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(The Verge)   It's the WeWork of gaming, but with blackjack and hookers   (theverge.com) divider line
    More: Wheaton  
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1132 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 24 Nov 2020 at 3:55 PM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-11-24 3:15:03 PM  
tl;dr -- Wheaton mentioned twice, has nothing to do with the story.
 
2020-11-24 3:19:19 PM  
that website hurt my eyes.
 
2020-11-24 3:20:04 PM  
Dbag acts like a dbag, cute chick takes advantage of him. Yawn.
 
2020-11-24 4:28:37 PM  
I skimmed a little in the middle of the article so consider (and forgive) that - but what the hell did they spend so much time trying to develop?  Was it table top game tournament game management software or was it more?

When they describe the Catan tourney and say the software couldn't handle it, what are they talking about.  I think the article is simply lacking details (unless I missed it).

Don't get me wrong, I can see how you can get together a bunch of early 20s "go-getters" and they totally fark up and bog development on the simplest of things - yet think they are super-genius awesome.  I'm just wondering if that is *one* of the things that happened here.
 
2020-11-24 4:34:16 PM  

UberDave: I skimmed a little in the middle of the article so consider (and forgive) that - but what the hell did they spend so much time trying to develop?  Was it table top game tournament game management software or was it more?

When they describe the Catan tourney and say the software couldn't handle it, what are they talking about.  I think the article is simply lacking details (unless I missed it).

Don't get me wrong, I can see how you can get together a bunch of early 20s "go-getters" and they totally fark up and bog development on the simplest of things - yet think they are super-genius awesome.  I'm just wondering if that is *one* of the things that happened here.


tl;dr: ostensibly, they were going to create tournament management software.  What they were really creating was a way to convert venture capital into steak and blowjobs.
 
2020-11-24 4:57:54 PM  

FrancoFile: UberDave: I skimmed a little in the middle of the article so consider (and forgive) that - but what the hell did they spend so much time trying to develop?  Was it table top game tournament game management software or was it more?

When they describe the Catan tourney and say the software couldn't handle it, what are they talking about.  I think the article is simply lacking details (unless I missed it).

Don't get me wrong, I can see how you can get together a bunch of early 20s "go-getters" and they totally fark up and bog development on the simplest of things - yet think they are super-genius awesome.  I'm just wondering if that is *one* of the things that happened here.

tl;dr: ostensibly, they were going to create tournament management software.  What they were really creating was a way to convert venture capital into steak and blowjobs.


That's what I was thinking.  But for several years and millions of dollars (where you weren't paying your devs shiat), I would think that the software better cook steak and give blowjobs.  Seriously, what the fark were the requirements? It's managing table top game tournaments....
 
2020-11-24 4:58:10 PM  

FrancoFile: What they were really creating was a way to convert venture capital into steak and blowjobs.


The Nicolas Flamel of start ups!
 
2020-11-24 5:00:09 PM  

UberDave: FrancoFile: UberDave: I skimmed a little in the middle of the article so consider (and forgive) that - but what the hell did they spend so much time trying to develop?  Was it table top game tournament game management software or was it more?

When they describe the Catan tourney and say the software couldn't handle it, what are they talking about.  I think the article is simply lacking details (unless I missed it).

Don't get me wrong, I can see how you can get together a bunch of early 20s "go-getters" and they totally fark up and bog development on the simplest of things - yet think they are super-genius awesome.  I'm just wondering if that is *one* of the things that happened here.

tl;dr: ostensibly, they were going to create tournament management software.  What they were really creating was a way to convert venture capital into steak and blowjobs.

That's what I was thinking.  But for several years and millions of dollars (where you weren't paying your devs shiat), I would think that the software better cook steak and give blowjobs.  Seriously, what the fark were the requirements? It's managing table top game tournaments....



They hired random college kids from UC Irvine as devs.  There were no requirements, other than "make this thing in Vegas next week look good!"  It was started by a serial entrepreneur who just wanted to go to strip clubs and pull peoples' strings.
 
2020-11-24 5:10:21 PM  

FrancoFile: UberDave: FrancoFile: UberDave: I skimmed a little in the middle of the article so consider (and forgive) that - but what the hell did they spend so much time trying to develop?  Was it table top game tournament game management software or was it more?

When they describe the Catan tourney and say the software couldn't handle it, what are they talking about.  I think the article is simply lacking details (unless I missed it).

Don't get me wrong, I can see how you can get together a bunch of early 20s "go-getters" and they totally fark up and bog development on the simplest of things - yet think they are super-genius awesome.  I'm just wondering if that is *one* of the things that happened here.

tl;dr: ostensibly, they were going to create tournament management software.  What they were really creating was a way to convert venture capital into steak and blowjobs.

