Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Ars Technica)   Trippy cave drawings found to correspond to trippy plants   (arstechnica.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

702 clicks; posted to STEM » on 24 Nov 2020 at 1:06 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2020-11-24 3:26:50 PM  
3 votes:

MellowMauiMan: TwilightZone: Hmmm...were they chewing the leaves or the flowers?

Doesn't matter. Both will fark you up. A curious story from when the Spanish first encountered the plant: Seems that some soldiers thought the leaves resembled spinach, so they cooked up some, ate them, and spent days tripping balls.


Does matter -- the leaves smell nasty and taste really bad, while the flower has only a faint, some say sweet, smell, and I have no idea how it tastes.  I find that Spanish story suspect -- datura looks absolutely nothing like spinach and, as I said, tastes terrible, so I doubt any of them would have consumed enough of it to trip balls.  There are documented stories of people mistaking mandrake leaves for swiss chard (they do look similar) and tripping balls because mandrake has the same alkaloids as datura.
 
2020-11-24 2:18:50 PM  
3 votes:
Sounds like a terrible trip. And then there's the whole risk of death thing. Can't OD on shrooms.
 
2020-11-24 3:44:33 PM  
2 votes:
The local Native Americans from my area of California, the Yokut, had centuries of knowledge using datura as a hallucinogen. So far as we know, it was the only intoxicant they had. They brewed a tea from the roasted roots, which had to be harvested at a specific time of the year to ensure they were "safe", and people still occasionally died. According to the sources I've read, after consuming the tea, the taker fell into a deep sleep for 3 days, while they traveled in the spirit world. It was during these trips that one learned of their spirit animal. If the taker never awoke (died), it was said by the shamans that the allure of the spirit world was too strong and they had just decided to stay.

While I don't think I'll ever be brave enough to take a datura trip like that, I have added a small pinch of dried and ground tree datura (Brugmansia) flowers to marijuana bowls that I've vaped, and found the added sedating effects quite nice.
 
2020-11-24 12:05:43 PM  
2 votes:
In the before times I loved shrooms at a festival

media3.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-24 5:05:41 PM  
1 vote:

SansNeural: TwilightZone: amyldoanitrite: TwilightZone: amyldoanitrite: The local Native Americans from my area of California, the Yokut, had centuries of knowledge using datura as a hallucinogen. So far as we know, it was the only intoxicant they had. They brewed a tea from the roasted roots, which had to be harvested at a specific time of the year to ensure they were "safe", and people still occasionally died. According to the sources I've read, after consuming the tea, the taker fell into a deep sleep for 3 days, while they traveled in the spirit world. It was during these trips that one learned of their spirit animal. If the taker never awoke (died), it was said by the shamans that the allure of the spirit world was too strong and they had just decided to stay.

While I don't think I'll ever be brave enough to take a datura trip like that, I have added a small pinch of dried and ground tree datura (Brugmansia) flowers to marijuana bowls that I've vaped, and found the added sedating effects quite nice.

I read somewhere -- don't know the authenticity of this -- that English ladies used to put their teacups under the brugmansia flower and tap some pollen into the tea for the hallucinogenic effects.  You can find Datura ointment -- one of the ingredients of flying ointments (there are many recipes) online.

Interesting, but I doubt a dusting of pollen would deliver enough alkaloids to cause effects. Seems a little far fetched.

It does seem like microdosing -- then again, I've never tried knocking pollen off brugmansia flowers, so I have no idea how much it would put out.  Maybe if you collected enough pollen from many flowers?

NOW I think I'm starting to understand what's wrong with bees...


hallucinogenic honey is a thing.  Manunka honey.
 
