Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Salon)   How do you teach kids civics in the age of unreason?   (salon.com) divider line
    More: Murica  
•       •       •

235 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 23 Nov 2020 at 9:50 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-11-23 9:36:38 AM  
Cry
 
2020-11-23 9:50:50 AM  
Have Civics class in high school like I did in 9th grade?
 
2020-11-23 9:58:32 AM  
Start with the mechanics.  Add nuance as they get older.

Schoolhouse rock videos in 3rd grade.  Mock elections.

Talk about persuasion, advertising, and propaganda in 6th grade.

Teach formal logic in 9th grade.  Include the 2-dozen-odd informal fallacies (appeal to authority, slippery slope, begging the question, etc.)

Do games in 7th-10th grade that show how tradeoffs and compromise work.  There are all sorts of great things in games theory from economics and sociology that are easily graspable by a 13-year-old.
 
2020-11-23 10:07:28 AM  
How old?  And are they your kids or a whole class where at least some are going to come from families where reason is frowned upon?
 
2020-11-23 10:21:30 AM  

FrancoFile: Start with the mechanics.  Add nuance as they get older.

Schoolhouse rock videos in 3rd grade.  Mock elections.

Talk about persuasion, advertising, and propaganda in 6th grade.

Teach formal logic in 9th grade.  Include the 2-dozen-odd informal fallacies (appeal to authority, slippery slope, begging the question, etc.)

Do games in 7th-10th grade that show how tradeoffs and compromise work.  There are all sorts of great things in games theory from economics and sociology that are easily graspable by a 13-year-old.


Well, yes.  This is exactly how.

I think the bigger question in play is how do you teach your child that, other children and people they're going to need to interact with in life, are going to be ignorance worshiping morons who will deliberately sabotage any effort at teaching as a liberal communist conspiracy plot mean to implant mind control chips in their brains to control them.  Schoolhouse Rock!?  Commie propaganda!  Bad!

Sorry kids, but Timmy's parents are imbeciles, who act against their own best interests.
 
2020-11-23 10:28:24 AM  
Yeah, the question assumes schools indeed TEACH civics. And not just as an elective.  I think based on my observations of my kids's public education, it has been ignored and downplayed for far too long, and the result is a generation that has a void where their sense of civic duty should be. Even just understanding the processes of government and elections, our rules and how and why thye evolved, and how they differ from those in other countries.
 
2020-11-23 10:36:51 AM  

Ker_Thwap: FrancoFile: Start with the mechanics.  Add nuance as they get older.

Schoolhouse rock videos in 3rd grade.  Mock elections.

Talk about persuasion, advertising, and propaganda in 6th grade.

Teach formal logic in 9th grade.  Include the 2-dozen-odd informal fallacies (appeal to authority, slippery slope, begging the question, etc.)

Do games in 7th-10th grade that show how tradeoffs and compromise work.  There are all sorts of great things in games theory from economics and sociology that are easily graspable by a 13-year-old.

Well, yes.  This is exactly how.

I think the bigger question in play is how do you teach your child that, other children and people they're going to need to interact with in life, are going to be ignorance worshiping morons who will deliberately sabotage any effort at teaching as a liberal communist conspiracy plot mean to implant mind control chips in their brains to control them.  Schoolhouse Rock!?  Commie propaganda!  Bad!

Sorry kids, but Timmy's parents are imbeciles, who act against their own best interests.


Maybe this should be the first lesson:
Okay, kids, over the next few months we're going to teach you how to be a responsible and empowered citizen of a democracy. Some people hate that and will do anything in their power to keep you stupid and powerless. They will lie to you, they will threaten you, and they will try to make you afraid of the wrong things. Let's keep track of who comes crawling out of the woodwork to complain once we start the unit.
 
2020-11-23 10:45:18 AM  
Put the lessons on Instagram.
 
2020-11-23 11:01:37 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-23 11:07:24 AM  
One big takeaway from the past election is that apparently, 1/3 of the adult population of this country slept through or skipped studying what is a democracy 101 and how the US government works in high school.
 
2020-11-23 11:18:20 AM  
You could always try raising them yourselves, instead of teaching them that money is more important than spending time with the kids from day one, when you yank them off mommy's boob and take them to daycare.

Other than that, I'm out of ideas.
 
2020-11-23 11:33:27 AM  
Read the comments on Fark and do the exact opposite.
 
2020-11-23 11:48:48 AM  
Same way as always, with primary documents and age appropriate analogies.

Does an elementary age kid need to know that state level certifications are many tiered and complicated?  No.  But they should know that there's a big day where everyone votes, and then after the votes are counted there's a second time where a lot fewer people vote and that second one is the one that actually counts.

