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(Forbes)   Tired of claims like "300 million potentially habitable planets exist?" Turns out we don't know enough to agree on what "potentially habitable" means   (forbes.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, Planet, Solar System, Milky Way, Galaxy, Universe, Earth, known world, extraterrestrial life  
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241 clicks; posted to STEM » on 25 Nov 2020 at 5:05 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-11-25 2:19:09 AM  
The World's Greatest Consulting Detective, his bowels clenched!
 
2020-11-25 2:25:20 AM  
Something near 1 G of gravity, and some air pressure would be a rather bare minimum.
 
2020-11-25 2:36:23 AM  
I wanna go on a cruise like CRD Riker and just slam-ass all over the galaxy. Blue titties, green titties, more than two titties... I'm in.
 
2020-11-25 3:25:03 AM  
Hmm. What's with the articles all of a sudden implying that there is no life in the universe but earth. Popular mechanics, Forbes.
 
2020-11-25 3:25:27 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 3:35:22 AM  

sithon: Hmm. What's with the articles all of a sudden implying that there is no life in the universe but earth. Popular mechanics, Forbes.


It goes in waves. Like seasonal depression.  They're sad and see an empty void and theorize it as such.

Me... always the optimist, sees an endless universe of titties and society binding together to invent magical, fantastical technology to break the laws of phsyics to traverse space and time eo see what it's like to plow a three-tittied reptile descended chick with a blue vaj.
 
2020-11-25 3:35:40 AM  
Minshara class. They're everywhere!
 
2020-11-25 3:36:08 AM  
And yet, you can find statements made all the time akin to the one that went viral just a few weeks ago:that there are 300 million potentially habitable planets right here in the Milky Way galaxy

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 3:42:50 AM  

Cubansaltyballs: sithon: Hmm. What's with the articles all of a sudden implying that there is no life in the universe but earth. Popular mechanics, Forbes.

It goes in waves. Like seasonal depression.  They're sad and see an empty void and theorize it as such.

Me... always the optimist, sees an endless universe of titties and society binding together to invent magical, fantastical technology to break the laws of phsyics to traverse space and time eo see what it's like to plow a three-tittied reptile descended chick with a blue vaj.


In the pilot episode of Babylon 5, the station commander took a moment to warn a human male away from a certain alien female.  'What, are you a bigot or something?'  No, but that particular race eats their mates afterwards.
 
2020-11-25 5:15:42 AM  
More words about a less important or factually based topic it would be hard to find, with the exception of religion.
 
2020-11-25 5:41:51 AM  

Cubansaltyballs: sithon: Hmm. What's with the articles all of a sudden implying that there is no life in the universe but earth. Popular mechanics, Forbes.

It goes in waves. Like seasonal depression.  They're sad and see an empty void and theorize it as such.

Me... always the optimist, sees an endless universe of titties and society binding together to invent magical, fantastical technology to break the laws of phsyics to traverse space and time eo see what it's like to plow a three-tittied reptile descended chick with a blue vaj.


True immersive simulation is going to be cheaper and not break laws of physics.

You can have what you want, just not the way you want it.
 
2020-11-25 6:12:52 AM  

sithon: Hmm. What's with the articles all of a sudden implying that there is no life in the universe but earth. Popular mechanics, Forbes.


Just because there's no intelligence at Forbes doesn't mean intelligence doesn't exist in xenos.
 
2020-11-25 6:31:49 AM  
Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mindbogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

Sums it all up really.
 
2020-11-25 6:42:12 AM  
This is case of simply not being able to accept uncertainty.

No amount of handwringing and speculation and computations can inform us sufficiently to put a number on the probability of alien life.
Infinity divided by 1000 is still infinity.
 
2020-11-25 6:44:12 AM  
Sounds like subby doesn't know what "potentially" means.
 
2020-11-25 7:32:59 AM  
THE EXPANSE on Amazon Prime will blow your mind.

