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(Gizmodo)   Engineering student finds an actual use for vegetables   (earther.gizmodo.com) divider line
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1552 clicks; posted to STEM » on 22 Nov 2020 at 10:05 AM (12 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-11-22 9:10:58 AM  
I assume besides the whole sautéed in butter thing....
 
2020-11-22 10:38:35 AM  
Extruded into structural components? Clicks article, Oh, OK.
 
2020-11-22 10:53:10 AM  
So they were brave enough?
 
2020-11-22 10:55:21 AM  
crop waste [...] contains luminescent particles. Maigue figured out a way to suspend those particles in a resin substrate. [...] those particles then absorb [ultraviolet light] and re-emit visible light along the edges.  Maigue placed photovoltaic cells along the edges of the material, which then turns the captured energy into DC electricity.


Hoo boy, there's a lot left unsaid in there. I'll ask of some of them:

(a) how much energy is expended collecting crop waste and extracting luminescent particles from it?
(b) what happens to the rest of the crop waste that wasn't luminescent particles?
(c) how much energy is expended in preparing a resin substrate and suspending luminescent particles in it?
(d) how long do these luminescent particles continue to operate as described?
(e) all that to collect a max of 20% (PV cell efficiency) of the already tiny fraction of UV light that comprises the full spectrum of solar irradiation at ground level?
 
2020-11-22 11:27:38 AM  
Farmers have been recycling crop waste for 12,000 years, but this genius figures out a way to "upcycle" a tiny portion of it using complicated technology, slaps the label "renewable" on it, and wins a farking award.  I think it's an interesting exercise, but come on, this isn't going to be a thing.

Better headline:  Engineering student finds the most inefficient conceivable use for vegetables.
 
2020-11-22 11:28:29 AM  
Have to get them outta the wheelchair first.
 
2020-11-22 11:41:54 AM  
So a "new" way of producing a Stokes shift.

Some Dead-Head's bedroom will now become a powerplant.
 
2020-11-22 11:46:37 AM  
yeah UV solar energy is going to waste.

https://ag.tennessee.edu/solar/Pages/​W​hat%20Is%20Solar%20Energy/Sunlight.asp​x
Much of the energy from the Sun arrives on Earth in the form of infrared radiation. Sunlight in space at the top of Earth's atmosphere at a power of 1366 watts/m2 is composed (by total energy) of about 50% infrared light, 40% visible light, and 10% ultraviolet light[1]. At ground level, this decreases to about 1120-1000 watts/m2, and consists of 44% visible light, 3% ultraviolet (with the Sun at the zenith (directly overhead), but less at other angles), and the remainder infrared. Thus, sunlight's composition at ground level, per square meter, with the sun at the zenith, is about 527 watts of infrared radiation, 445 watts of visible light, and 32 watts of ultraviolet radiation.

You would get a lot more electricity if you dedicated the ground area to normal solar cells.
 
2020-11-22 12:11:31 PM  
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2020-11-22 12:19:53 PM  
Subby sounds fat. With an immobile bowel.
 
2020-11-22 12:23:55 PM  

pearls before swine: Better headline: Engineering student finds the most inefficient conceivable use for vegetables.


Whoa, I just had an idea for a much more effective application of crop waste.

We collect all the vegetable rot and rub it all over our bodies.  A whole bunch of us get sick and die from it, thereby reducing the total human demand for energy, and those who survive will be more resistance to the ills of vegetable rot!
 
2020-11-22 12:38:14 PM  

HairBolus: yeah UV solar energy is going to waste.

https://ag.tennessee.edu/solar/Pages/W​hat%20Is%20Solar%20Energy/Sunlight.asp​x
Much of the energy from the Sun arrives on Earth in the form of infrared radiation. Sunlight in space at the top of Earth's atmosphere at a power of 1366 watts/m2 is composed (by total energy) of about 50% infrared light, 40% visible light, and 10% ultraviolet light[1]. At ground level, this decreases to about 1120-1000 watts/m2, and consists of 44% visible light, 3% ultraviolet (with the Sun at the zenith (directly overhead), but less at other angles), and the remainder infrared. Thus, sunlight's composition at ground level, per square meter, with the sun at the zenith, is about 527 watts of infrared radiation, 445 watts of visible light, and 32 watts of ultraviolet radiation.

You would get a lot more electricity if you dedicated the ground area to normal solar cells.


