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(Vox)   No one understands dark matter   (vox.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Galaxy, Dark matter, dark night, Universe, dark matter, Vera Rubin, darkest places, normal matter  
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720 clicks; posted to STEM » on 30 Nov 2020 at 2:35 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-11-29 9:35:16 PM  
What about d0rk matter?  100% of my composition.
 
2020-11-29 9:39:27 PM  
It was a good show . Too bad it got canceled.
 
2020-11-29 9:39:48 PM  
That's ok. We didn't understand physics at one point, didn't understand algebra.

Nothing scary about learning.
 
2020-11-29 9:55:12 PM  
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2020-11-29 10:05:11 PM  
DNRTFA, but MOND actually makes a prediction about the scaling of galaxy rotation curves that DOES fit the data. Dark Matter makes no predictions. It's just the difference between what we see and what we expect. It can be tweaked to fit some CMB spectral data better. But it's far from the slam dunk that DM theorists would have you believe.
 
2020-11-29 11:11:13 PM  
Oooo, lets play a game: dark matter speculation!

I'll start: dark matter is matter that has a mass of zilch
 
2020-11-30 3:22:22 AM  

Captain Scratch: DNRTFA, but MOND actually makes a prediction about the scaling of galaxy rotation curves that DOES fit the data. Dark Matter makes no predictions. It's just the difference between what we see and what we expect. It can be tweaked to fit some CMB spectral data better. But it's far from the slam dunk that DM theorists would have you believe.


This isn't correct at all.

Various dark matter models make an absurd number of predictions.  For example, take the Lambda-CDM model of dark matter (the most popular dark matter model out there).  It makes a huge number of predictions about various observables.  The vast majority of those predictions have proven correct.  In terms of making predictions about large scale stuff in the universe, its a very successful theory.

The problem with MOND is that it has not been very successful in making predictions, which is why its rejected by the sizeable majority of astronomers (it was treated as something of a joke when I was in grad school).  While you can make MOND theories match a single set of observations (say rotation curves of galaxies), there doesn't seem to be a good way to make it match up with observations in different realms (say, the Bullet Cluster/gravitational lensing).

The few MOND people out there always desperately patch up the theory after major observations, but dark matter theories have predicted many of the observations ahead of time.  For example, observations of the Bullet Cluster naturally worked with pre-existing predictions from Dark Matter theories, while MOND had nothing.

The main problem with things like the Lambda-CDM model is that they often don't provide an identity for the particle or particles that make up dark matter.  They can give some of the properties of whatever makes up dark matter, but we can't point to a particle and say "this is the one".  Models that have tried to attribute dark matter to known particles have been pretty unsuccessful.
 
2020-11-30 4:05:37 AM  

Krazikarl: Captain Scratch: DNRTFA, but MOND actually makes a prediction about the scaling of galaxy rotation curves that DOES fit the data. Dark Matter makes no predictions. It's just the difference between what we see and what we expect. It can be tweaked to fit some CMB spectral data better. But it's far from the slam dunk that DM theorists would have you believe.

This isn't correct at all.

Various dark matter models make an absurd number of predictions.  For example, take the Lambda-CDM model of dark matter (the most popular dark matter model out there).  It makes a huge number of predictions about various observables.  The vast majority of those predictions have proven correct.  In terms of making predictions about large scale stuff in the universe, its a very successful theory.

The problem with MOND is that it has not been very successful in making predictions, which is why its rejected by the sizeable majority of astronomers (it was treated as something of a joke when I was in grad school).  While you can make MOND theories match a single set of observations (say rotation curves of galaxies), there doesn't seem to be a good way to make it match up with observations in different realms (say, the Bullet Cluster/gravitational lensing).

The few MOND people out there always desperately patch up the theory after major observations, but dark matter theories have predicted many of the observations ahead of time.  For example, observations of the Bullet Cluster naturally worked with pre-existing predictions from Dark Matter theories, while MOND had nothing.

The main problem with things like the Lambda-CDM model is that they often don't provide an identity for the particle or particles that make up dark matter.  They can give some of the properties of whatever makes up dark matter, but we can't point to a particle and say "this is the one".  Models that have tried to attribute dark matter to known particles have been pretty unsuccessful.


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2020-11-30 4:25:26 AM  
Ah, the dark matter. One of universe's truely not understood forms of matter. To whom no theory is truly worthly.
/It's what I do
 
2020-11-30 4:51:18 AM  
Obviously it's just hikikomori baryons.

Give it an empty room and some ero anime to watch and it will slowly emerge into visibility.

Duh.
 
2020-11-30 5:38:09 AM  
I understand it. Grade 7 costs 200 gil and repairs errything.
 