I do not think we are that far from finding life supporting conditions in many places throughout this solar system, let alone the galaxy. This is probably the order in terms of quality of life: Space Stations, Moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, Earth trojans, Mars trojans, Asteroids, Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, Jupiter Minor moons, Titan, Saturn minor moons, Venus, and even way out in the Kuiper Belt are some planetoids with a lot of what humans need. It all looks very harsh, but there are ways to manage it. You can see that the list above more or less conforms to "distance from Earth." That will not always be the case, but until Mars really gets going, humans will call Earth home.

Earth is a huge gravity hole. We need a base on the moon or at a Lagrange point to gather materials to move out farther into the solar system.

It is going to be tough to live on the surface of a lot of these places because of radiation at both ends of the spectrum, so humans will have to dig or shield themselves somehow. Gravity can be created by spinning an asteroid or space station. Given a decent amount of lead time, humans can create good habitats by digging into surfaces and then capping them off and getting atmospheres inside. Small nuclear power units can provide sufficient power for warmth. Solar can provide a lot of electricity.

If Musk wanted to take 50 billion and do a stretch program with volunteers, I think you could have a sustainable moon base in four years. Then he would have to fight it out with everyone else for squatters' rights. Or he could take 25 billion and capture his own asteroid and do whatever the hell he wants with it. I propose the establishment of an evil lair.

By the time humans move out beyond the solar system, I would bet that over 50 rocks and planets will have been colonized and mined, with more or less independent human settlements on 7 or 8 of them.
 
2020-11-25 7:37:40 AM  
This planet is 'habitable' because life made it habitable.  Which, ironically, would pretty much put any habitable planet on a 'do not touch' list.  Ecological cross-contamination between such planets would be a catastrophe.
 
2020-11-25 7:42:20 AM  

Alphax: Something near 1 G of gravity, and some air pressure would be a rather bare minimum.


Hmm. Necessary but not sufficient? Mars, Venus, Io, Europa, Callisto, Titan... and of course Earth.

Mars has nearly zero air pressure, but decent gravity.

Venus has almost perfect gravity, but lead melts on the surface, and the atmosphere is acid. HOWEVER, if you could invent some acid proof balloons, you could float indefinitely above the heat and nastiness and have great temperatures AND some air pressure.

Jupiter moon gravity is not too bad, but too cold on the surface. If you burrow down far enough, you can get liquid water at the right temperature, maybe. But the radiation from Jupiter will cook you on Io and Europa. Callisto is far enough from Jupiter, but you will have to stay on the far side to avoid getting cooked.

Titan? Hmm. Just too cold.

So we take care of Earth or learn to tread water. It is that simple. For the time being. Or we make a space station that can replicate your 1 G and atmosphere on a huge scale.
 
2020-11-25 8:13:19 AM  

2fardownthread: Venus has almost perfect gravity, but lead melts on the surface, and the atmosphere is acid. HOWEVER, if you could invent some acid proof balloons, you could float indefinitely above the heat and nastiness and have great temperatures AND some air pressure.


I'll never understand the appeal behind living in sky balloons on Venus.

- Any materials you want to use to construct your floating city have to be imported, either from space or the planet's surface (and its not clear which of those is the more difficult proposition).

- If the planet is ever actually terraformed, your floating cities will be a casualty of the process.

- Winds can exceed 200 mph, so you need to build things pretty robustly.

- Can't go outside, and If something goes wrong with your balloons, you are pretty farked.

Its all the disadvantages of living on a space station, combined with all the disadvantages of living inside a gravity well.
 
2020-11-25 8:48:26 AM  

yohohogreengiant: Cubansaltyballs: sithon: Hmm. What's with the articles all of a sudden implying that there is no life in the universe but earth. Popular mechanics, Forbes.

It goes in waves. Like seasonal depression.  They're sad and see an empty void and theorize it as such.

Me... always the optimist, sees an endless universe of titties and society binding together to invent magical, fantastical technology to break the laws of phsyics to traverse space and time eo see what it's like to plow a three-tittied reptile descended chick with a blue vaj.

True immersive simulation is going to be cheaper and not break laws of physics.

You can have what you want, just not the way you want it.


Well, yeah. Of course we'll invent holodecks. But that'll keep the people docile while us thrill seekers go in search of the real thing and maybe... just maybe a NEW thing.

