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(Some Guy)   Sometimes you want green bean casserole with fresh ingredients, but sometimes you want it the way your Grammaw used to make it: Way too much salt, mushy canned beans, greasy French-fried onions and all. I don't judge   (food.livedogproductions.com) divider line
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386 clicks; posted to Food » on 24 Nov 2020 at 5:20 PM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-11-24 5:22:50 PM  
My recipe uses frozen french-cut green beans, condensed mushroom soup, dried onion flakes, half and half for liquid, Trader Joe's 21 season salute, some nutmeg, and of course french-fried onions that get applied during the last 10 minutes of baking.

I usually make it sans fried onions the day before to allow the flavors to mature, then heat it up and apply the onions just before the roast beast hits the table.

And now I'm getting hungry.
 
2020-11-24 5:25:09 PM  
This is a side dish I have never made and never will.  Three-bean salad on the other hand, I make and like.
 
2020-11-24 5:32:21 PM  

natazha: This is a side dish I have never made and never will.  Three-bean salad on the other hand, I make and like.


It was never part of my family's traditions, so the first time I ate it was well after I moved out. Sometime after college, I think. I was excited to try it because I'd heard of it from many people who consider it a classic American holiday dish. It pretty much just as Subby described in the headline. I won't eat it again, there are just so many better options.
 
2020-11-24 5:40:51 PM  
We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

Fark user imageView Full Size


That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).
 
2020-11-24 5:51:12 PM  
Almost verbatim the same recipe I found on the McCormick's site.  Grammaw sure got around.

"Theirs goes 'ding-ding-ding-diggy-ding-ding'.  Ours goes 'ding-ding-ding-diggy-ding-ding-tss'  It's totally different."
 
2020-11-24 5:56:56 PM  
My aunt (mom's sister in law) made an awesome recipe, that did not involve cream of mushroom soup or canned fried onions.

Drain 48 oz. Green beans (exact type doesn't matter)
1 lb. Bacon
1 large onion, any type (the recipe called for purple, but sweet onions work, too).
1 cup cider vinegar
1 cup sugar

Preheat oven to 400° F
Cook 1 lb. bacon and set aside; conserve the grease
Put the drained green beans in a casserole dish
Cut up the onion, chop coarsely, scatter on top of the beans
Warm up the vinegar
Mix the sugar and conserved bacon grease into the vinegar
Pour the mixture over the beans and onions
Crumble the bacon and scatter over the casserole
Bake for 2 hours.

Alternative for less fat:
Use chicken or vegetable broth in place of the bacon grease and use precooked bacon. This version also works in a crock pot.
 
2020-11-24 6:00:04 PM  

InfoFreako: Almost verbatim the same recipe I found on the McCormick's site.  Grammaw sure got around.

"Theirs goes 'ding-ding-ding-diggy-ding-ding'.  Ours goes 'ding-ding-ding-diggy-ding-ding-tss'  It's totally different."


Many grandmothers' secret recipes are just advertisements masquerading as "recipes" from grocery supply conglomerates. Some of them are good and some are bad. Green bean casserole is decent. It's not the best thing in the world, it just tastes like a mixture of over salted canned goods because that's all it is. It's extremely easy to make out of cheap, easily procured ingredients which is your grandmother made it. The same reason your mom made you Koolaid back in the 80s.
 
2020-11-24 6:02:11 PM  
 
2020-11-24 6:03:54 PM  
The only time I've ever found this unholy gastronomic abortion even remotely palatable was when it was scratch made. Even then it reeked of lonely midwestern housewife from the 50s who doesn't own a dildo and needs to get her lithium habit under control.

/I keed. It wasn't that bad
//the only traditional tday "dish" that is banned from my home
 
2020-11-24 6:07:19 PM  
Wtf is grammaw?
 
2020-11-24 6:16:08 PM  
It took me a long time to like Green Beans, love em now but only fresh. Never could get the hang of canned.
 
2020-11-24 6:19:18 PM  
Fresh green beans, steamed until barely cooked.  Drain, transfer to pan with sliced almonds toasting in butter.  Keep your mush beans.
 
2020-11-24 6:20:34 PM  
Soy sauce? That's new.
 
2020-11-24 6:21:16 PM  

markie_farkie: My recipe uses frozen french-cut green beans, condensed mushroom soup, dried onion flakes, half and half for liquid, Trader Joe's 21 season salute, some nutmeg, and of course french-fried onions that get applied during the last 10 minutes of baking.

