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(WSBTV)   Jupiter, Saturn come together in rare planetary alignment. Surprisingly Uranus not involved   (wsbtv.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Planet, Dwarf planet, Sun, closer alignment, Neptune, night sky, Saturn, Earth  
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451 clicks; posted to STEM » on 25 Nov 2020 at 11:15 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-11-25 8:21:03 AM  
Don't be so sure, Subby.   You don't know what I have planned for that night.
 
2020-11-25 9:33:26 AM  

Devolving_Spud: Don't be so sure, Subby.   You don't know what I have planned for that night.


With enough wine and lube, anything is possible.
 
2020-11-25 9:57:46 AM  

weddingsinger: With enough wine and lube, anything is possible.


Sounds like a Land Rover Owner's Club garage day t-shirt.
 
2020-11-25 10:20:47 AM  
I'm looking at Uranus right now, subby!
 
2020-11-25 11:58:07 AM  
They are pretty low in the sky right now. You don't get that much time between sundown and when they go over the horizon. The light pollution where I live is to the southwest, so the viewing won't be spectacular. I'll still get the telescopes out in December, but pictures will be crap unless I get in the car and drive an hour.
 
2020-11-25 12:17:43 PM  
Just because something is rare doesn't mean it's interesting, or even special.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson Planetary Alignment
Youtube b_fANoaWkYM
 
2020-11-25 12:19:07 PM  
Oberon, Miranda and Titania were unavailable for comment, as were Neptune and Titan.

/obscure?
 
2020-11-25 12:28:25 PM  

GregoryD: Just because something is rare doesn't mean it's interesting, or even special.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/b_fANoaW​kYM]


Seeing two planets at once through a telescope with your own eyes is pretty damned special to me.

I've been debating getting a camera for my scope, and this may be what pushes me over the edge to do it.  Having a picture of the two together that I took myself would be really cool.
 
2020-11-25 12:31:13 PM  

GregoryD: Just because something is rare doesn't mean it's interesting, or even special.

[YouTube video: Neil DeGrasse Tyson Planetary Alignment]


Could be the end of the world. Or the beginning.
 
2020-11-25 12:35:50 PM  

NikolaiFarkoff: weddingsinger: With enough wine and lube, anything is possible.

Sounds like a Land Rover Owner's Club garage day t-shirt.


Their motto is "Meet Us On Uranus"
 
2020-11-25 12:38:15 PM  
So the closest conjunction will look like a very bright star to the naked eye.
Just before December 25.
Repeat!
 
2020-11-25 12:38:55 PM  
And, uh, speaking of astrophotography cameras, anyone have any suggestions?

I have a Celestron 6SE, and would probably only be doing lunar and planetary photos, nothing deep space.  I'm probably not looking for the "great for beginners" class, but also probably not looking for the "this is what the practically professional amateurs use" either.
 
2020-11-25 12:55:27 PM  
First Monolith in Utah and now this..
 
2020-11-25 1:25:29 PM  
Is this the part where we ask why we are up the tower from which a tree obscures the view and discover it's because the Queen has given birth to a son and we must therefore flee the palace at once?
 
2020-11-25 2:45:53 PM  

madgonad: They are pretty low in the sky right now. You don't get that much time between sundown and when they go over the horizon. The light pollution where I live is to the southwest, so the viewing won't be spectacular. I'll still get the telescopes out in December, but pictures will be crap unless I get in the car and drive an hour.


You all should go look at them. Easy and impressive.  I've been going for walks around sunset, and Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn have all been really visible if it's not cloudy. My latitude's about 37.5, northern California.

They're typically the first "stars" to come out, before the sky gets dark enough to see the rest of them.
No telescopes required, though it helps to have my reading glasses on to cut down on the astigmatism.
Mars is distinctly reddish (well, kinda orange, not deep red.)

I'll probably get my telescope out at some point, but it's the kind where the optics are mainly designed for looking good on the mantel and coordinating with pirate costumes, yarr, or at most steampunk; I'll have to see if any of the binoculars I've got work any better, since it's been a while since I've seen Saturn's rings or Jupiter's moons.
 
2020-11-26 1:33:10 AM  
Interesting factoid: Pluto/Charon will join the conjunction as well. It's already quite close to Saturn.
 
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