Boldly go, mfers.
 
2020-11-25 9:02:54 AM  

Animatronik: This is case of simply not being able to accept uncertainty.

No amount of handwringing and speculation and computations can inform us sufficiently to put a number on the probability of alien life.
Infinity divided by 1000 is still infinity.


What about infinity *TIMES* infinity?

i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 10:05:41 AM  
1. Does it have a form of water?
2. Does it have some carbon and nitrogen as well?
3. Does it have a source of energy?

If the answer to all three is yes, it's habitable.

/Maybe not by humans, you bigots.
//But probably them, too.
///Likely thousands of habitable bodies in this solar system alone.
 
2020-11-25 11:48:19 AM  

luidprand: 1. Does it have a form of water?
2. Does it have some carbon and nitrogen as well?
3. Does it have a source of energy?

If the answer to all three is yes, it's habitable.

/Maybe not by humans, you bigots.
//But probably them, too.
///Likely thousands of habitable bodies in this solar system alone.


Water and basic protein components are dime a dozen, but the real difference maker, at least for life on earth, was phosphorus: it's a key component in the phospholipid bilayer, in ADP/ATP, and DNA. And it's relatively rare in the universe.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oPU9j​e​QbTOU
 
2020-11-25 1:01:33 PM  

2fardownthread: THE EXPANSE on Amazon Prime will blow your mind.

I do not think we are that far from finding life supporting conditions in many places throughout this solar system, let alone the galaxy. This is probably the order in terms of quality of life: Space Stations, Moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, Earth trojans, Mars trojans, Asteroids, Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, Jupiter Minor moons, Titan, Saturn minor moons, Venus, and even way out in the Kuiper Belt are some planetoids with a lot of what humans need. It all looks very harsh, but there are ways to manage it. You can see that the list above more or less conforms to "distance from Earth." That will not always be the case, but until Mars really gets going, humans will call Earth home.

Earth is a huge gravity hole. We need a base on the moon or at a Lagrange point to gather materials to move out farther into the solar system.

It is going to be tough to live on the surface of a lot of these places because of radiation at both ends of the spectrum, so humans will have to dig or shield themselves somehow. Gravity can be created by spinning an asteroid or space station. Given a decent amount of lead time, humans can create good habitats by digging into surfaces and then capping them off and getting atmospheres inside. Small nuclear power units can provide sufficient power for warmth. Solar can provide a lot of electricity.

If Musk wanted to take 50 billion and do a stretch program with volunteers, I think you could have a sustainable moon base in four years. Then he would have to fight it out with everyone else for squatters' rights. Or he could take 25 billion and capture his own asteroid and do whatever the hell he wants with it. I propose the establishment of an evil lair.

By the time humans move out beyond the solar system, I would bet that over 50 rocks and planets will have been colonized and mined, with more or less independent human settlements on 7 or 8 of them.


How do you create gravity by spinning an asteroid???
 
2020-11-25 1:03:57 PM  
Habitable for us?  For a planet to be habitable for anything more than pond scum-see earth from 3.8 to about 2 billion years ago-you need an oxygen atmosphere, which is maintained by living things.  As I enjoy sciencesplaining my creationist family, the first half of earth's history the environment would have killed you.  It was not made for you to thrive.  With no resupply of oxygen it all gets bound up in minerals.

The complexity of multicellular life came about when poisonous oxygen was harnessed to release hundreds of times the energy that bacteria could muster, removing the energetic constraints on complexity.
 
2020-11-25 1:13:15 PM  
We only know of carbon based life. There could be other forms of life in the universe that would thrive on Venus.
 
2020-11-25 1:54:41 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 2:00:42 PM  
So 1 possibly on track to be 0.


/we are our own worst enemy
 
2020-11-25 2:02:05 PM  

Alphax: Something near 1 G of gravity, and some air pressure would be a rather bare minimum.


So Venus is "inhabitable"?
 
2020-11-25 5:18:04 PM  

Alien Robot: Alphax: Something near 1 G of gravity, and some air pressure would be a rather bare minimum.

So Venus is "inhabitable"?


At certain altitudes, yes.
 
