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(Guardian)   The sad final days of New York's coolest record store   (amp.theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Tribeca Film Festival, New York City, Record shop, Independent music, Music retailers, Film, Regina Spektor, Spillers Records  
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2448 clicks; posted to Fandom » and Business » on 27 Nov 2020 at 8:35 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-11-27 6:03:23 PM  
I was scrolling for something to watch and saw the documentary available on Amazon Prime, if you're looking to watch it.
 
2020-11-27 8:51:27 PM  
It truly is amazing how New Yorkers constantly act like they are the only ones that matter.

Gallery of Sound is still open. If you city losers can't keep enough people appreciative of the local music store, That tells the rest of us you aren't as great as you think you are.
 
2020-11-27 8:57:57 PM  
I guess someone gambled away the rent money in Atlantic City. Somebody call Liv Tyler!  Don't give up. There is still time.
 
2020-11-27 9:16:02 PM  

2fardownthread: I guess someone gambled away the rent money in Atlantic City. Somebody call Liv Tyler!  Don't give up. There is still time.





Good Lord that woman in that movie....

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-27 9:20:15 PM  

Thanks for the Meme-ries: 2fardownthread: I guess someone gambled away the rent money in Atlantic City. Somebody call Liv Tyler!  Don't give up. There is still time.

Good Lord that woman in that movie....

[Fark user image 200x233] [View Full Size image _x_]


I watched it last week! I even have the soundtrack, I love that movie so much. I saw it on TMN(!!) when it was released and I watch it at least twice a year since 1995.
 
2020-11-27 9:35:39 PM  
So... the people that worked there were dicks.

And somehow that makes it special?
 
2020-11-27 10:15:32 PM  
What do you call a pretentious hipster business that closes because people finally got tired of being weirdly condescendingly treated for no reason?  A good start.
 
2020-11-27 10:19:59 PM  

2fardownthread: I guess someone gambled away the rent money in Atlantic City. Somebody call Liv Tyler!  Don't give up. There is still time.


Not on Rick Manning da...
*Shakes tiny fist while being eaten by Gwar monster.

/Of course every farker has seen that movie.
 
2020-11-27 10:34:06 PM  

BlippityBleep: What do you call a pretentious hipster business that closes because people finally got tired of being weirdly condescendingly treated for no reason?  A good start.




Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-27 11:32:43 PM  
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2020-11-28 12:05:59 AM  
The House of Guitars is still open. Fake news.
 
2020-11-28 12:14:37 AM  
How many records per day would a records store have to move to be able to afford New York rent? The number is too damn high!
 
2020-11-28 1:34:30 AM  
Times, they are a changin'.
 
2020-11-28 1:56:52 AM  
It's always sad when a local landmark goes under.

BlippityBleep: people finally got tired of being weirdly condescendingly treated for no reason?


In my experience, most independent record shops have a clique element by default.  It's just an ingrained characteristic of the industry.  There's no reason to let it disrupt your own personal browsing experience.
 
2020-11-28 2:14:43 AM  
thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-28 3:10:26 AM  

frestcrallen: It's always sad when a local landmark goes under.

BlippityBleep: people finally got tired of being weirdly condescendingly treated for no reason?

In my experience, most independent record shops have a clique element by default.  It's just an ingrained characteristic of the industry.  There's no reason to let it disrupt your own personal browsing experience.


Was it a local landmark though? There were so many stores like this even in the mid 2000s in the general area, you usually sampled a few then picked a place and stuck to it so I've never even heard of it. Well if you're bridge and tunnel like me. I guess if you actually lived in the Village it would be easier to be familiar with each and every used record store.
 
2020-11-28 3:19:14 AM  

Boberella: Thanks for the Meme-ries: 2fardownthread: I guess someone gambled away the rent money in Atlantic City. Somebody call Liv Tyler!  Don't give up. There is still time.

Good Lord that woman in that movie....

[Fark user image 200x233] [View Full Size image _x_]

I watched it last week! I even have the soundtrack, I love that movie so much. I saw it on TMN(!!) when it was released and I watch it at least twice a year since 1995.


I have it. Sigh. I think on VHS. It is a fun movie. It is among those movies that I will hang onto because they will probably not make the next cut as far as media go. I was not very serious about saving movies until suddenly I could not find WILD IN THE STREETS anywhere. Someday someone will just forget it ever existed and POOF! it will disappear.

If you have EMPIRE RECORDS anyone, hang onto it everybody. And REALITY BITES. They are time capsules worth their weight in gold.
 
