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(SFGate)   There's nothing like sitting down to enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving dinner. But what was it like 70 years ago? Let's take a look. Dear God   (sfgate.com) divider line
    More: Sick, Cooking, Gelatin dessert, Recipe, Tomato, Cream, connoisseur of vintage recipes, Celia Sack, Salad  
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1731 clicks; posted to Food » on 25 Nov 2020 at 5:20 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-11-25 5:14:11 PM  
The reason people weren't fat back then is because the food tasted like shiat.
 
2020-11-25 5:27:35 PM  
"Carefully, I selected a beverage, a main course, a salad and a dessert. I skipped the turkey - I'm mostly vegetarian, which I'm willing to ignore for the novelty of a savory Jell-O, but not lax enough to dig into a bird carcass."

Strike-through provided by yours truly because TFA writer was too smug to do so.
 
2020-11-25 5:29:33 PM  
Cracked did a series of these gross old recipes 10 years ago. It was during their golden years and they are a fun read.
 
2020-11-25 5:30:12 PM  

WordsnCollision: "Carefully, I selected a beverage, a main course, a salad and a dessert. I skipped the turkey - I'm mostly vegetarian, which I'm willing to ignore for the novelty of a savory Jell-O, but not lax enough to dig into a bird carcass."

Strike-through provided by yours truly because TFA writer was too smug to do so.


Seems they also skipped the stuffing, mashed potatoes, succotash, carrots, cranberry sauce , pumpkin pie which have been part of a traditional Thanksgiving for the last century.

It's just so edgy when they pick and choose obscure books put out by companies who wish to sell more of their own products.
 
2020-11-25 5:30:28 PM  
Yeah. Right. Everybody only ate disgusting food back then.

She could have picked delicious recipes from the 50s, but how would that titillate her moronic readers?
 
2020-11-25 5:31:16 PM  

BunkyBrewman: Seems they also skipped the stuffing, mashed potatoes, succotash, carrots, cranberry sauce , pumpkin pie which have been part of a traditional Thanksgiving for the last century.


Gee that sounds like TG 70 years ago but wait, that can't be right, we only ate disgusting food.
 
2020-11-25 5:46:24 PM  
I'm chuckling at the "but, but, traditional foods".

Sometime in the 60s I graduated from being a little kid to the youngest female in the kitchen.  The men sat in the living room watching football, while all the women worked in the kitchen making the big feast,  Hmmmm...maybe that's one of the reasons I'm not fond of big holiday dinners.   The two dining  tables put together for the big spread was filled with different foods, all made by hours of labor by the womenfolk.

Both of my grandmothers did make a jello salad.***  I did love them both.  One a green jello salad with cottage cheese and if I remember right, maybe pineapple.  The other was a ground up raw cranberry, fresh orange, celery and nuts in some red jello.  That is actually pretty damn good and I still make it sometimes.

***There was a movie in the 90s "Out There", a silly but fun film about aliens and other weirdos.  There was a scene, a community potluck or something.  There was a whole table devoted to green jello salads.  That one shot had me rolling, because it was so true.

So is aspic okay, though?
 
2020-11-25 5:59:29 PM  

flucto: Yeah. Right. Everybody only ate disgusting food back then.

She could have picked delicious recipes from the 50s, but how would that titillate her moronic readers?


I don't know why your taking it so personally.

In the post war years, as middle class disposable income increased and big corporations grew up and modern branding and advertising developed, some people tried to invent new American cuisine to sell products. A lot of them were super gross. Its funny now.

Women in my family tend to live long. I've had many Thanksgivings with women who grew up in the depression and before. I've never heard a single one of them long for those corporate constructed canned tuna and jello abominations.
 
2020-11-25 6:01:47 PM  

Dewey Fidalgo: I'm chuckling at the "but, but, traditional foods".