2020-11-24 4:23:54 PM  
1 vote:

amyldoanitrite: TwilightZone: amyldoanitrite: The local Native Americans from my area of California, the Yokut, had centuries of knowledge using datura as a hallucinogen. So far as we know, it was the only intoxicant they had. They brewed a tea from the roasted roots, which had to be harvested at a specific time of the year to ensure they were "safe", and people still occasionally died. According to the sources I've read, after consuming the tea, the taker fell into a deep sleep for 3 days, while they traveled in the spirit world. It was during these trips that one learned of their spirit animal. If the taker never awoke (died), it was said by the shamans that the allure of the spirit world was too strong and they had just decided to stay.

While I don't think I'll ever be brave enough to take a datura trip like that, I have added a small pinch of dried and ground tree datura (Brugmansia) flowers to marijuana bowls that I've vaped, and found the added sedating effects quite nice.

I read somewhere -- don't know the authenticity of this -- that English ladies used to put their teacups under the brugmansia flower and tap some pollen into the tea for the hallucinogenic effects.  You can find Datura ointment -- one of the ingredients of flying ointments (there are many recipes) online.

Interesting, but I doubt a dusting of pollen would deliver enough alkaloids to cause effects. Seems a little far fetched.


It does seem like microdosing -- then again, I've never tried knocking pollen off brugmansia flowers, so I have no idea how much it would put out.  Maybe if you collected enough pollen from many flowers?
 
2020-11-24 4:17:20 PM  
1 vote:

TwilightZone: amyldoanitrite: The local Native Americans from my area of California, the Yokut, had centuries of knowledge using datura as a hallucinogen. So far as we know, it was the only intoxicant they had. They brewed a tea from the roasted roots, which had to be harvested at a specific time of the year to ensure they were "safe", and people still occasionally died. According to the sources I've read, after consuming the tea, the taker fell into a deep sleep for 3 days, while they traveled in the spirit world. It was during these trips that one learned of their spirit animal. If the taker never awoke (died), it was said by the shamans that the allure of the spirit world was too strong and they had just decided to stay.

While I don't think I'll ever be brave enough to take a datura trip like that, I have added a small pinch of dried and ground tree datura (Brugmansia) flowers to marijuana bowls that I've vaped, and found the added sedating effects quite nice.

I read somewhere -- don't know the authenticity of this -- that English ladies used to put their teacups under the brugmansia flower and tap some pollen into the tea for the hallucinogenic effects.  You can find Datura ointment -- one of the ingredients of flying ointments (there are many recipes) online.


Interesting, but I doubt a dusting of pollen would deliver enough alkaloids to cause effects. Seems a little far fetched.
 
2020-11-24 4:12:46 PM  
1 vote:

amyldoanitrite: The local Native Americans from my area of California, the Yokut, had centuries of knowledge using datura as a hallucinogen. So far as we know, it was the only intoxicant they had. They brewed a tea from the roasted roots, which had to be harvested at a specific time of the year to ensure they were "safe", and people still occasionally died. According to the sources I've read, after consuming the tea, the taker fell into a deep sleep for 3 days, while they traveled in the spirit world. It was during these trips that one learned of their spirit animal. If the taker never awoke (died), it was said by the shamans that the allure of the spirit world was too strong and they had just decided to stay.

While I don't think I'll ever be brave enough to take a datura trip like that, I have added a small pinch of dried and ground tree datura (Brugmansia) flowers to marijuana bowls that I've vaped, and found the added sedating effects quite nice.


I read somewhere -- don't know the authenticity of this -- that English ladies used to put their teacups under the brugmansia flower and tap some pollen into the tea for the hallucinogenic effects.  You can find Datura ointment -- one of the ingredients of flying ointments (there are many recipes) online.
 
2020-11-24 2:07:17 PM  
1 vote:

TwilightZone: Hmmm...were they chewing the leaves or the flowers?


Doesn't matter. Both will fark you up. A curious story from when the Spanish first encountered the plant: Seems that some soldiers thought the leaves resembled spinach, so they cooked up some, ate them, and spent days tripping balls.
 
Displayed 9 of 9 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.