was a dignity thing, to tell people that they're only worth food that you wouldn't eat yourself.  (although, I'm okay with eating many foods past their "best by" date in general ... although there are a few things that are just nasty when old ... like pickles that have turned to mush, or anything with fats that have gone rancid)

But it would also suck to bring home something from the food bank, thinking that you have a meal for the night, only to find it's something that's gone off.

... oh, and it's also worth mentioning that this only seems to search their affiliated food banks.  I know there's one closer to me than the one that they had listed.  (a collaboration between many of the churches the area, but they only do distributions once a month)


Meh, I don't buy the dignity thing, because if your choice is between being hungry or eating donated food... "dignity" basically equals "false pride".
Like I said before, I've been down myself so I do know what it is like... and at that point, being picky isn't wise.
That said, I'm talking about things like cans of soup that are a few months past the "best by" date that I would (and do) happily eat myself, not some 7 year old granola bars or expecting people to eat moldy bread or whatever.
(I sometimes buy day old bread from a local bakery... it's just fine and a hell of a deal)

What really matters is that people try to help those less fortunate, be it by giving goods, money or time. It benefits all, and let's be honest, you never know when things could go to schitt and you are in need yourself. *shrug*
 
2020-12-01 5:13:01 PM  
I sent them a check today . Also have a bi monthly donation taken out of my pay .
 
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