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1636 clicks; posted to Sports » on 27 Nov 2020 at 3:35 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-11-26 10:20:18 PM  
Original Tweet:

 
2020-11-27 3:38:52 AM  
There's a Division of Suck right there.
 
2020-11-27 3:49:56 AM  
It's unlikely that anyone in that division is going to win another game (except against each other) so the count has pretty much stopped.

Meanwhile, a team in the NFC west is probably going to finish 12-4 and not even win their division.
 
2020-11-27 6:24:26 AM  
Hehe, well played. :)
 
2020-11-27 7:29:04 AM  
That's just plain old funny.
 
2020-11-27 7:39:44 AM  

The Third Man: There's a Division of Suck right there.


Not even the old Titanic Division in the NBA was that bad.
 
2020-11-27 8:10:36 AM  
they've had years under all the current ownership groups where this division collectively was an absolute powerhouse.  But, well, sometimes out of spite, rather than win you just want to strip New England of their special teams coach.
 
2020-11-27 9:09:31 AM  

The Third Man: There's a Division of Suck right there.


THIS!
 
2020-11-27 9:41:48 AM  
Ah, the NFC East.  Backing in 8-8 teams to the divisional round since 2002.
 
2020-11-27 9:53:08 AM  
haha very nice. not as funny as the division though. hot damn that's turrible. championship merch sales for whichever team wins should be a laugh too.
 
2020-11-27 10:04:44 AM  

VisualiseThis: Ah, the NFC East.  Backing in 8-8 teams to the divisional round since 2002.


The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2002: Eagles 12-4
2003: Eagles 12-4
2004: Eagles 13-3 and end up losing the Super Bowl
2005: Giants 11-5
2006: Eagles 10-6
2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2008: Giants 12-4
2009: Dallas 11-5
2010: Eagles 10-6
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2012: Washington 10-6
2013: Eagles 10-6
2014: Cowboys 12-4
2015: Washington 9-7
2016: Cowboys 13-3
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions
2018: Cowboys 10-6
2019: Eagles 9-7

So in 18 seasons, exactly none of the NFC East champion teams were worse than 9-7, many of them winning 12 or 13 games.

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.

Everyone is laughing at the division this year because this will be the first time in decades that someone wins it with a below .500 record.
 
2020-11-27 10:10:58 AM  

Eddie Hazel's E string: VisualiseThis: Ah, the NFC East.  Backing in 8-8 teams to the divisional round since 2002.

The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2002: Eagles 12-4
2003: Eagles 12-4
2004: Eagles 13-3 and end up losing the Super Bowl
2005: Giants 11-5
2006: Eagles 10-6
2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2008: Giants 12-4
2009: Dallas 11-5
2010: Eagles 10-6
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2012: Washington 10-6
2013: Eagles 10-6
2014: Cowboys 12-4
2015: Washington 9-7
2016: Cowboys 13-3
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions
2018: Cowboys 10-6
2019: Eagles 9-7

So in 18 seasons, exactly none of the NFC East champion teams were worse than 9-7, many of them winning 12 or 13 games.

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.

Everyone is laughing at the division this year because this will be the first time in decades that someone wins it with a below .500 record.


Hey, Washington could win the rest of their games to win the division with a record of 9-7!

/Lulz
//Yeah right
///3s
 
2020-11-27 10:20:47 AM  

smd31: Hey, Washington could win the rest of their games to win the division with a record of 9-7!

/Lulz
//Yeah right
///3s


Haha, no one seems to be able to beat teams from outside the division, but WFT has some weapons in Gibson and McLaurin, plus a promising D. Crazier things have happened!
 
2020-11-27 10:39:15 AM  
The Giants would LEAD THIS DIVISION, BY A LOT if you throw away the bad PI (non-)calls

/ okay, they'd be 4-6
// they still suck
/// slashies
 
2020-11-27 10:42:51 AM  
A division full of losers, and you are the head loser
 
2020-11-27 11:06:33 AM  
I'm going to drop a note here.

