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    More: Obvious, Tire, Automobile, Tires, Wheel, Tread, Michelin, season tires, TJ Campbell  
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593 clicks; posted to STEM » on 30 Nov 2020 at 3:36 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-11-30 4:00:22 PM  
"In some regions, all-season tires provide adequate traction for the winter months. But when you are dealing with real winter weather, all-season tires are a jack-of-all-trades and master of none," said TJ Campbell, tire information and testing manager for Tire Rack. "Nothing will provide safety and confidence for a driver in true winter weather conditions than a dedicated set of winter tires."

No potential conflict of interest there.

I've been using all-season radials for 30+ years, driving in upstate NY where we often get some serious snow storms, and I've never had a serious problem except in icing conditions, and no tires except maybe studded snows are going to help you then.  Maybe chains.

The idea is you slow down for the conditions and you'll get there eventually.   When I have to drive home from work in a snowstorm, it can sometimes take me 2 hours to go the 50 miles, maybe a little longer if it's really bad, but I take my time and I get there.

I'm looking forward to my first commute in the snow.  Every farkin' year, first commute after or during a snowstorm, I see several cars off the road.   Usually 4WD/AWD, too:  Morons who think that they can still do 70+ MPH because they've got all wheels applying power and they have anti-lock brakes and my favorite, "skid control".

First thing I do after the first snow, if I have the opportunity, is go to an empty parking lot and do a couple of skids and slides to remind myself what it's like, and to remember the way the car feels when it's about to lose it.
 
2020-11-30 5:11:26 PM  
I find one thing pretty funny about all these "are snow tires worth the cost" articles/discussions, and that is they leave out the fact that every mile you put on your snow tires is a mile you're not putting on your summer tires!  And snow tires generally are cheaper than summer or all-season tires, so taking out the cost of changeover and possibly extra rims, using snows could actually cost less in the long term.

Now of course rims aren't free, and changeovers aren't either if you have to pay someone to do them.  But I still find it odd that that aspect never seems to get mentioned.
 
2020-11-30 5:27:59 PM  
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2020-11-30 6:35:12 PM  

dittybopper: "In some regions, all-season tires provide adequate traction for the winter months. But when you are dealing with real winter weather, all-season tires are a jack-of-all-trades and master of none," said TJ Campbell, tire information and testing manager for Tire Rack. "Nothing will provide safety and confidence for a driver in true winter weather conditions than a dedicated set of winter tires."

No potential conflict of interest there.

I've been using all-season radials for 30+ years, driving in upstate NY where we often get some serious snow storms, and I've never had a serious problem except in icing conditions, and no tires except maybe studded snows are going to help you then.  Maybe chains.

The idea is you slow down for the conditions and you'll get there eventually.   When I have to drive home from work in a snowstorm, it can sometimes take me 2 hours to go the 50 miles, maybe a little longer if it's really bad, but I take my time and I get there.

I'm looking forward to my first commute in the snow.  Every farkin' year, first commute after or during a snowstorm, I see several cars off the road.   Usually 4WD/AWD, too:  Morons who think that they can still do 70+ MPH because they've got all wheels applying power and they have anti-lock brakes and my favorite, "skid control".

First thing I do after the first snow, if I have the opportunity, is go to an empty parking lot and do a couple of skids and slides to remind myself what it's like, and to remember the way the car feels when it's about to lose it.


I agree with this assessment with the same experience, but I would more strongly clarify that all seasons are perfectly fine in all snow conditions as long as you ALSO have AWD/4x4. If you're rocking a 2WD pickup, you better have studded snows with 400+ lbs in the bed; a FWD car, stay home if your tires are bald AF please. You'd be doing yourself, and the rest of us, a favor.

Ice is the mindkiller.

Though they usually salt pretty well or at least let the snow sit and give a bit of traction, where they know what they're doing in the highway dept.
 
2020-11-30 7:39:18 PM  

Ecliptic: dittybopper: "In some regions, all-season tires provide adequate traction for the winter months. But when you are dealing with real winter weather, all-season tires are a jack-of-all-trades and master of none," said TJ Campbell, tire information and testing manager for Tire Rack. "Nothing will provide safety and confidence for a driver in true winter weather conditions than a dedicated set of winter tires."

No potential conflict of interest there.

I've been using all-season radials for 30+ years, driving in upstate NY where we often get some serious snow storms, and I've never had a serious problem except in icing conditions, and no tires except maybe studded snows are going to help you then.  Maybe chains.