Sometime in the 60s I graduated from being a little kid to the youngest female in the kitchen.  The men sat in the living room watching football, while all the women worked in the kitchen making the big feast,  Hmmmm...maybe that's one of the reasons I'm not fond of big holiday dinners.   The two dining  tables put together for the big spread was filled with different foods, all made by hours of labor by the womenfolk.

Both of my grandmothers did make a jello salad.***  I did love them both.  One a green jello salad with cottage cheese and if I remember right, maybe pineapple.  The other was a ground up raw cranberry, fresh orange, celery and nuts in some red jello.  That is actually pretty damn good and I still make it sometimes.

***There was a movie in the 90s "Out There", a silly but fun film about aliens and other weirdos.  There was a scene, a community potluck or something.  There was a whole table devoted to green jello salads.  That one shot had me rolling, because it was so true.

So is aspic okay, though?


No. No it isn't.

It does kind of speak to how much shiat has changed though. The whole concept of "let the wimins cook", which carried on into the early 90s with my grandparents and I'm sure still does to this day in some places is just an odd concept to me now. I like chatting with friends and crushing beers while cooking, even pressing them into service for help. Only if they wanted though. Hell even home design has morphed away from this with the whole open kitchen design concept that is in every house built after 2000.

Sorry your experiences sucked so bad. I've always enjoyed cooking all day for as many people as was feasible. In college I'd hook it up fat for my friends. The international students loved it. Now that I'm remembering there was more than one year when someone said "Dude, let's get a keg", right in the middle of cooking and we had an impromptu Thanksgiving kegger.

Wonderful times.
 
2020-11-25 6:07:31 PM  
Grandma used to make this gelatin molded thing out of lime jello, cottage cheese, raisins, and shredded carrots.
There may have been other ingredients as well, I don't remember.

Anyway, it was actually pretty tasty.
 
2020-11-25 6:09:11 PM  
I don't think a tomato jelly necessarily has to be bad. If you had a slice of tomato and beef bouillon gelatin underneath a foie gras, I think it might be pretty good.
 
2020-11-25 6:10:43 PM  

NINEv2: we had an impromptu Thanksgiving kegger.


I'm sure Grandpa and Grandma just loved that.

I'm talking about family Thanksgivings and holidays, with several generations (I've been fortunate to have had one with 5 generations and 4 generations is not uncommon to this day).

It is "fun" to poke fun at the "awful" foods that were showed up as women wanted to get the fark out of the kitchen for the whole day (who do you think did the dishes, too?).   To be part of the party.   I think that was a good point in the article.

I do get a chuckle out of the trend of deep frying turkeys (and the subsequent FARK articles that follow), or any BBQ.  Now that is when the menfolk step up.
 
2020-11-25 6:11:29 PM  
The recipe calls for cutting the prunes small, but she dumped them into her pie whole.

Maybe cooking isn't for this person.
 
2020-11-25 6:16:15 PM  

We Ate the Necco Wafers: I don't think a tomato jelly necessarily has to be bad. If you had a slice of tomato and beef bouillon gelatin underneath a foie gras, I think it might be pretty good.


Animal flesh naturally makes "aspic".  Any time you pull a cold hunk of meat from the fridge, that "jelly" is a kind of aspic.   I've even boiled salmon heads to get a natural jelly.
 
2020-11-25 6:19:52 PM  
s.hdnux.comView Full Size


Recipes like this one are why your great-grandma assumed an undercover identity when they got married.

Who the f*ck was Mrs. John V Hamer?  It's better that we never know.
 
2020-11-25 6:24:08 PM  

Dewey Fidalgo: NINEv2: we had an impromptu Thanksgiving kegger.

I'm sure Grandpa and Grandma just loved that.

I'm talking about family Thanksgivings and holidays, with several generations (I've been fortunate to have had one with 5 generations and 4 generations is not uncommon to this day).

It is "fun" to poke fun at the "awful" foods that were showed up as women wanted to get the fark out of the kitchen for the whole day (who do you think did the dishes, too?).   To be part of the party.   I think that was a good point in the article.