I think Washington could get streaky going into the playoffs.
 
2020-11-27 11:07:12 AM  
Eddie Hazel's E string (edited):
The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.


I can absolutely give you credit for 2007 and 2017. But 2011 seems dodgy. In that year, the other NFC division champions were 15-1 (Green Bay), 13-3 (New Orleans), and 13-3 (San Francisco). There were two 10-6 NFC teams that didn't win their divisions (Atlanta and Detroit). The fact that the Giants made the playoffs at all that year was a bit of a fluke.

Of course, the Giants then went on to beat the 10-6 Falcons, the 15-1 Packers, the 13-3 49ers, and the 13-3 Patriots; that's impressive. And the NFC Easy wasn't the most statistically bizarre division that year; that honor would go to the 2011 AFC West, which was definitely in the running for Most Relentlessly Mediocre Performance, with 3 8-8 teams (Denver, San Diego, and wherever the heck the Raiders were playing that year), and one 7-9 team (the Chiefs).

Of course, that whole year was somewhat statistically weird, with a lot of
 
2020-11-27 11:20:05 AM  
He only has four fingers so he has to stop at four wins...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-27 11:21:56 AM  

mariner314: I'm going to drop a note here.

I think Washington could get streaky going into the playoffs.


Well they have a QB that was the first overall pick in the draft and a DL who was the second, so what's not to like?
/jk

/Tho Terry Mclaurin is something special, Gibbs may be, and Sweat is proving to be the steal of the draft
 
2020-11-27 12:09:48 PM  
That is farking brilliant, with the standings.  Works on so many levels.
 
2020-11-27 12:15:56 PM  

Eddie Hazel's E string: VisualiseThis: Ah, the NFC East.  Backing in 8-8 teams to the divisional round since 2002.

The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2002: Eagles 12-4
2003: Eagles 12-4
2004: Eagles 13-3 and end up losing the Super Bowl
2005: Giants 11-5
2006: Eagles 10-6
2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2008: Giants 12-4
2009: Dallas 11-5
2010: Eagles 10-6
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2012: Washington 10-6
2013: Eagles 10-6
2014: Cowboys 12-4
2015: Washington 9-7
2016: Cowboys 13-3
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions
2018: Cowboys 10-6
2019: Eagles 9-7

So in 18 seasons, exactly none of the NFC East champion teams were worse than 9-7, many of them winning 12 or 13 games.

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.

Everyone is laughing at the division this year because this will be the first time in decades that someone wins it with a below .500 record.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-27 12:28:39 PM  

KickahaOta: Eddie Hazel's E string (edited):
The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.

I can absolutely give you credit for 2007 and 2017. But 2011 seems dodgy. In that year, the other NFC division champions were 15-1 (Green Bay), 13-3 (New Orleans), and 13-3 (San Francisco). There were two 10-6 NFC teams that didn't win their divisions (Atlanta and Detroit). The fact that the Giants made the playoffs at all that year was a bit of a fluke.

Of course, the Giants then went on to beat the 10-6 Falcons, the 15-1 Packers, the 13-3 49ers, and the 13-3 Patriots; that's impressive. And the NFC Easy wasn't the most statistically bizarre division that year; that honor would go to the 2011 AFC West, which was definitely in the running for Most Relentlessly Mediocre Performance, with 3 8-8 teams (Denver, San Diego, and wherever the heck the Raiders were playing that year), and one 7-9 team (the Chiefs).

Of course, that whole year was somewhat statistically weird, with a lot of


A 9-7 division winner could indicate either a really strong division or a weak one. You'd have to look at the teams records outside the division to know. Since they play each other 6 times during the year, if the teams are about even and all strong, you'd expect each team to have 3 losses from within the division. This is exactly what happened. Their other4 losses came from Seattle (mediocre team at best. Giants probably shouldn't have lost this one), 49ers, Packers and Saints. Those last three has very strong years.

So while they had a marginal win record, they also played a very difficult schedule. It wasn't a fluke they won the Superb Owl.
 