I usually make it sans fried onions the day before to allow the flavors to mature, then heat it up and apply the onions just before the roast beast hits the table.

And now I'm getting hungry.


I have a similar recipe. It's like the difference between homemade macaroni and cheese and Krapft Mac & Cheese.

https://food.livedogproductions.com/s​u​perior-green-bean-casserole/
 
2020-11-24 6:23:02 PM  

UberDave: We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

[Fark user image 850x413]

That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).


Is that a mushroom?
 
2020-11-24 6:24:36 PM  
I hate it either way, but in fairness it seems to be a dish like a grilled cheese sandwich. There's one flavor that chimes in your memory. There's no possible way to improve it when what you want is that one flavor.
 
2020-11-24 6:25:33 PM  
sometimes you want the green bean casserole sotimes the green bean casserole wants you

/let the record show I personally however have never wanted a green bean casserole the entire accusation is preposterous
 
2020-11-24 6:26:18 PM  
i REALLY enjoy eating this once every year or two. it's just not something that is in line with our usual cooking habits.

but what's up with specifying campbell's soup and french's onions? they used wallmarks brand green beans. might as well cheap out on all the ingredients--it's not like you could tell in the finished product.
 
2020-11-24 6:31:33 PM  

InfoFreako: Almost verbatim the same recipe I found on the McCormick's site.  Grammaw sure got around.

"Theirs goes 'ding-ding-ding-diggy-ding-ding'.  Ours goes 'ding-ding-ding-diggy-ding-ding-tss'  It's totally different."


When Dubya was in office, his wife shared her chocolate chip cookie recipe with Ladies Home Journal or some other similar mag.

Somebody posted it on Fark, saying it was just like some other recipe in a cookbook and she plagiarized it. Just how much difference is there between cookie dough recipes? Flour, butter, sugar, baking soda, egg. You can use salted or unsalted butter, butter-flavored Crisco, play around with nutmeg or vanilla. It's not like someone's gonna break new ground here.

Kind of like saying Wild Thing, Guantanamera, La Bamba, Twist And Shout, Hang On Sloopy, Get Off Of My Cloud, and You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling were all ripped off from Louie Louie.
 
2020-11-24 6:38:42 PM  

palelizard: Soy sauce? That's new.


Nah, the Chinese have been using it for centuries.
 
2020-11-24 6:40:37 PM  
We never had that in our family.  But the baked creamed corn dish is legendary.
 
2020-11-24 7:22:47 PM  

born_yesterday: palelizard: Soy sauce? That's new.

Nah, the Chinese have been using it for centuries.


But that's not important right now.
 
2020-11-24 8:08:31 PM  

Sensei Can You See: UberDave: We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

[Fark user image 850x413]

That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).

Is that a mushroom?


Heh.  I didn't even notice!

I usually pour off my bacon grease in those red dixie cups or similar.  After that, I put them in the fridge until the grease is pretty solid then scissor off the excess cup and toss it in the freezer.  When I need one, ten minutes on the counter and it plops right out.  The little particles you see are the little pieces of bacon that were in the grease.

So now you're going, "holy cow that's a lot of bacon grease!"  Yes it is baby.  That was last Thanksgiving.  I have about 7lbs of green beans ready to go for this Thursday.
 
2020-11-24 8:08:50 PM  
I made an interesting accidental discovery one year. I feast shopped on Wednesday only to find on Thanksgiving I had forgotten fried onions and the grocery was closed. So I ended up getting Funyuns from 7-11. They are lower in fat, cheaper and worked quite well.
 
2020-11-24 8:12:30 PM  
Husband makes it from scratch.  Cooks illustrated recipe i think.  I love it.

Greg up with the canned beans/cream of mushroom soup version.  Bleh.
 
2020-11-24 8:31:02 PM  

UberDave: We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

[Fark user image 850x413]

That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).


uhm, those look like AMAZING base ingredients for long-cooked collards or something, but do you really mean "green beans"?

these guys?

Fark user imageView Full Size


WHY ON EARTH would you do that to them? turn them as mushy and gross camo green as the canned ones?

fresh green beans should be enjoyed crisp-tender, rendered that way by a blanch, or steam, or even brief microwave zap, then dressed with something like red wine vinegar and fresh minced garlic, or fresh lemon and butter, or herbed vinaigrette, or something.....

please tell me you secretly  are putting some kind of DRIED bean, or pigeon pea, or "greens" or some such, into that pot of awesomeness!