I do get a chuckle out of the trend of deep frying turkeys (and the subsequent FARK articles that follow), or any BBQ.  Now that is when the menfolk step up.


I admit, that first line made me chuckle. Grandma and Grandpa would've kicked my ass for doing that during a family dinner. The tday kegger only happened 2 or 3 times, and it was usually just (fairly) mellow and chill. Friends or friends of friends from the immediate group only, ~30-40 people. Food, booze, music, movies, card games, and BSing. A hookup or two on the side as well.

I also kind of miss the days when my roommates and I could say. "Bars tonight?". Someone else would say "Nah, broke". And then the brilliant idea of "get a barrel?" would come up and we'd get loaded for free. Call up de friends, $3 cups... Super good times.

/favorite drinking game: "You honk, we drink".
//CSB?
///yeahyeah I know. Grow up.
 
2020-11-25 6:36:08 PM  

Bonzo_1116: [s.hdnux.com image 850x565]

Recipes like this one are why your great-grandma assumed an undercover identity when they got married.

Who the f*ck was Mrs. John V Hamer?  It's better that we never know.


Many of these old, horrible recipes were created and promulgated by the companies making the product.

Fark user imageView Full Size

/appetizing...
 
2020-11-25 6:56:03 PM  
I still remember Sunday dinners with my gran beginning with a demitasse cup of beef consumme, garnished with a lemon slice and the jelled tomato salad with herbed mayonnaise.  Next up would be either a rib eye roast or a pork crown roast, along with potatoes, a couple of vegetables and the meal would be finished with either pie or cake and a selection of cookies to go with coffee or tea.  When she became to frail to spend a day and a half preparing and cooking the meal, the duty went to me.

It wasn't until I was an adult, at brunch with my husband's sister and her husband, that I realized gran's jelled tomato salad was based on the bloody Mary.
 
2020-11-25 7:02:51 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


I do not think it a coincidence that a lot of these culinary horrors stopped around the same time the US banned open-air / above-ground nuclear testing.
 
2020-11-25 7:15:06 PM  

Therion: [Fark user image image 640x433]

I do not think it a coincidence that a lot of these culinary horrors stopped around the same time the US banned open-air / above-ground nuclear testing.


I'd eat that, if I had a bottle of Tabasco or Crystal handy.

Mostly because I have a really high salt tolerance.
 
2020-11-25 7:18:37 PM  

Dewey Fidalgo: I'm chuckling at the "but, but, traditional foods".

Sometime in the 60s I graduated from being a little kid to the youngest female in the kitchen.  The men sat in the living room watching football, while all the women worked in the kitchen making the big feast,  Hmmmm...maybe that's one of the reasons I'm not fond of big holiday dinners.   The two dining  tables put together for the big spread was filled with different foods, all made by hours of labor by the womenfolk.

Both of my grandmothers did make a jello salad.***  I did love them both.  One a green jello salad with cottage cheese and if I remember right, maybe pineapple.  The other was a ground up raw cranberry, fresh orange, celery and nuts in some red jello.  That is actually pretty damn good and I still make it sometimes.

***There was a movie in the 90s "Out There", a silly but fun film about aliens and other weirdos.  There was a scene, a community potluck or something.  There was a whole table devoted to green jello salads.  That one shot had me rolling, because it was so true.

So is aspic okay, though?


Growing up we had that same green jello salad & the red one.  We also had one that was an oreo crust on top (but it wasn't a jello pie with an oreo pie crust).
 
2020-11-25 7:26:06 PM  

RolandTGunner: Bonzo_1116: [s.hdnux.com image 850x565]

Recipes like this one are why your great-grandma assumed an undercover identity when they got married.

Who the f*ck was Mrs. John V Hamer?  It's better that we never know.

Many of these old, horrible recipes were created and promulgated by the companies making the product.

[Fark user image 751x278]
/appetizing...


HORK!

That would be a fine addition to Lilek's Gallery of Regrettable Food.
 