2020-11-30 5:59:15 AM  
Wouldnt it make sense if it was just antigravity particles? I mean without them the universe would likely be far more spread out than it is, because there is a very defined range to the effect of gravity, and unless something was activly acting as its opposite it would be far more difficult for the universe to form the way it did: large clusters of mass surrounded by vast distances of absolute emptiness
 
2020-11-30 6:19:15 AM  

educated: Nothing scary about learning.


Yeah, well you are obviously biased about that!
 
2020-11-30 7:39:03 AM  

cman: Oooo, lets play a game: dark matter speculation!

I'll start: dark matter is matter that has a mass of zilch


Dark matter is the reason I'm not a successful billionaire. Why if it wasn't for all that dark matter coming in and taking real matter's™ jobs, we'd probably be the most successful race in all the universe.
 
2020-11-30 8:08:11 AM  
Real question for those who know more than I.

Could dark matter be explained by virtual particles?  My understanding is that they normally annihilate each other very quickly (except when there's Hawking radiation at the event horizon of a black hole), but in that brief moment of existence they do have mass.  Could their cumulative effect explain dark matter?
 
2020-11-30 8:27:44 AM  
Simple really.  It's the pressure of whatever was in this space pushing back from before our dimension forced it's way in.
 
2020-11-30 8:43:01 AM  
Maybe there's just a bunch of matter that didn't form stars, and isn't lit up
 
2020-11-30 8:50:53 AM  

cman: Oooo, lets play a game: dark matter speculation!

I'll start: dark matter is matter that has a mass of zilch


Dark matter is where all the intelligent life is. They see us matter based creatures as schlubs.
 
2020-11-30 8:51:07 AM  
Dark matter is lost socks, pencils and any other small things that go missing.

I used to think that might also include neutrino detector pieces, but they were just "borrowed" by a dark matter experiment.
 
2020-11-30 8:56:42 AM  

OldJames: Maybe there's just a bunch of matter that didn't form stars, and isn't lit up


It also has to be transparent, or we would see it when it blocked light coming from behind it. That means it is not ordinary matter at all.
 
2020-11-30 8:58:22 AM  
I'm not a scientist or astrophysicist, nor can I lend any credibility to the theory, but I like to think of it as inter-dimensional matter. It's normal matter, just in another time plane. Our matter would be their dark matter. The theory itself is my own version of dark matter... it fills in the blank spots of my curiosity until someone can fill it in with fact... which will not be in my lifetime, so eh... inter-dimensional matter it is.
 
2020-11-30 11:19:24 AM  

IndyJohn: Real question for those who know more than I.

Could dark matter be explained by virtual particles?  My understanding is that they normally annihilate each other very quickly (except when there's Hawking radiation at the event horizon of a black hole), but in that brief moment of existence they do have mass.  Could their cumulative effect explain dark matter?


I can't really say I know more than you, but my understanding is that virtual particles can pretty much appear anywhere in the vacuum, so there's no reason they would accumulate around galaxies.
 
2020-11-30 11:49:05 AM  

Arkanaut: IndyJohn: Real question for those who know more than I.

Could dark matter be explained by virtual particles?  My understanding is that they normally annihilate each other very quickly (except when there's Hawking radiation at the event horizon of a black hole), but in that brief moment of existence they do have mass.  Could their cumulative effect explain dark matter?

I can't really say I know more than you, but my understanding is that virtual particles can pretty much appear anywhere in the vacuum, so there's no reason they would accumulate around galaxies.


My understanding is that virtual particles results from disturbances in the quantum field due to other matter, and so they should actually be more common around galaxies.

That said, I suspect there is already some explanation out there to shoot down my idea.  I am not a physicist and my understanding of this stuff does not run deep.
 
2020-11-30 1:27:01 PM  
It's Dust.
 
2020-11-30 3:42:01 PM  

revrendjim: OldJames: Maybe there's just a bunch of matter that didn't form stars, and isn't lit up

It also has to be transparent, or we would see it when it blocked light coming from behind it. That means it is not ordinary matter at all.


Check out this cool room, both made of and filled with exotic transparent matter.

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2020-11-30 4:14:23 PM  

COMALite J: It's Dust.


I have of late-but wherefore I know not-lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air-look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire-why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapors. What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world. The paragon of animals. And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust?
 
2020-11-30 7:16:06 PM  

mononymous: COMALite J: It's Dust.

I have of late-but wherefore I know not-lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises, and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory; this most excellent canopy, the air-look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire-why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapors. What a piece of work is a man! How noble in reason, how infinite in faculty! In form and moving how express and admirable! In action how like an angel, in apprehension how like a god! The beauty of the world. The paragon of animals. And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust?

Mine was a reference to Phillip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy which HBO is showing Book Two (The Subtle Knife) of now. In last Monday's episode, the physicist lady in "our" world is studying dark matter, which the protagonist Lyra from the "fantasy" world identifies as the mysterious "Dust," the nature of which is a key mystery and plot point of the entire series.

His Dark Matterials, get it?
 
2020-12-01 12:32:54 PM  
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