2020-11-28 3:36:19 AM  

IHadMeAVision: Was it a local landmark though? There were so many stores like this even in the mid 2000s in the general area, you usually sampled a few then picked a place and stuck to it so I've never even heard of it. Well if you're bridge and tunnel like me. I guess if you actually lived in the Village it would be easier to be familiar with each and every used record store.


Not native to the area, so I have no firsthand knowledge of the particular store or its specific influence/impact.  Or lack thereof.  The submitter was obviously a fan.

I was commenting more in a general way about urban landscapes being in a state of constant flux.  And music nerds who work in record shops and take out their life angst on laypeople.
 
2020-11-28 3:55:29 AM  

frestcrallen: Not native to the area, so I have no firsthand knowledge of the particular store or its specific influence/impact.  Or lack thereof.  The submitter was obviously a fan.

I was commenting more in a general way about urban landscapes being in a state of constant flux.  And music nerds who work in record shops and take out their life angst on laypeople.


I hate to say it but I think some bar and record store owners in "trendy" areas instruct their staff to be uber aloof because "it works" in some bizarre way. I've seen it mostly in Williamsburg, Brooklyn but I also saw it on vacation in whatever part of New Orleans Tulane is at.
 
2020-11-28 3:56:11 AM  
If it wasn't Tower Records, it was CRAP!

-Gen X, Loudly
 
2020-11-28 4:05:16 AM  

IHadMeAVision: frestcrallen: It's always sad when a local landmark goes under.

BlippityBleep: people finally got tired of being weirdly condescendingly treated for no reason?

In my experience, most independent record shops have a clique element by default.  It's just an ingrained characteristic of the industry.  There's no reason to let it disrupt your own personal browsing experience.

Was it a local landmark though? There were so many stores like this even in the mid 2000s in the general area, you usually sampled a few then picked a place and stuck to it so I've never even heard of it. Well if you're bridge and tunnel like me. I guess if you actually lived in the Village it would be easier to be familiar with each and every used record store.


Yes, it was a landmark. There were no other stores like it in the city. The selection was deep.
 
2020-11-28 4:11:41 AM  

IHadMeAVision: I hate to say it but I think some bar and record store owners in "trendy" areas instruct their staff to be uber aloof because "it works" in some bizarre way.


That's too meta for this humble music appreciator.  I guess small business owners are always angling for a magic formula, either in reality or in their own minds.  Preferably the former.

In normal times, if I do go into a brick and mortar music shop, I generally have a very focused idea of what I'm looking for.  Any staff interaction that does happen is peripheral to my search.  If I have to ask them anything, it's generally to do with their in-store indexing system, but that's all.

I know lots of people like personal interaction when they're shopping for something, but the internet has rendered much of that superfluous.  Especially with music.
 
2020-11-28 4:23:25 AM  
Someone somewhere suggested that cassettes would become the next hipster format. I looked around, and while the digital tape replicators still exist, but the one playback deck on the market is crap.

Analog records and playback is simple in comparison to tape decks. The best you might do is restore a good tape deck, what with the belts and fragile gears.
 
2020-11-28 4:36:44 AM  

Thunderboy: Yes, it was a landmark. There were no other stores like it in the city. The selection was deep.


I was mostly into punk as a teenager so some store I'm not even sure I know the name of anymore (think it was Revolution and it was among the college-townish shiat south of Washinton Square) was my go-to, as well as basically anywhere on St. Marks and some random spot on Long Island by the Broadway Mall in Hicksville called Utopia. Wonder if that last one still around. Obviously nothing punk rocky on St. Marks is still around.

That said the Tower Records on Broadway had an amazing collection of Classical and Jazz with shiat you'd never find at your local suburban Tower.
 
2020-11-28 5:35:10 AM  

sinner4ever: It truly is amazing how New Yorkers constantly act like they are the only ones that matter.

Gallery of Sound is still open. If you city losers can't keep enough people appreciative of the local music store, That tells the rest of us you aren't as great as you think you are.


It's a high concentration of good shiat from around the planet in a small area. At least it used to be that.
 
2020-11-28 6:17:43 AM  
I'm kinda surprised by people's reactions, it's almost like people on the internet never went to Other Music and chose to indulge in an insecure stereotype (Haha). Other Music, Aquarius, and record stores of similar ilk across the world, were temples of obscurity where obsessives like myself could indulge in sounds that were hard to find. Their reviews of bands made careers for artists that would have gone unnoticed in the mainstream. I never experienced condescension there, rather I experienced people who were as passionate as myself.

RIP Other Music & Aquarius, thank you for the good times.
 
2020-11-28 6:41:18 AM  

fragMasterFlash: If it wasn't Tower Records, it was CRAP!