2020-11-25 7:58:47 PM  

Therion: [Fark user image 640x433]

I do not think it a coincidence that a lot of these culinary horrors stopped around the same time the US banned open-air / above-ground nuclear testing.


I'm not seeing the badness here.

Macaroni and cheese stuffed with hot dogs? The fat kid in me is squeeing with joy.
 
2020-11-25 8:12:37 PM  

Autumn Moone: We also had one that was an oreo crust on top (but it wasn't a jello pie with an oreo pie crust).


My mom made something like that.  I remember sraping the white center out of Hydrox cookies which she would crush.  The filling was some kind of gelatin mousse, I think egg whites were involved maybe.  The filling was snow white anyway.   The hydrox was crumbled in the dish before the filling was poured in and then more cookie crumbs covered the top. Then it was chilled.  I though that was soooo fancy.   It was  pretty good, too.   But at the time, we were reduced to eating baloney for dinner, so getting something like that was living high for us.
 
2020-11-25 8:19:23 PM  
The Joy of Cooking was published in 1936. It brought the how-to of good food to average Americans. The rich always had staff to do that. My mother, a genuine angel on this earth, was a terrible cook, but my mother-in-law, a harrigan in many ways, used that book and was a superb cook. Her oyster stuffing was great. There is no way to make turkey great; it's inherently not flavorful, but the side dishes is where good cooks shine.
 
2020-11-25 8:20:16 PM  
James May's Wobbly Jelly Pasta Baby | Oh Cook
Youtube vCN7KUS0Sx4
 
2020-11-25 8:23:54 PM  

WordsnCollision: "Carefully, I selected a beverage, a main course, a salad and a dessert. I skipped the turkey - I'm mostly vegetarian, which I'm willing to ignore for the novelty of a savory Jell-O, but not lax enough to dig into a bird carcass."

Strike-through provided by yours truly because TFA writer was too smug to do so.


Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.
 
2020-11-25 8:35:22 PM  
If you charged 250 a person at the trendy California Restaurant and called it "Retro Night"
You'd have people lined up out the door.

Bonus points if you served it in 1960's lunch boxes with most of the dishes wrapped in wax paper with a signature cocktail in the Thermos.

/Also I seriously want to do this for dinner party.
 
2020-11-25 8:43:03 PM  

FormlessOne: Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.


All of this is correct.

BUT... my mother and grandmothers all still fell for the evils that were canned vegetables, and that weird cranberry jelly shiat, and tried to pass all of these things off as edible during Thanksgiving.

Luckily, "fruit and marshmallow jello salad" was the only gelatin around.
 
2020-11-25 8:47:57 PM  

Magnanimous_J: flucto: Yeah. Right. Everybody only ate disgusting food back then.

She could have picked delicious recipes from the 50s, but how would that titillate her moronic readers?

I don't know why your taking it so personally.

In the post war years, as middle class disposable income increased and big corporations grew up and modern branding and advertising developed, some people tried to invent new American cuisine to sell products. A lot of them were super gross. Its funny now.

Women in my family tend to live long. I've had many Thanksgivings with women who grew up in the depression and before. I've never heard a single one of them long for those corporate constructed canned tuna and jello abominations.


I don't know why you're taking it as an opportunity to pontificate.
 
2020-11-25 8:54:30 PM  

puffy999: FormlessOne: Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.

All of this is correct.

BUT... my mother and grandmothers all still fell for the evils that were canned vegetables, and that weird cranberry jelly shiat, and tried to pass all of these things off as edible during Thanksgiving.

Luckily, "fruit and marshmallow jello salad" was the only gelatin around.


I enjoy canned vegetables, and I'm having that "weird cranberry jelly shiat" tomorrow. They're quite edible.
 
2020-11-25 8:55:55 PM  

FormlessOne: I enjoy canned vegetables, and I'm having that "weird cranberry jelly shiat" tomorrow. They're quite edible.


user name checks out.
 