-canned green beans (or green peas) are not fit for human consumption- i don't even think my aquarium snails would eat them.
 
2020-11-24 8:44:07 PM  
My grandmother uses cream of cheddar in hers instead of cream of mushroom. She is 85 and says that before cream of mushroom came out the original recipe used cheddar. I have never found if that was true. But it's still great every year. It's the only thing she can still easily cook (my dad roast is prime rib).
 
2020-11-24 8:57:27 PM  
YEAH.  F*ck a bunch of that.

This is way more like real food.

Classic Green Beans Au Gratin - Food Wishes
Youtube vIuxF39HPHI
 
2020-11-24 10:04:39 PM  

UberDave: Sensei Can You See: UberDave: We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

[Fark user image 850x413]

That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).

Is that a mushroom?

Heh.  I didn't even notice!

I usually pour off my bacon grease in those red dixie cups or similar.  After that, I put them in the fridge until the grease is pretty solid then scissor off the excess cup and toss it in the freezer.  When I need one, ten minutes on the counter and it plops right out.  The little particles you see are the little pieces of bacon that were in the grease.

So now you're going, "holy cow that's a lot of bacon grease!"  Yes it is baby.  That was last Thanksgiving.  I have about 7lbs of green beans ready to go for this Thursday.


So that's the rim of the cup poking out?

Interesting. I have a couple airtight containers I keep in the back of the fridge. When I need some for gravy or other cooking I use some of it from one container; when I have two pounds in the other one I use it to make soap.

EVerything's better with bacon. Even soap.
 
2020-11-24 10:13:09 PM  

luna1580: UberDave: We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

[Fark user image 850x413]

That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).

uhm, those look like AMAZING base ingredients for long-cooked collards or something, but do you really mean "green beans"?

these guys?

[Fark user image 396x373]

WHY ON EARTH would you do that to them? turn them as mushy and gross camo green as the canned ones?

fresh green beans should be enjoyed crisp-tender, rendered that way by a blanch, or steam, or even brief microwave zap, then dressed with something like red wine vinegar and fresh minced garlic, or fresh lemon and butter, or herbed vinaigrette, or something.....

please tell me you secretly  are putting some kind of DRIED bean, or pigeon pea, or "greens" or some such, into that pot of awesomeness!


I do similar with various dried beans for sure.  But nope, that is for green beans.  I don't know if it is a Southern or just a Texas thing - one of the most popular dishes in Texas is chicken fried steak, mashed potatoes and green beans that are just like this.  Long cooked and snapped green beans are also popular as a side with cajun food.  And there is orders of magnitude difference between those and canned green beans.  There are varying long simmer bean recipes all over the state and many people I know, at least my age, have memories of snapping beans with their grandparents for making this pot.

And I enjoy green beans every way you describe - this is merely one way that, apparently, you've never had.  I probably steam them more that I do what is shown.  Second is an olive oil saute in the grill basket with mushrooms with a rare few ounces of salmon on top.
 
2020-11-24 10:26:28 PM  

UberDave: luna1580: UberDave: We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

[Fark user image 850x413]

That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).

uhm, those look like AMAZING base ingredients for long-cooked collards or something, but do you really mean "green beans"?

these guys?

[Fark user image 396x373]

WHY ON EARTH would you do that to them? turn them as mushy and gross camo green as the canned ones?

fresh green beans should be enjoyed crisp-tender, rendered that way by a blanch, or steam, or even brief microwave zap, then dressed with something like red wine vinegar and fresh minced garlic, or fresh lemon and butter, or herbed vinaigrette, or something.....

please tell me you secretly  are putting some kind of DRIED bean, or pigeon pea, or "greens" or some such, into that pot of awesomeness!

I do similar with various dried beans for sure.  But nope, that is for green beans.  I don't know if it is a Southern or just a Texas thing - one of the most popular dishes in Texas is chicken fried steak, mashed potatoes and green beans that are just like this.  Long cooked and snapped green beans are also popular as a side with cajun food.  And there is orders of magnitude difference between those and canned green beans.  There are varying long simmer bean recipes all over the state and many people I know, at least my age, have memories of snapping beans with their grandparents for making this pot.

