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(Guardian)   Yeah, that's an odd book title alright   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Silly, Middle Ages, Heavy metal music, Classical antiquity, Paul Newman, Venn diagram, Bookseller/Diagram Prize for Oddest Title of the Year, The Bookseller, Diagram prize  
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1990 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 27 Nov 2020 at 4:16 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



11 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-11-27 6:36:50 AM  
Pfft. Amateurs.
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2020-11-27 7:44:16 AM  
Chuck Tingle wasn't in the running this year?
 
2020-11-27 7:47:35 AM  
And here we were worrying about publishers being bought up.
 
2020-11-27 9:42:25 AM  
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2020-11-27 9:51:53 AM  
FTFA: "Both books are academic studies, with the winning title by University of Alberta anthropologist Gregory Forth. It sees Forth look at how the Nage, an indigenous people primarily living on the islands of Flores and Timor, understand metaphor, and use their knowledge of animals to shape specific expressions."

So ...

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2020-11-27 10:31:30 AM  
Real book: I Called Him Babe: Elvis Presley's Nurse Remembers
 
2020-11-27 4:13:38 PM  
 
2020-11-27 6:05:31 PM  
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2020-11-28 12:00:45 AM  

Slypork: Chuck Tingle wasn't in the running this year?


His titles aren't odd anymore - Chuck's become a part of what constitutes normal now.

/we could do a lot worse
 
2020-11-28 2:35:36 AM  

batlock666: FTFA: "Both books are academic studies, with the winning title by University of Alberta anthropologist Gregory Forth. It sees Forth look at how the Nage, an indigenous people primarily living on the islands of Flores and Timor, understand metaphor, and use their knowledge of animals to shape specific expressions."

So ...

[i.pinimg.com image 601x800]


I assume more like "crabs in a bucket" or "you can lead a horse to water" kinda stuff.

I feel like in English we have a lot of animal-related metaphors/cliches but they're usually related to how we use animals rather than how they behave. Cart before the horse. Straw that broke the camel's back. Straight out the gate. Wearing blinders. Fark you and the horse you rode in on. How's the view up there on your high horse. Back in the saddle. Rein somebody in. Damn. English do love horses.
 
2020-11-28 2:56:12 AM  
University of Alberta anthropologist Gregory Forth

Woo! Edmonton represent!
 
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