Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CNN)   If a hydrogen-powered train leaves Berlin for Hamburg at 150 km/hr, and at the same time a second train leaves Hamburg for Berlin on the same track, how big a boom will there be when they collide?   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Scary  
•       •       •

919 clicks; posted to STEM » on 25 Nov 2020 at 1:30 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-11-24 8:32:34 PM  
27 min 6 seconds.

But we had that question on a security exam in the 70s where I worked.
 
2020-11-24 8:32:47 PM  
I mean... as long as we don't let them get close to relativistic speeds, it shouldn't be too catastrophic...
 
2020-11-24 8:57:48 PM  
And then suddenly
 
2020-11-24 9:00:42 PM  
Big Bada Boom?
 
2020-11-25 1:51:11 AM  
Oh the Humanity!!!
 
2020-11-25 2:21:09 AM  
You know, Germany is a pretty rich country. I think they can afford separate tracks for trains heading in opposite directions.
 
2020-11-25 2:23:00 AM  
Obviously it is proof of concept stuff. I am pretty sure my house saves 3 tons of CO2 per year. Is that all? So one train would be like, 100 residential solar arrays. Does not seem like much. But this is a very interesting feat. Diesel is very efficient. Electric trains obviously already exist. The long run average cost of overhead electric lines is pretty trivial. You have to use your brain to understand what is really happening here.

The reason that the Germans are doing this is that they expect to have a very large hydrogen resource in a few years. Electricity is fundamentally synchronous... it has to be used when it is produced. But you can use electricity to produce hydrogen, store the hydrogen, and use it ASYNCHRONOUSLY. And you do not need to use a heavy bulky battery anywhere through the process, so you can use that capacity for passengers or cargo.

One of the cool things, and hideous curses, about solar and wind is that they will be intermittent and give you a lot of power over a long period of time, and quite frequently when you do not need it. It just gets wasted. Contractors and operators count on it. It is already waste. It is already free. Rather than turn Germany into one huge battery that loses its mojo little by little over about ten years, Germany is looking at making something or doing something with all that electricity that has more than zero value. A lot of "really stupid" people around the world think this is a great idea.

You know what you get if you replace 20% of the natural gas in a tank with hydrogen produced from curtailed solar and wind? You get gas with 20% fewer CO2 emissions when you burn it. Just like that.

I want to emphasize to critics that this ... will be unaffected by criticism. It is not going to be bought or sold by anyone, and this is strictly something that Germany is doing. Certainly the Germans and Japanese have no idea whatsoever what they are doing in the areas of science and they have nowhere near the intelligence or knowledge of people posting here on fark, so there is no reason to criticize them. Think of them as children. Poor misguided children who just don't know how great life could be if they just followed the advice of the brahmins of fark. Of course hydrogen has no hope of being useful, not in the shadow of THE POWERWALL, but let's just let them have their fun anyway. Let's humor them.

Except. Except. They were supergeniuses 10 years ago when they launched their energiewendte. They were the darlings of the left and greens worldwide. Hmm. So are they geniuses or aren't they? Did they change? Or did something else change?
 
2020-11-25 2:32:38 AM  

I Ate Shergar: You know, Germany is a pretty rich country. I think they can afford separate tracks for trains heading in opposite directions.


The railroad switch was patented by Charles Fox, an Englishman, in 1832. The Germans really should keep up.

In other news, there were actually rail lines in operation before there were switches. Can you imagine?
 
2020-11-25 2:58:31 AM  
Could be worse, they could be running a steam train.

i.pinimg.comView Full Size


1.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size


1.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 3:11:59 AM  
thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 4:35:09 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 5:00:36 AM  
Didn't we learn, like, 83 years ago not to power things with hydrogen?
 
2020-11-25 6:30:54 AM  
This will become mankind's next mode of wheeled transport.

external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 6:33:24 AM  
This is being done cleverly, even though the real impact on CO2 generation will nit be significant now.

The same train engines can be adapted to use electric cables for power later, presumably.
 
2020-11-25 6:41:51 AM  
I can't wait until we have Mr. Fusion powered trains.
 
2020-11-25 7:00:11 AM  

Animatronik: This is being done cleverly, even though the real impact on CO2 generation will nit be significant now.

The same train engines can be adapted to use electric cables for power later, presumably.


or not. This kind of train might be good for seismic areas. The Japanese have laid the cable and built the track, but for a lot of other countries that want rail, this is a way to do it.

The Germans might also be testing different sized power plants. The article mentions two. So maybe they have some different configurations in mind for use throughout Europe and Asia. Obviously, these can even go where there is no grid. Such as.... on the moon someday?
 
2020-11-25 7:01:16 AM  

Ishkur: Didn't we learn, like, 83 years ago not to power things with hydrogen?


Hey. Even this is too much FUD so close to Thanksgiving!
 
2020-11-25 8:27:57 AM  

dryknife: This will become mankind's next mode of wheeled transport.

[external-content.duckduckgo.com image 264x300]


How many clams will it cost?
 
2020-11-25 8:45:56 AM  
No German technology that relies on hydrogen can be all bad.
 
2020-11-25 8:47:59 AM  
Atoms are mostly empty space, they'll just pass right through each other
 
2020-11-25 8:56:25 AM  
330 tons CO2 saved per year per unit? That seems silly billy. Depending on their distribution chain, that's only 50 to 75 gallons of diesel a day. Considering a train will use 4-7 gallons per mile, that's a pathetic savings. They could get the same environmental benefits by replacing a couple of diesel semi trucks with RNG and probably save a ton of money. I wonder which oil company is pressuring the gov't into doing this.

Hydrogen is the dumbest "clean fuel" there is. There are only a small handful of applications where it makes sense. Planes, rockets, or anything else where weight is a major concern and the price of fuel is already very high.

I guess if they just can't run power lines in those areas, then maybe. But that seems like a huge cost for the tiny benefit they'll receive. We need to go after the low hanging fruit of AGW. Power generation and road vehicles.
 
2020-11-25 10:22:33 AM  
Hydrogen makes a little more sense in this application than it does for cars or trucks. Weight and volume aren't too critical, consumption is known, only a few fueling depots are needed.
 
2020-11-25 3:20:07 PM  
The trains will put themselves out.
 
Displayed 23 of 23 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.