2020-11-25 8:58:24 PM  
Seriously, it's bizarre to read this kind of crap, knowing full well how well things like gelatin, canned vegetables, and such are when prepared well. Your grandparents & parents weren't somehow having to reluctantly muscle these foods down a resisting gullet just because they were ignorant savages, unaware of the beauty of spatchcocking or avocado farking toast.

Folks who act as though eating a canned vegetable was somehow beneath them bother me, because so many people in this country have little else to eat and still readily give thanks to those very items.

It's almost as if we've forgotten the damned point.
 
2020-11-25 9:03:20 PM  

FormlessOne: puffy999: FormlessOne: Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.

All of this is correct.

BUT... my mother and grandmothers all still fell for the evils that were canned vegetables, and that weird cranberry jelly shiat, and tried to pass all of these things off as edible during Thanksgiving.

Luckily, "fruit and marshmallow jello salad" was the only gelatin around.

I enjoy canned vegetables, and I'm having that "weird cranberry jelly shiat" tomorrow. They're quite edible.


Canned cranberry sauce is fine if you just put it in a nice dish and mash it up so it doesn't look like the can anymore.
 
2020-11-25 9:13:19 PM  

FormlessOne: WordsnCollision: "Carefully, I selected a beverage, a main course, a salad and a dessert. I skipped the turkey - I'm mostly vegetarian, which I'm willing to ignore for the novelty of a savory Jell-O, but not lax enough to dig into a bird carcass."

Strike-through provided by yours truly because TFA writer was too smug to do so.

Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.


One of my 'welcome to Fark' moments happened early in my visits to this site when I pointed out that a couple of self-proclaimed experts in Victorian life were essentially bad cosplay modern boneheaded smug misinterpretation experts was met with great anger. This brings back memories of that exchange. FWIW,you're absolutely correct.
 
2020-11-25 9:18:19 PM  

puffy999: FormlessOne: Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.

All of this is correct.

BUT... my mother and grandmothers all still fell for the evils that were canned vegetables, and that weird cranberry jelly shiat, and tried to pass all of these things off as edible during Thanksgiving.

Luckily, "fruit and marshmallow jello salad" was the only gelatin around.


The reason our mothers and grandmothers relied on canned vegetables was that back in the 50s and 60s, you could only get fresh vegetables in season. The supply chain of Imported produce did not yet exist, so canned vegetables were the only way of ensuring a supply of vegetables in the off season, especially winter.,

Jello salad was definitely a staple of holiday tables, potluck, church picnics and the like, and yes, it was uniformly disgusting.
 
2020-11-25 10:11:35 PM  

knbwhite: FormlessOne: puffy999: FormlessOne: Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.

All of this is correct.

BUT... my mother and grandmothers all still fell for the evils that were canned vegetables, and that weird cranberry jelly shiat, and tried to pass all of these things off as edible during Thanksgiving.

Luckily, "fruit and marshmallow jello salad" was the only gelatin around.

I enjoy canned vegetables, and I'm having that "weird cranberry jelly shiat" tomorrow. They're quite edible.

Canned cranberry sauce is fine if you just put it in a nice dish and mash it up so it doesn't look like the can anymore.


The ridges are what makes it classy!
 
2020-11-25 10:33:31 PM  
Idk. I feel like the article was a bit tongue and cheek. Like. She's a writer in San fransisco who's socially forbidden from having a real Thanksgiving this year. So she had a small gathering and made some rather crappy foods that would make for both readable and easy writing. That said. It's good she's cute cause she sure cant cook.

I remember so many jello salad things at church potlucks. Not all of them bad. Ambrosia salad i think qualifies as a jello salad and that stuff is pretty tasty. There was always one with a bunch of peas floating around in it I was always to nervous to try.

Regarding canned cranberry sauce. Cranberry sauce is literally just weak ass jam. It's just sugar and cranberries and a few spices. Canned stuff is fine. I actually leave it can shaped sometimes cause it's fun to take a slice off.

People should be aware. Canned food CAN suck. But not always. Frozen and canned foods are processed very near to their harvest so they tend to be fresh. Just cooked.