And I enjoy green beans every way you describe - this is merely one way that, apparently, you've never had.  I probably steam them more that I do what is shown.  Second is an olive oil saute in the grill basket with mushrooms with a rare few ounces of salmon on top.


huh, i believe you it's WAY better than canned. and i believe you it's a southern/texas/cajun/soul food thing.

i've SEEN green beans -that must have been prepared your way- as a side in those contexts (not texas, never been to texas yet) but was afraid to even try them because of the color.

that dull camo color made me think of canned/over-cooked-in-some-casserole green beans (which i HATE) and made me cowardly of new things.
 
2020-11-24 11:00:43 PM  

ProcrastinationStation: Husband makes it from scratch.  Cooks illustrated recipe i think.  I love it.

Greg up with the canned beans/cream of mushroom soup version.  Bleh.


I just finished making the mushroom sauce for the CI recipe. I'll make the rest Thursday. Even Cooks Illustrated says that you can't beat the convenience of the canned fried onions, though they add buttered bread crumbs to them. I use the Fresh Gourmet fried onions that Costco carries. They're less greasy than the canned version.
 
2020-11-24 11:31:18 PM  

luna1580: UberDave: (snip) I do similar with various dried beans for sure.  But nope, that is for green beans.  I don't know if it is a Southern or just a Texas thing - one of the most popular dishes in Texas is chicken fried steak, mashed potatoes and green beans that are just like this.  Long cooked and snapped green beans are also popular as a side with cajun food.  And there is orders of magnitude difference between those and canned green beans.  There are varying long simmer bean recipes all over the state and many people I know, at least my age, have memories of snapping beans with their grandparents for making this pot.

And I enjoy green beans every way you describe - this is merely one way that, apparently, you've never had.  I probably steam them more that I do what is shown.  Second is an olive oil saute in the grill basket with mushrooms with a rare few ounces of salmon on top.

huh, i believe you it's WAY better than canned. and i believe you it's a southern/texas/cajun/soul food thing.

i've SEEN green beans -that must have been prepared your way- as a side in those contexts (not texas, never been to texas yet) but was afraid to even try them because of the color.

that dull camo color made me think of canned/over-cooked-in-some-casserole green beans (which i HATE) and made me cowardly of new things.



Typically, when you see them at a good local place (and yes, definitely a soul food place), they have their own recipe and the beans are full of flavor.  But some places *do* indeed take canned and spice them up - any Texan or person from Louisiana (and other places in the south) would recognize the can stuff instantly.

I think it does have its roots in soul food or similar.  My family (both sides), my wife's family (both sides) all have poor, rural ancestry as do most people I grew up with.

And I forgot to add, yes, collard greens are done in a similar manner to what I show, for sure.  I think my grandmother used to use a ham bone if she had one (of course, that goes in everything)...otherwise it was chopped up, uncooked bacon.
 
2020-11-24 11:41:10 PM  
For us this year the plan is turnip greens and spinach wilted down in garlic, onions, bacon, the juice of a couple lemons and some white wine. Maybe a couple pinches of red pepper flakes.

Mashed potatoes for sure, with shallots and cheddar.

Probably some pearl onions in butter because I am nostalgic for them.

We can't do a bird ourselves this year because we are living in a motel room so the plan is to order some turkey from Boston Market and just do the sides ourselves. I am okay with that because historically their birds have been tasty when I have dined there. I hope it holds out.
 
2020-11-24 11:52:22 PM  

ToughActinProlactin: For us this year the plan is turnip greens and spinach wilted down in garlic, onions, bacon, the juice of a couple lemons and some white wine. Maybe a couple pinches of red pepper flakes.

Mashed potatoes for sure, with shallots and cheddar.

Probably some pearl onions in butter because I am nostalgic for them.

We can't do a bird ourselves this year because we are living in a motel room so the plan is to order some turkey from Boston Market and just do the sides ourselves. I am okay with that because historically their birds have been tasty when I have dined there. I hope it holds out.


Boston Market sides don't suck.
 
2020-11-24 11:58:28 PM  

rosekolodny: ToughActinProlactin: For us this year the plan is turnip greens and spinach wilted down in garlic, onions, bacon, the juice of a couple lemons and some white wine. Maybe a couple pinches of red pepper flakes.

Mashed potatoes for sure, with shallots and cheddar.

Probably some pearl onions in butter because I am nostalgic for them.

We can't do a bird ourselves this year because we are living in a motel room so the plan is to order some turkey from Boston Market and just do the sides ourselves. I am okay with that because historically their birds have been tasty when I have dined there. I hope it holds out.