That's what I was thinking.  But for several years and millions of dollars (where you weren't paying your devs shiat), I would think that the software better cook steak and give blowjobs.  Seriously, what the fark were the requirements? It's managing table top game tournaments....


They hired random college kids from UC Irvine as devs.  There were no requirements, other than "make this thing in Vegas next week look good!"  It was started by a serial entrepreneur who just wanted to go to strip clubs and pull peoples' strings.


He was, apparently, good at that.  I think this is one of those instances where the headline is really accurate.  I see one of the devs was saying that he was owed $160K of back pay.  For what?!  Going to work and producing almost *nothing*.  I think the devs working "nights and weekends" got me.  I did that not long out of college and the software I produced doing such, by myself, is still in use almost 20 years later.
 
2020-11-24 5:11:28 PM  
I'm just amazed Gameworks has fallen so far that this...um...thing managed to buy it.
 
2020-11-24 7:47:43 PM  
UberDave: Seriously, what the fark were the requirements? It's managing table top game tournaments....

Well if they were trying to write software for The Campaign For North Africa I might buy it.
 
2020-11-24 8:55:34 PM  
Made it about halfway through that rambling mess of an article.

Was the writer trying to go for a Rolling Stone long form style?
 
2020-11-24 10:40:41 PM  

Discordulator: Made it about halfway through that rambling mess of an article.

Was the writer trying to go for a Rolling Stone long form style?


I was kind of thinking the young lady who was flirty and fun decided to encourage the CEO to create a claim worthy case was the author?

Am I right?
 
2020-11-24 11:52:05 PM  

UberDave: I skimmed a little in the middle of the article so consider (and forgive) that - but what the hell did they spend so much time trying to develop?  Was it table top game tournament game management software or was it more?

When they describe the Catan tourney and say the software couldn't handle it, what are they talking about.  I think the article is simply lacking details (unless I missed it).

Don't get me wrong, I can see how you can get together a bunch of early 20s "go-getters" and they totally fark up and bog development on the simplest of things - yet think they are super-genius awesome.  I'm just wondering if that is *one* of the things that happened here.


I used to volunteer with Mayfair Games at the major conventions and know how much data is kept in those tourneys, how it was processed to match up the proceeding matches, etc. You have to try and keep track of scores as well as win/loss ratio. You have to maintain all of that round's data to seat the next round and rotate both ends of the bracket (double elimination) and place tables so that all players play the same people as few times as possible. It is a LOT of work and a system Mayfair developed over years.

I remember their running of it in 2014. It was a shiat show. They had no clue. I think they just saw the big Catan tournament as a way to put their name on something. "HI! MY NAME IS OOMBA!" They weren't there to run the tournament. They were there to put their name on every wall and show presence so that investors would see they were doing something with their money and give them more.

Now, the Wheaton tournaments... Very few of those games are games you can run an actual tournament on. Munchkin is an exercise in randomness mixed with screw your neighbor episodes. It's a game that can run 40 minutes as it can run 2 hours, depending on the players and how bad they pay attention to what's going on around them. I looked at it, saw the selection of games and said "Nope. This is stupid."

And it was.
 
2020-11-25 12:05:13 AM  

NathanAllen: Discordulator: Made it about halfway through that rambling mess of an article.

Was the writer trying to go for a Rolling Stone long form style?

I was kind of thinking the young lady who was flirty and fun decided to encourage the CEO to create a claim worthy case was the author?

Am I right?


The author said the names were changed to protect her identity. (asterisk next to the name, and scrolled waaaaaaay down to the bottom for that note)

Couldn't say if the author is the lady.
 
2020-11-25 9:39:54 AM  
And yet somehow WeWork is still cranking out offices.
 
2020-11-25 12:21:46 PM  

FunkyBlue: UberDave: (snip) I used to volunteer with Mayfair Games at the major conventions and know how much data is kept in those tourneys, how it was processed to match up the proceeding matches, etc. You have to try and keep track of scores as well as win/loss ratio. You have to maintain all of that round's data to seat the next round and rotate both ends of the bracket (double elimination) and place tables so that all players play the same people as few times as possible. It is a LOT of work and a system Mayfair developed over years.

I remember their running of it in 2014. It was a shiat show. They had no clue. I think they just saw the big Catan tournament as a way to put their name on something. "HI! MY NAME IS OOMBA!" They weren't there to run the tournament. They were there to put their name on every wall and show presence so that investors would see they were doing something with their money and give them more.

Now, the Wheaton tournaments... Very few of those games are games you can run an actual tournament on. Munchkin is an exercise in randomness mixed with screw your neighbor episodes. It's a game that can run 40 minutes as it can run 2 hours, depending on the players and how bad they pay attention to what's going on around them. I looked at it, saw the selection of games and said "Nope. This is stupid."