I was watching chopped the other day and one contestant got a can of mushroom soup mix and was biatching cause he just NEVER eats anything out of a can. biatch. Its cream and mushrooms and flour and salt that's just been boiled down. You own a food truck. Your entire work life is cooking. You would rather spend an hour dicing mushrooms and cooking sauce for a casserole on your of time? Instead of spending time with your kids or wife? Jeez. What an asshole.

Cans arent bad. You just need to know how to work what's in em.
 
2020-11-25 10:43:36 PM  
Canned jellied cranberries were the only jellied item my mother ever presented, and it was presented in can shape because slicing a slice off was much neater. To this day, it's the only form of cranberry that I enjoy.

My mother was 100% Italian and an awesome home chef. She never made bad food, regardless of what she cooked. She could make canned spinach not only edible but delicious. She also had to use "stand in" food a lot because we were military and moved all over. It was not possible for her to find the ingredients she needed most of the time.

I'm lucky because I watched my mother, I cooked with and for my mother, and she did pass down most of her recipes to me. I ended up being a really good cook, too, because of that. I tried to pass that on to my daughter, but she has ADHD and no interest in or love for cooking, so our family recipes and traditions die with me. Her hubby does most of the cooking and he's good, so she's not suffering.

My mother told me about cooking for her in-laws (my grandparents on my dad's side and his siblings). She was horrified when her MIL gave her spaghetti with ketchup as an Italian treat, so she decided she would cook Eggplant Parmesan for them to show them what real Italian food was like. She was stood there at the stove frying the eggplant slices to build the dish with later while everyone was standing or sitting around watching her. When she was finished, she turned around and all the piles of fried eggplant slices were gone! They had eaten them as she fried them, and loved them, not realizing that wasn't the dish!
 
2020-11-26 3:20:21 AM  

JZDave: RolandTGunner: Bonzo_1116: [s.hdnux.com image 850x565]

Recipes like this one are why your great-grandma assumed an undercover identity when they got married.

Who the f*ck was Mrs. John V Hamer?  It's better that we never know.

Many of these old, horrible recipes were created and promulgated by the companies making the product.

[Fark user image 751x278]
/appetizing...

HORK!

That would be a fine addition to Lilek's Gallery of Regrettable Food.


came here for this although you should have linked :P
 
2020-11-26 3:21:53 AM  

BorgiaGinz: puffy999: FormlessOne: Never mind the fact that it sounds like every dish the writer served was prepared & handled poorly, or that the products referenced in the pamphlets she used have changed formulation, some multiple times, since they were originally issued, or that the writer had no clue how to understand the recipes within the context of the time period in which they were concocted. And, as indicated, she chose at least one of the three recipes because it was referred to her as the "best vile recipe."

Finally, her expert analysis was that this was representative of a '50s Thanksgiving...?

I have no time for this kind of bullshiat. Disingenuous, ill-equipped, smug farkheads alleging shiat about which they know little to nothing have done incredible amounts of damage - this year in particular - and I'll have no truck with it.

All of this is correct.

BUT... my mother and grandmothers all still fell for the evils that were canned vegetables, and that weird cranberry jelly shiat, and tried to pass all of these things off as edible during Thanksgiving.

Luckily, "fruit and marshmallow jello salad" was the only gelatin around.

The reason our mothers and grandmothers relied on canned vegetables was that back in the 50s and 60s, you could only get fresh vegetables in season. The supply chain of Imported produce did not yet exist, so canned vegetables were the only way of ensuring a supply of vegetables in the off season, especially winter.,

Jello salad was definitely a staple of holiday tables, potluck, church picnics and the like, and yes, it was uniformly disgusting.


Yup, make do with what you have.

But now we have fresh-frozen green beans instead of the truly nasty canned greenbeans.
 
2020-11-26 3:37:11 AM  

silvervial: Canned jellied cranberries were the only jellied item my mother ever presented, and it was presented in can shape because slicing a slice off was much neater.