Boston Market sides don't suck.


We have a couple of hot plates we bought to handle stovetop cooking so I wanna do at least some of the ritual of crafting sides because I love cooking when possible.

I remember their sides being passable. But really I just need some turkey this year.
 
2020-11-25 12:03:23 AM  

ToughActinProlactin: rosekolodny: ToughActinProlactin: For us this year the plan is turnip greens and spinach wilted down in garlic, onions, bacon, the juice of a couple lemons and some white wine. Maybe a couple pinches of red pepper flakes.

Mashed potatoes for sure, with shallots and cheddar.

Probably some pearl onions in butter because I am nostalgic for them.

We can't do a bird ourselves this year because we are living in a motel room so the plan is to order some turkey from Boston Market and just do the sides ourselves. I am okay with that because historically their birds have been tasty when I have dined there. I hope it holds out.

Boston Market sides don't suck.

We have a couple of hot plates we bought to handle stovetop cooking so I wanna do at least some of the ritual of crafting sides because I love cooking when possible.

I remember their sides being passable. But really I just need some turkey this year.


Greens sound good, and so do mashed taters if you have enough pans.  Or brussels sprouts with bacon?
 
2020-11-25 1:45:54 AM  

UberDave: We're doing spinach and broccoli.  I *am*, however doing a big pot of regular green beans.  It usually starts like this:

[Fark user image 850x413]

That's European butter, bacon grease, ham pieces, brisket fat, onion and shallots.  I use a bunch of chicken stock and a little water and cook them for hours (once they go in).


speaking as a vegetarian...? WANT!!! oh dear lord is that gorgeous.

last year, to my eternal shame but also personal-amusement, I made green bean casserole dip. you basicamente take all the unholiness of the standart grammaw version, then mix in a ridiculous amount of cream cheese, form babby into a ball and refrigerate. cover liberally with tinned fried onyon and serve.

I had exactly one bite, which was more than enough to satisfy my childhood-self. my in-laws inhaled the rest of it, though. I got more than a few requests for the "recipe." me: buh? there was a recipe involved?
 
2020-11-25 1:54:01 AM  

ToughActinProlactin: We have a couple of hot plates we bought to handle stovetop cooking so I wanna do at least some of the ritual of crafting sides because I love cooking when possible.


now there is some true childhood holiday nostalgia, a dozen hotplates suddenly materializing with arriving guests. the tempered-glass ones. this is irrevocably coded into my feelings about holidays.

Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-25 9:31:21 AM  

kp1230: ProcrastinationStation: Husband makes it from scratch.  Cooks illustrated recipe i think.  I love it.

Greg up with the canned beans/cream of mushroom soup version.  Bleh.

I just finished making the mushroom sauce for the CI recipe. I'll make the rest Thursday. Even Cooks Illustrated says that you can't beat the convenience of the canned fried onions, though they add buttered bread crumbs to them. I use the Fresh Gourmet fried onions that Costco carries. They're less greasy than the canned version.


Mushroom "sauce" is on the list today.

Just the two of us but I insisted husband make the casserole anyway.

And for those who think the beans are mushy?  This recipe blanches fresh beans and all you do is heat them in the oven when you create the casserole.  They're still nice and firm.
 
2020-11-25 9:33:05 AM  

ToughActinProlactin: For us this year the plan is turnip greens and spinach wilted down in garlic, onions, bacon, the juice of a couple lemons and some white wine. Maybe a couple pinches of red pepper flakes.

Mashed potatoes for sure, with shallots and cheddar.

Probably some pearl onions in butter because I am nostalgic for them.

We can't do a bird ourselves this year because we are living in a motel room so the plan is to order some turkey from Boston Market and just do the sides ourselves. I am okay with that because historically their birds have been tasty when I have dined there. I hope it holds out.


Oh god I feel for you.  We spent a month in an extended stay America.  That at least had a tiny "kitchen" area so we were able to "cook".

Hopefully you're out of hotel soon....
 
2020-11-25 11:03:17 AM  
If all you've ever had was green bean casserole made with canned beans and condensed soup, then of course you don't like it.

Make the mushroom gravy from a mix of mushrooms, a real roux, and fresh heavy cream. Combine with blanched fresh green beans and maybe some parm. Bake then top with fresh fried shallots dusted in flour. My friends, you've got something tasty.
 
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