-Gen X, Loudly


The original Tower on Queen Anne was genuinely awesome.

Easy Street Records is now the greatest record store in the known universe.
 
2020-11-28 8:24:34 AM  

wildcardjack: Someone somewhere suggested that cassettes would become the next hipster format. I looked around, and while the digital tape replicators still exist, but the one playback deck on the market is crap.

Analog records and playback is simple in comparison to tape decks. The best you might do is restore a good tape deck, what with the belts and fragile gears.


I don't know about hipster format, but there are still a bunch of punk and metal bands that release cassette copies of albums.

I bought two new ones last year.
Mostly just for the collector aspect of it as they're limited production.

/Also bought the limited vinyl presses of the same albums
 
2020-11-28 8:26:24 AM  

Thunderboy: IHadMeAVision: frestcrallen: It's always sad when a local landmark goes under.

BlippityBleep: people finally got tired of being weirdly condescendingly treated for no reason?

In my experience, most independent record shops have a clique element by default.  It's just an ingrained characteristic of the industry.  There's no reason to let it disrupt your own personal browsing experience.

Was it a local landmark though? There were so many stores like this even in the mid 2000s in the general area, you usually sampled a few then picked a place and stuck to it so I've never even heard of it. Well if you're bridge and tunnel like me. I guess if you actually lived in the Village it would be easier to be familiar with each and every used record store.

Yes, it was a landmark. There were no other stores like it in the city. The selection was deep.


So deep that it put her ass to sleep?
 
2020-11-28 8:55:21 AM  
I miss the 90s

i.gifer.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-28 8:57:25 AM  

sinner4ever: It truly is amazing how New Yorkers constantly act like they are the only ones that matter.

Gallery of Sound is still open. If you city losers can't keep enough people appreciative of the local music store, That tells the rest of us you aren't as great as you think you are.


Lol... Whut?
 
2020-11-28 9:25:38 AM  
I spent A LOT of time and money in this place, through the mid-90s and early 2000s, it was sad to see it go. I found hundreds of great CDs there.

The staff acted aloof and sometimes seemed a bit moody, but they were all just skinny music nerds. What was there to be scared of?

One guy gave me a shiatty, pretentious response once. As it turned out he didn't know as much about the musician as I did. Poor guy, being embarrassed like a common customer really ruined his day.
 
2020-11-28 9:28:30 AM  
Simian Mobile Disco - Hustler
Youtube I_64fZcttGg
 
2020-11-28 9:43:19 AM  
I used to go to a place just below Houston St in NYC during the early 2000's.

It was great, flying back and forth between Tulsa and NYC wasn't the easiest with a bunch of record's especially after 9/11, but it was worth it. DJ'ing at Crow bar, Monkey Bar, Black Betty's in Brooklyn, trying not to fall asleep on the L, getting off near at Graham Ave. That sexy girl I was hooking up with from Trinidad.  When buying drugs, 5 bags would get you 6 on a good day and it was always a good day.

Those were some good times.  Haven't been back in 10 years.  When my son gets about 3-4 years older, I'll take my kids to visit.

Don't want to waste my money on a 4 year old even though my 8 year old would love it.  She'll like it more as a 11-12 year old.
 
2020-11-28 9:43:46 AM  
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2020-11-28 9:56:39 AM  

2fardownthread: I have it. Sigh. I think on VHS. It is a fun movie. It is among those movies that I will hang onto because they will probably not make the next cut as far as media go. I was not very serious about saving movies until suddenly I could not find WILD IN THE STREETS anywhere. Someday someone will just forget it ever existed and POOF! it will disappear.

If you have EMPIRE RECORDS anyone, hang onto it everybody. And REALITY BITES. They are time capsules worth their weight in gold.



o_O

Empire Records is available on DVD and Blu-ray. You can upgrade from VHS.
 
2020-11-28 9:57:49 AM  
Forgot to mention that Reality Bites is available on DVD and Blu-ray as well.
 
2020-11-28 10:22:12 AM  
I enjoyed the Other Music doc. It left me wistful for my college and post-college days, when me and my music geek friends would dig through bins and find under-the-radar gems. Specifically, it made me think of when we picked up copies of Spilt Milk by the band Jellyfish, and we were convinced we had the coolest record that nobody knew about.

We still exchange music digitally (we're a bunch of indie rock, prog, and metal geeks), but it's not the same as being in a record store and making cool finds.
 
2020-11-28 11:46:08 AM  

IHadMeAVision: Thunderboy: Yes, it was a landmark. There were no other stores like it in the city. The selection was deep.