2020-11-27 1:02:45 PM  
Aww, they got rid of it.  I now get "tweet is unavailable."
 
2020-11-27 1:44:34 PM  
Did anyone get a screenshot of it? I want to send it to a friend of mine.
 
2020-11-27 1:54:48 PM  

tedduque: KickahaOta: Eddie Hazel's E string (edited):
The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.

I can absolutely give you credit for 2007 and 2017. But 2011 seems dodgy. In that year, the other NFC division champions were 15-1 (Green Bay), 13-3 (New Orleans), and 13-3 (San Francisco). There were two 10-6 NFC teams that didn't win their divisions (Atlanta and Detroit). The fact that the Giants made the playoffs at all that year was a bit of a fluke.

Of course, the Giants then went on to beat the 10-6 Falcons, the 15-1 Packers, the 13-3 49ers, and the 13-3 Patriots; that's impressive. And the NFC Easy wasn't the most statistically bizarre division that year; that honor would go to the 2011 AFC West, which was definitely in the running for Most Relentlessly Mediocre Performance, with 3 8-8 teams (Denver, San Diego, and wherever the heck the Raiders were playing that year), and one 7-9 team (the Chiefs).

Of course, that whole year was somewhat statistically weird, with a lot of

A 9-7 division winner could indicate either a really strong division or a weak one. You'd have to look at the teams records outside the division to know. Since they play each other 6 times during the year, if the teams are about even and all strong, you'd expect each team to have 3 losses from within the division. This is exactly what happened. Their other4 losses came from Seattle (mediocre team at best. Giants probably shouldn't have lost this one), 49ers, Packers and Saints. Those last three has very strong years.

So while they had a marginal win record, they also played a very difficult schedule. It wasn't a fluke they won the Superb Owl.


Yeah, it was. They got like 7 turnovers against the Packers (and the Packers didn't bother covering a Giants WR in the end zone at the end of the 1st half for the easiest TD when there was no risk of any other play being made that I've ever seen) and would've lost the 49ers game if the 49ers punt returner didn't fumble/muff TWO punts.

Eli Manning's postseason career is the epitome of "It's better to be lucky than good."
 
2020-11-27 3:51:50 PM  

neritz: Did anyone get a screenshot of it? I want to send it to a friend of mine.


The internet never forgets.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-27 5:41:18 PM  

IAmRight: tedduque: KickahaOta: Eddie Hazel's E string (edited):
The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.

I can absolutely give you credit for 2007 and 2017. But 2011 seems dodgy. In that year, the other NFC division champions were 15-1 (Green Bay), 13-3 (New Orleans), and 13-3 (San Francisco). There were two 10-6 NFC teams that didn't win their divisions (Atlanta and Detroit). The fact that the Giants made the playoffs at all that year was a bit of a fluke.

Of course, the Giants then went on to beat the 10-6 Falcons, the 15-1 Packers, the 13-3 49ers, and the 13-3 Patriots; that's impressive. And the NFC Easy wasn't the most statistically bizarre division that year; that honor would go to the 2011 AFC West, which was definitely in the running for Most Relentlessly Mediocre Performance, with 3 8-8 teams (Denver, San Diego, and wherever the heck the Raiders were playing that year), and one 7-9 team (the Chiefs).

Of course, that whole year was somewhat statistically weird, with a lot of

A 9-7 division winner could indicate either a really strong division or a weak one. You'd have to look at the teams records outside the division to know. Since they play each other 6 times during the year, if the teams are about even and all strong, you'd expect each team to have 3 losses from within the division. This is exactly what happened. Their other4 losses came from Seattle (mediocre team at best. Giants probably shouldn't have lost this one), 49ers, Packers and Saints. Those last three has very strong years.

So while they had a marginal win record, they also played a v ...


They lost the Packers in the regular season by 3, scoring 35 points. In the playoffs, they scored 37. So the score in the playoffs wasn't a fluke. The Packers blew it. The Giants outscored them.