Does not compute. To me that would be like slicing gravy or jelly.
 
2020-11-26 5:52:21 AM  
Married a Romanian. Savory aspic is a thing and it is awesome.
 
2020-11-26 7:23:40 AM  
The pie looks pretty good.
 
2020-11-26 12:42:24 PM  

RolandTGunner: Grandma used to make this gelatin molded thing out of lime jello, cottage cheese, raisins, and shredded carrots.
There may have been other ingredients as well, I don't remember.

Anyway, it was actually pretty tasty.


yeah, my grandmother made more or less the same thing - lime jello, grated carrots, and on special occasions such as holidays, shredded iceberg lettuce. ogod I think hers did have raisins too, I must have repressed that until you mentioned. and there was no choice about eating the "salad" - you had to. *shivers*


silvervial: Canned jellied cranberries were the only jellied item my mother ever presented, and it was presented in can shape because slicing a slice off was much neater. To this day, it's the only form of cranberry that I enjoy.


I didn't really grow up with them, but I'm pretty ok with the taste! actually, dammit now I want some!

my first year away at school, I'd made a good friend or two in Das Deutsches Haus (ha ha, suck it, denizens of ginormous towerblock tenement dorms) and one of them kindly offered to share Thanksgiving with him and his mother. she made the entire spread from scratch, the whole 9 yards. everything was great, but I particularly remember the cranberry sauce was amazeballs, I think she boiled down the cranberries in orange juice, spices, and sugar. might have been some blueberries in there too.

but holy-wow was it ever tart! and I don't mean in a bad way, the stuff was delicioso. just that every time I took a bite, my face would involuntarily go into contortions. so naturally she thought I hated it but was being polite, and so every time I made that face, her face would get incrementally even more sad.

this is also the origin of the curse, "time for pie?" - she'd made almost every kind of pie imaginable - apple, cherry, rhubarb, strawberry, pumpkin, lemon meringue, chocolate cream, coconut cream, pecan. over that 4 day weekend my friend and I used it as a greeting/ritual/mantra any time we saw each other - time for pie? and the rule was, if someone said that, anyone in the room was required by law to eat at least 1 more slice of pie. I was only 18 at the time, and for once in my life a serious athlete, so we managed to demolish every single one of those, ah tell you whut.

only time I've ever been to  Darkest Western Mass. it is a strange place, like Lovecraft minus the seashore.

man, now I want coconut cream pie. I'll likely make one, but have to resist fancy-ing it up. the comfort pie of my childhood involves: coconut Jello pudding, gently folded with coolwhip to double size, even moar coolwhip on top, sprinkled lightly with sweetened shredded coconut. in an ice water + butter + shortening crust.
 
2020-11-26 1:15:24 PM  
I have to admit I was disappointed that the Fallout Cookbook didn't have any aspic recipes.

We need to get on that.
 
2020-11-26 1:46:08 PM  

flucto: Yeah. Right. Everybody only ate disgusting food back then.

She could have picked delicious recipes from the 50s, but how would that titillate her moronic readers?


There were no delicious recipes from the 50s.  There was only pot roast.
 
2020-11-26 3:42:02 PM  
Ive always liked everything that was on our thanksgiving table except one- the cranberry jello ring with orange and lemon peel and nuts in it. Mom made it every year cause it was dads favorite. Dad passed in 2008, she kept making it. People took a slice out of respect for dad but didnt eat it. Then came the year that she made it and nobody took any, and she commented on it. I stepped up and said "mom, im being honest, it was always dad's favorite, but it's really bitter to eat, everybody took some out of respect for dad. No disrespect to either of you, but nobody really likes it". Trooper my mom is, she said "thanks for speaking your mind for everyone son, and ill come up with something else next time". This is a few years back, she"ll be a hundred years young next year and doesnt cook anymore after doing the family dinner for the better part of seventy years...btw i love a slice of cran right out of the can...
 
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