I was mostly into punk as a teenager so some store I'm not even sure I know the name of anymore (think it was Revolution and it was among the college-townish shiat south of Washinton Square) was my go-to, as well as basically anywhere on St. Marks and some random spot on Long Island by the Broadway Mall in Hicksville called Utopia. Wonder if that last one still around. Obviously nothing punk rocky on St. Marks is still around.

That said the Tower Records on Broadway had an amazing collection of Classical and Jazz with shiat you'd never find at your local suburban Tower.


So there's no confusion, there were plenty of great record stores around the city and the villages in particular, but they each had their own place in the order of things. Any big city Tower was indeed a good bet for classical and jazz, but if I were looking for fringe stuff like Glenn Branca, Keiji Haino, or whatever, OM was the spot.
 
2020-11-28 12:58:43 PM  
I would have said Bleecker Bob's held that title
 
2020-11-28 1:10:18 PM  
Funny I don't remember a store when the best buggy whip store closed in NYC.
 
2020-11-28 2:59:59 PM  

IHadMeAVision: Thunderboy: Yes, it was a landmark. There were no other stores like it in the city. The selection was deep.

I was mostly into punk as a teenager so some store I'm not even sure I know the name of anymore (think it was Revolution and it was among the college-townish shiat south of Washinton Square) was my go-to, as well as basically anywhere on St. Marks and some random spot on Long Island by the Broadway Mall in Hicksville called Utopia. Wonder if that last one still around. Obviously nothing punk rocky on St. Marks is still around.

That said the Tower Records on Broadway had an amazing collection of Classical and Jazz with shiat you'd never find at your local suburban Tower.


I loved that Tower Records, exactly for those reasons (and loads of Zappa).  Spent a lot of time there and at Other Music across the street.
 
2020-11-28 11:30:22 PM  

Englebert Slaptyback: 2fardownthread: I have it. Sigh. I think on VHS. It is a fun movie. It is among those movies that I will hang onto because they will probably not make the next cut as far as media go. I was not very serious about saving movies until suddenly I could not find WILD IN THE STREETS anywhere. Someday someone will just forget it ever existed and POOF! it will disappear.

If you have EMPIRE RECORDS anyone, hang onto it everybody. And REALITY BITES. They are time capsules worth their weight in gold.


o_O

Empire Records is available on DVD and Blu-ray. You can upgrade from VHS.


I was in seventh grade, and a very attractive pair of eighth grade girls who lusted after me showed me a little trick with their shared paperback copy of "Go Ask Alice." You see, after reading it cover to cover, you can go back and find the good parts simply by looking for places where the back of the book is broken. The good parts.

I know that Empire Records is out on DVD and BluRay, and even on Amazon Prime for free until a few weeks ago. But a special feature of VHS tapes is that you can find not only the good parts, but what everyone else thinks were the good parts. It is not a bug of the medium, but a feature. So when you get Fast Times at Ridgemont High on VHS and you watch its grainy goodness and all of a sudden the screen goes wavy, you KNOW that the scene where Phoebe Cates says HI BRAD........ is coming up soon.

Same deal for a lot of other movies. Sometimes, the medium is the message. And there is some irony in having Reality Bites on BluRay that I just will not get into.

Aside from that, we are entering a new era of ephemeral culture. The sheer amount of music and movies is not enough to consume in real time or even in recent time. A lot of stuff is going to disappear. Time capsule movies such as Barbarella, Zardoz, Wild in the Streets, Go Ask Alice, Fast Times, Empire Records, Lords of Dogtown, might get one printing on DVD and BluRay and then be gone forever. I am not going to count heavily on someone else appreciating the stuff I appreciate. Stuff is going to start disappearing.

And maybe that is just me. And the greater the degree to which it "is just me," the more this opinion justifies itself. In other words, if my obduracy surprises you, then it is more likely that I won't be able to convince you not to push the button to eliminate the last remaining VHS copy of Faster Pussycat, Kill Kill.
 
2020-11-29 1:40:22 AM  

Thunderboy: So there's no confusion, there were plenty of great record stores around the city and the villages in particular, but they each had their own place in the order of things. Any big city Tower was indeed a good bet for classical and jazz, but if I were looking for fringe stuff like Glenn Branca, Keiji Haino, or whatever, OM was the spot.


Good point.
 
2020-11-29 3:16:49 AM  

BlippityBleep: What do you call a pretentious hipster business that closes because people finally got tired of being weirdly condescendingly treated for no reason?  A good start.


I'm not even seeking the approval of my friends. Why should I want to impress a salesman ?
 
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