Does a middle school age kid need to know that there's a dance that can happen in the House and Senate if multiple slates of electors are sent from an individual state?  No.  But they should know that after election day there is always a weeks long process of counting an certifying the results.

Does a high school age kid need to know most of the details of how the system works normally?  Yes, yes they do.

Do they need to know what protections exist in their own state and at the federal level against shenanigans?  Yes, yes they do.

A high school level civics class in any election year should cover scenarios from certification timelines to tied elections to two slates of electors etc etc.

If I were a civics teacher this year I would have had my students read the plain language of the law governing the GSA allocating funds for transition teams and talked a bunch about when someone becomes the "President Elect" in the process.  I would probably have had the later conversation regardless of the year as part of the discussion about what a "lame duck" is.

The answer to the question "what happens if President Trump does something outrageous" for a student should be "Lets talk through what the system should and shouldn't allow him to do" so the student can have an understanding of what is expected of someone in that position.
 
2020-11-23 11:49:21 AM  

SirEattonHogg: One big takeaway from the past election is that apparently, 1/3 of the adult population of this country slept through or skipped studying what is a democracy 101 and how the US government works in high school.


While I distinctly remember my classmates sleeping through civics class, I think a sizable part of 1/3 of the adult population is quite aware of how the US government is supposed to work and despises it.  This is certainly true of any dominionist who understands how it works.
 
2020-11-23 12:50:58 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: SirEattonHogg: One big takeaway from the past election is that apparently, 1/3 of the adult population of this country slept through or skipped studying what is a democracy 101 and how the US government works in high school.

While I distinctly remember my classmates sleeping through civics class, I think a sizable part of 1/3 of the adult population is quite aware of how the US government is supposed to work and despises it.  This is certainly true of any dominionist who understands how it works.


Yet they wrap themselves in an American flag and call themselves, "patriots".
 
2020-11-23 12:53:42 PM  
You have to start with the Dems in 2016.
 
2020-11-23 1:15:31 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-23 1:37:29 PM  
NOFX - Murder the Government
Youtube WD3lgI9QIV8
 
2020-11-23 2:39:20 PM  

BMFPitt: How old?  And are they your kids or a whole class where at least some are going to come from families where reason is frowned upon?


Logic and Reasoning has NEVER been included / encouraged in ANY homeschooling curriculum AFAIK

/Amen
//Praise White Jesus
///And Dale Earnhardt
 
2020-11-23 3:12:02 PM  

FrancoFile: Start with the mechanics.  Add nuance as they get older.

Teach formal logic in 9th grade.  Include the 2-dozen-odd informal fallacies (appeal to authority, slippery slope, begging the question, etc.)


Took a class in 9th grade that was pretty much that, called "Semantics".  Focused on various types of arguments, which were valid or invalid, and how to use words to bolster your argument.  A kind of introduction to Logic, though IIRC we just kind of touched on truth tables, to introduce the concept.  I think it was the best class I had during HS.  Along with Typing, probably the most useful.  You could easily tie it in with how to read statistics if you wanted to, as well.
 
2020-11-23 3:19:36 PM  

Billy Liar: FrancoFile: Start with the mechanics.  Add nuance as they get older.

Teach formal logic in 9th grade.  Include the 2-dozen-odd informal fallacies (appeal to authority, slippery slope, begging the question, etc.)

Took a class in 9th grade that was pretty much that, called "Semantics".  Focused on various types of arguments, which were valid or invalid, and how to use words to bolster your argument.  A kind of introduction to Logic, though IIRC we just kind of touched on truth tables, to introduce the concept.  I think it was the best class I had during HS.  Along with Typing, probably the most useful.  You could easily tie it in with how to read statistics if you wanted to, as well.


Username checks out
 
2020-11-23 5:18:17 PM  
 
2020-11-23 10:50:23 PM  
I was never taught any of this stuff in school. Is there a book anyone recommends I read to learn about all this and fill in some gigantic gaps? I'd also like to learn a bit about how other countries run their government and elections.
 
2020-11-24 4:36:19 AM  
The social studies dept. where I teach is broken into grade level/subject committees and I attend meetings for US and world history.  We are all grateful not to be teaching govt. this year because the suburb where I teach is a MAGAt hotbed.  The world history gang gets silent when Trump is mentioned like a family does when someone brings up the abusive, alcoholic uncle who's not invited to holidays anymore.
 
2020-11-24 11:00:07 AM  
Yet there is no living American who has experienced a political moment as polarized as this one, where even teachers cannot speak of T***p or Biden without accusations of impartiality from either direction.

I'm sure "partiality" was meant, but what the hey. The Flim Flam Führer is trying to subvert the election. It is not "partiality" to say that he is trying to subvert the election.
 
Displayed 25 of 25 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.