And it was.


Good post.

Most of my gaming tournament knowledge comes from MTG and Pokemon TCG tournaments.  I know how easy those can be to fark up.  Everyone I've seen run was done on paper or in excel.  I haven't done MTG in years with the exception of an event a few years back where I wanted to show my son - the local gaming shop was doing an event.  I *think* they were using a specialized MTG tournament software.

But what you describe in the first paragraph is what I thought.  My job for the last 20 years has been developing data handling/input/tracking software from nothing to live.  And often based on requirements I have to derive myself (i.e. the end user doesn't understand what needs to happen)  The data is intricate as all hell.  Writing a piece of software to handle the data you describe doesn't sound like anything difficult...to me.
 
2020-11-25 4:04:26 PM  

UberDave: FunkyBlue: UberDave: (snip) I used to volunteer with Mayfair Games at the major conventions and know how much data is kept in those tourneys, how it was processed to match up the proceeding matches, etc. You have to try and keep track of scores as well as win/loss ratio. You have to maintain all of that round's data to seat the next round and rotate both ends of the bracket (double elimination) and place tables so that all players play the same people as few times as possible. It is a LOT of work and a system Mayfair developed over years.

I remember their running of it in 2014. It was a shiat show. They had no clue. I think they just saw the big Catan tournament as a way to put their name on something. "HI! MY NAME IS OOMBA!" They weren't there to run the tournament. They were there to put their name on every wall and show presence so that investors would see they were doing something with their money and give them more.

Now, the Wheaton tournaments... Very few of those games are games you can run an actual tournament on. Munchkin is an exercise in randomness mixed with screw your neighbor episodes. It's a game that can run 40 minutes as it can run 2 hours, depending on the players and how bad they pay attention to what's going on around them. I looked at it, saw the selection of games and said "Nope. This is stupid."

And it was.

Good post.

Most of my gaming tournament knowledge comes from MTG and Pokemon TCG tournaments.  I know how easy those can be to fark up.  Everyone I've seen run was done on paper or in excel.  I haven't done MTG in years with the exception of an event a few years back where I wanted to show my son - the local gaming shop was doing an event.  I *think* they were using a specialized MTG tournament software.

But what you describe in the first paragraph is what I thought.  My job for the last 20 years has been developing data handling/input/tracking software from nothing to live.  And often based on requirements I have to derive myself (i.e. the end user doesn't understand what needs to happen)  The data is intricate as all hell.  Writing a piece of software to handle the data you describe doesn't sound like anything difficult...to me.


The big draw of this project was to make the tourney management plug-and-play with any and all gaming systems, particularly for esports, as opposed to making a different specialized program for any given game.
 
2020-11-26 5:33:30 AM  

UberDave: FrancoFile: UberDave: FrancoFile: UberDave: I skimmed a little in the middle of the article so consider (and forgive) that - but what the hell did they spend so much time trying to develop?  Was it table top game tournament game management software or was it more?

When they describe the Catan tourney and say the software couldn't handle it, what are they talking about.  I think the article is simply lacking details (unless I missed it).

Don't get me wrong, I can see how you can get together a bunch of early 20s "go-getters" and they totally fark up and bog development on the simplest of things - yet think they are super-genius awesome.  I'm just wondering if that is *one* of the things that happened here.

tl;dr: ostensibly, they were going to create tournament management software.  What they were really creating was a way to convert venture capital into steak and blowjobs.

That's what I was thinking.  But for several years and millions of dollars (where you weren't paying your devs shiat), I would think that the software better cook steak and give blowjobs.  Seriously, what the fark were the requirements? It's managing table top game tournaments....


They hired random college kids from UC Irvine as devs.  There were no requirements, other than "make this thing in Vegas next week look good!"  It was started by a serial entrepreneur who just wanted to go to strip clubs and pull peoples' strings.

He was, apparently, good at that.  I think this is one of those instances where the headline is really accurate.  I see one of the devs was saying that he was owed $160K of back pay.  For what?!  Going to work and producing almost *nothing*.  I think the devs working "nights and weekends" got me.  I did that not long out of college and the software I produced doing such, by myself, is still in use almost 20 years later.


the software very likely had severe scope creep and no planning because Williams was selling vaporware that they were then trying to invent on the fly with no direction.

fta, what would have been the various PoCs was presented as the final products, and as any dev knows PoCs dont scale and have a shelf life of months at most.
 
2020-11-26 5:35:18 AM  

Geotpf: I'm just amazed Gameworks has fallen so far that this...um...thing managed to buy it.


Gameworks was in trouble long before that.  I went to one a few months after it opened in thecearly 2000s and it sucked as an arcade from the beginning.
 
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