The idea is you slow down for the conditions and you'll get there eventually.   When I have to drive home from work in a snowstorm, it can sometimes take me 2 hours to go the 50 miles, maybe a little longer if it's really bad, but I take my time and I get there.

I'm looking forward to my first commute in the snow.  Every farkin' year, first commute after or during a snowstorm, I see several cars off the road.   Usually 4WD/AWD, too:  Morons who think that they can still do 70+ MPH because they've got all wheels applying power and they have anti-lock brakes and my favorite, "skid control".

First thing I do after the first snow, if I have the opportunity, is go to an empty parking lot and do a couple of skids and slides to remind myself what it's like, and to remember the way the car feels when it's about to lose it.

I agree with this assessment with the same experience, but I would more strongly clarify that all seasons are perfectly fine in all snow conditions as long as you ALSO have AWD/4x4. If you're rocking a 2WD pickup, you better have studded snows with 400+ lbs in the bed; a FWD car, stay home if your tires are bald AF please. You'd be doing yourself, and the rest of us, a favor.

Ice is the mindkiller.

Though they usually salt pretty well or at least let the snow sit and give a bit of traction, where they know what they're doing in the highway dept.


FWD is great in the snow, *IF* you aren't driving on slicks.  But I have done that when I was poor, and I made it.
 
2020-11-30 8:20:32 PM  

dittybopper: I've been using all-season radials for 30+ years, driving in upstate NY where we often get some serious snow storms, and I've never had a serious problem except in icing conditions, and no tires except maybe studded snows are going to help you then.


Um, that's what "winter tires" are.  Any tires that do not have metal points sticking out of them are summer tires.
 
2020-11-30 8:29:16 PM  

Ecliptic: I agree with this assessment with the same experience, but I would more strongly clarify that all seasons are perfectly fine in all snow conditions as long as you ALSO have AWD/4x4. If you're rocking a 2WD pickup, you better have studded snows with 400+ lbs in the bed; a FWD car, stay home if your tires are bald AF please. You'd be doing yourself, and the rest of us, a favor.

Ice is the mindkiller.

Though they usually salt pretty well or at lea ...


What do you have against FWD?  With FWD, you don't need 400+lbs in the bed because the engine, the heaviest part of the car, is directly over the drive wheels.  I have had much less skidding problems with front wheel drive cars than with rear wheel drive.  Of course, I put studded snow tires on all four wheels so that I can steer and stop even if two of those wheels are not providing propulsion.
 
2020-11-30 8:35:12 PM  

flondrix: dittybopper: I've been using all-season radials for 30+ years, driving in upstate NY where we often get some serious snow storms, and I've never had a serious problem except in icing conditions, and no tires except maybe studded snows are going to help you then.

Um, that's what "winter tires" are.  Any tires that do not have metal points sticking out of them are summer tires.


No. There are some pretty serious winter tires that don't have any metal sticking out of them. Blizzaks perform as well as metal studded tires and don't tear up the road. They aren't cheap, though.
 
2020-12-01 12:15:09 AM  
if the winter tires stop your car only 2 feet shorter than crappy all-season tires which shouldn't be driven in snow, then they are probably worth it.
 
2020-12-01 7:53:04 AM  
Also from upstate NY...

I do not disagree with anything you said, but I still put snows on one of the cars. One thing that folks do not often do when calculating the cost of snow tires is to consider that you are wearing out tires all the time, winter and summer. It is not as though snows doubles the price of your tires. Yes, snows wear a bit faster, and therefore cost a bit more per mile. I typically get 4-5 winters from Goodrich Blizzaks, and a corresponding increase in life of the summer tires. And also - you get to use real summer tires. Smoother, quieter, and generally better mileage than all weather radials. Just make sure they are off when the first snow flies!

With Blizzaks, I can plow light snow with the bumper of my front wheel drive sedan. Maybe you can do that with all-weather radials. Maybe you are smart enough to not try (with or without snows!)

TL;DR: Drive with care in the winter. To each his own with respect to tires.
 
2020-12-01 7:58:32 AM  

majestic: flondrix: dittybopper: I've been using all-season radials for 30+ years, driving in upstate NY where we often get some serious snow storms, and I've never had a serious problem except in icing conditions, and no tires except maybe studded snows are going to help you then.

Um, that's what "winter tires" are.  Any tires that do not have metal points sticking out of them are summer tires.

No. There are some pretty serious winter tires that don't have any metal sticking out of them. Blizzaks perform as well as metal studded tires and don't tear up the road. They aren't cheap, though.


Not to mention that studded tires are illegal in some places.
 
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