They lost to the 49ers in the regular season 27-20. In the playoffs, they won 20-17, once again demonstrating their consistency against the same team. The Giants outscored them.

The score is the only arbiter of who wins. If that is because one team screws up or because the other team dominates, the winning team has the higher score. Period. Calling it a fluke, or luck, when they were consistently performing at that level in all 4 games is just sour grapes.
 
2020-11-27 5:51:20 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: neritz: Did anyone get a screenshot of it? I want to send it to a friend of mine.

The internet never forgets.

[Fark user image image 850x478]


Thanks a bunch!
 
2020-11-27 5:53:00 PM  

neritz: common sense is an oxymoron: neritz: Did anyone get a screenshot of it? I want to send it to a friend of mine.

The internet never forgets.

[Fark user image image 850x478]

Thanks a bunch!


Ditto, I sent it to my Steelers fan sister who lives outside of Houston.
 
2020-11-28 10:05:47 AM  

tedduque: IAmRight: tedduque: KickahaOta: Eddie Hazel's E string (edited):
The division is GARBAGE this year, but you're offering quite the revisionist history.

2007: Cowboys 13-3 - Giants win Super Bowl as Wild Card team
2011: Giants 9-7 - Super Bowl Champions
2017: Eagles 13-3 - Super Bowl Champions

In this 18 season stretch, the division produced the Super Bowl winner 3 times. There are 8 divisions in the NFL, so that's better than would statistically be expected if each division had an equal chance to produce the SB champion.

I can absolutely give you credit for 2007 and 2017. But 2011 seems dodgy. In that year, the other NFC division champions were 15-1 (Green Bay), 13-3 (New Orleans), and 13-3 (San Francisco). There were two 10-6 NFC teams that didn't win their divisions (Atlanta and Detroit). The fact that the Giants made the playoffs at all that year was a bit of a fluke.

Of course, the Giants then went on to beat the 10-6 Falcons, the 15-1 Packers, the 13-3 49ers, and the 13-3 Patriots; that's impressive. And the NFC Easy wasn't the most statistically bizarre division that year; that honor would go to the 2011 AFC West, which was definitely in the running for Most Relentlessly Mediocre Performance, with 3 8-8 teams (Denver, San Diego, and wherever the heck the Raiders were playing that year), and one 7-9 team (the Chiefs).

Of course, that whole year was somewhat statistically weird, with a lot of

A 9-7 division winner could indicate either a really strong division or a weak one. You'd have to look at the teams records outside the division to know. Since they play each other 6 times during the year, if the teams are about even and all strong, you'd expect each team to have 3 losses from within the division. This is exactly what happened. Their other4 losses came from Seattle (mediocre team at best. Giants probably shouldn't have lost this one), 49ers, Packers and Saints. Those last three has very strong years.

So while they had a marginal win record, they also played a v ...

They lost the Packers in the regular season by 3, scoring 35 points. In the playoffs, they scored 37. So the score in the playoffs wasn't a fluke. The Packers blew it. The Giants outscored them.

They lost to the 49ers in the regular season 27-20. In the playoffs, they won 20-17, once again demonstrating their consistency against the same team. The Giants outscored them.

The score is the only arbiter of who wins. If that is because one team screws up or because the other team dominates, the winning team has the higher score. Period. Calling it a fluke, or luck, when they were consistently performing at that level in all 4 games is just sour grapes.


"It's not a fluke that a mediocre team beat better teams!"

*Points out several statistically extremely unlikely series of events that led to their wins*

"Their losses were close, so the fact that the absurdly rare things that went their way in the postseason games proves that they were the better team!"

Good argument.
 
2020-11-28 11:29:44 AM  
What you quoted is a strawman, But nice try. I said the team with the higher score wins. I don't know why you have a stick up your ass about the Giants winning, but get over it.

Your argument is that a mediocre team got lucky three times in a row. I'm guessing you play the lottery, too, figuring this next time surely has to be a winner.
 
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