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(BBC-US)   UK energy company tests program to allow electric cars to serve as power banks for homes. It's sort of like charging your laptop with your phone   (bbc.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, pilot scheme, BBC News, Electric vehicle, electric car owners, energy company OVO, Automobile, BBC Click's Lara Lewington, Electric charge  
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222 clicks; posted to STEM » and Main » on 25 Nov 2020 at 12:03 PM (14 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Funniest)
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2020-11-25 11:04:22 AM  
6 votes:
I get it now. ...

The house plugs in to the car for power. Then you plug the car in to the house to keep it charged!

Brilliant!
 
2020-11-26 3:39:41 PM  
2 votes:
So sad. They're missing a trick by not equipping the houses with regenerative brakes.
 
2020-11-25 11:29:24 AM  
1 vote:
In 2006 we stayed at a small tourist compound/B&B in Kent and they had a pretty big battery array in a closet. I had never seen anything like it in the US, but they explained that with energy prices being so high, it was a system that paid for itself within a few years (especially with multiple buildings). The battery would charge from 9pm to 5am or something like that, then supplement the grid throughout the day as needed.

Sounds like this is just a clever workaround for people with EVs, but the cost of a mistake seems pretty high.

"Sorry, boss, I'm going to be a few hours late. My house ate my car battery."
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2020-11-25 10:21:54 AM  
1 vote:
Decide you want to take a drive in late afternoon and find your car is discharged because the grid bought the "excess" power.
 
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