2020-11-25 5:21:25 PM  
The whole question is moot.  So to speak.

And any species that trashes their own planet and eventually destroys all other life has no business colonizing the galaxies anyway.
 
2020-11-25 6:13:29 PM  

RabidRythmDivas: 2fardownthread: THE EXPANSE on Amazon Prime will blow your mind.

I do not think we are that far from finding life supporting conditions in many places throughout this solar system, let alone the galaxy. This is probably the order in terms of quality of life: Space Stations, Moon, Mars, Phobos, Deimos, Earth trojans, Mars trojans, Asteroids, Callisto, Europa, Ganymede, Jupiter Minor moons, Titan, Saturn minor moons, Venus, and even way out in the Kuiper Belt are some planetoids with a lot of what humans need. It all looks very harsh, but there are ways to manage it. You can see that the list above more or less conforms to "distance from Earth." That will not always be the case, but until Mars really gets going, humans will call Earth home.

Earth is a huge gravity hole. We need a base on the moon or at a Lagrange point to gather materials to move out farther into the solar system.

It is going to be tough to live on the surface of a lot of these places because of radiation at both ends of the spectrum, so humans will have to dig or shield themselves somehow. Gravity can be created by spinning an asteroid or space station. Given a decent amount of lead time, humans can create good habitats by digging into surfaces and then capping them off and getting atmospheres inside. Small nuclear power units can provide sufficient power for warmth. Solar can provide a lot of electricity.

If Musk wanted to take 50 billion and do a stretch program with volunteers, I think you could have a sustainable moon base in four years. Then he would have to fight it out with everyone else for squatters' rights. Or he could take 25 billion and capture his own asteroid and do whatever the hell he wants with it. I propose the establishment of an evil lair.

By the time humans move out beyond the solar system, I would bet that over 50 rocks and planets will have been colonized and mined, with more or less independent human settlements on 7 or 8 of them.

How do you create gravity by spinning ...


I considered answering this in mime or interpretive dance, but I decided that the best way to explain is to show you.

Please google.

youtube.com: 2001 A Space Odyssey jogging scene

That pretty well clears it up.
 
2020-11-25 6:19:54 PM  

houginator: 2fardownthread: Venus has almost perfect gravity, but lead melts on the surface, and the atmosphere is acid. HOWEVER, if you could invent some acid proof balloons, you could float indefinitely above the heat and nastiness and have great temperatures AND some air pressure.

I'll never understand the appeal behind living in sky balloons on Venus.

- Any materials you want to use to construct your floating city have to be imported, either from space or the planet's surface (and its not clear which of those is the more difficult proposition).

- If the planet is ever actually terraformed, your floating cities will be a casualty of the process.

- Winds can exceed 200 mph, so you need to build things pretty robustly.

- Can't go outside, and If something goes wrong with your balloons, you are pretty farked.

Its all the disadvantages of living on a space station, combined with all the disadvantages of living inside a gravity well.


I get it. If you look on my master list, Venus is pretty far down the list despite its proximity to us. But Venus has a lot of volatiles among the inner planets. There might be a time when we need that. It could happen.

And if you are in the upper atmosphere, you are basically at the edge of the well dangling your feet in its cool waters.

Sigh. If you look at the huge distances we have confronting us, the inner planets are going to get some attention at some point simply because of their better logistic situation. There might even come an odd moral/environmental movement by which we limit our development to planets and environments that have no chance to sustain life as we know it, in which case asteroids and Venus and Mercury, having such extreme environments, will be attractive.
 
2020-11-26 10:59:07 AM  

Alphax: Something near 1 G of gravity, and some air pressure would be a rather bare minimum.


Isn't one G of gravity on every planet, relatively speaking?
 
2020-11-26 5:44:03 PM  

RabidRythmDivas: How do you create gravity by spinning an asteroid???


2fardownthread: I considered answering this in mime or interpretive dance, but I decided that the best way to explain is to show you.

Please google.

youtube.com: 2001 A Space Odyssey jogging scene

That pretty well clears it up.


So you're going to hollow out an asteroid and build a treadmill inside of it???
 
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