At zenith in clear weather, sure.  The point of the article is that ultraviolet light ignores things like clouds, so it can be used even in cloudy or foggy areas.

Still inefficient to a crazy degree, mind you, but it's still potentially useful.  Perhaps, since it's something that 'redirects', they could put it in the underlayers of solar panels and redirect to a common point, allowing more energy collection per square foot.
 
2020-11-22 12:43:28 PM  
the brainchild of Carvey Ehren Maigue

No wonder. He's spent lots of time

Fark user imageView Full Size


chopping broccoleeeeaay
 
2020-11-22 1:16:07 PM  
Potato battery?

Broccoli alternator?

Cauliflower and kale fusion?
 
2020-11-22 1:20:48 PM  

Exception Collection: At zenith in clear weather, sure. The point of the article is that ultraviolet light ignores things like clouds, so it can be used even in cloudy or foggy areas.


Except that that point is complete bullshiat.  Water droplets scatter ultraviolet just as much as visible light, and absorb it slightly more.  The claim that it can make use of diffuse light would be more accurately phrased as "This is almost as useless in direct sunlight as it is in scattered light."
 
2020-11-22 1:45:10 PM  

pearls before swine: Farmers have been recycling crop waste for 12,000 years, but this genius figures out a way to "upcycle" a tiny portion of it using complicated technology, slaps the label "renewable" on it, and wins a farking award.  I think it's an interesting exercise, but come on, this isn't going to be a thing.

Better headline:  Engineering student finds the most inefficient conceivable use for vegetables.


IANA (much of anything remotely close to this topic. Off the top of my head. I suspect the most efficient use of veggies is to consume them?
 
2020-11-22 1:56:24 PM  
I thought the simple way to turn rotting vegetables into renewable energy involved a still.
 
2020-11-22 1:56:26 PM  

pearls before swine: Farmers have been recycling crop waste for 12,000 years, but this genius figures out a way to "upcycle" a tiny portion of it using complicated technology, slaps the label "renewable" on it, and wins a farking award.  I think it's an interesting exercise, but come on, this isn't going to be a thing.
Better headline:  Engineering student finds the most inefficient conceivable use for vegetables.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-11-22 2:01:00 PM  
This is like saying that you've found a good use for all those feral cats out there, and they can be turned into casseroles. Sure they can, but why did we create millions of unwanted cats in the first place?

So somebody can profit from them, usually. You know what would "create" a lot more energy than that? If all of this excess didn't exist in the first place.
 
2020-11-22 2:22:55 PM  
One step closer to...

lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
2020-11-22 2:39:08 PM  

cryinoutloud: This is like saying that you've found a good use for all those feral cats out there, and they can be turned into casseroles. Sure they can, but why did we create millions of unwanted cats in the first place?

So somebody can profit from them, usually. You know what would "create" a lot more energy than that? If all of this excess didn't exist in the first place.


Catsserole. I would like a reservation for two at your fine dining restaurant
 
2020-11-22 2:48:32 PM  
There is a power plant in California that takes the waste from prepared onions and converts it to electricity using bacteria to ferment it to hydrocarbon fuel and then uses that hydrogen in a fuel cell. It is paying for itself plus a bit, so maybe we will get more of it in other food factory places.
 
2020-11-22 3:47:47 PM  
Lies! My boyfriend's children have no use.
 
2020-11-22 4:08:00 PM  
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2020-11-22 6:00:33 PM  
i.ytimg.comView Full Size

Vegetables are what food eats.
 
2020-11-22 8:45:19 PM  
This is "renewables reporting" designed to appeal to the "well would you look at that Martha... look what they have gone and done now" crowd. I would guess that the science underlying this is sound, but probably pretty boring and way way over the reporter's head, so it got dumbed down and dumbed down some more to the point where some kind of biomass rich in this or that hydrocarbon or polymer got described as "rotted vegetables."  So the reporter went with it, and here we are. We clicked. Others clicked. Mission accomplished.

The truth is that this is some variant of what has been ongoing for about a decade: development of bio-PV, for lack of a better term. This idea that there is some material that can be used more or less as PV, but organic, or bendable, or paintable, or what have you, has already produced at least 10 more or less effective materials to produce electricity from sunlight, or to produce hydrogen, or some syn-gas or another.

Throw it on the pile. It seems useless. There are lots of other things we can do with rotting vegetables.

Feed them to pigs, chickens, insects, or even worms. Compost them. Clean them, disinfect them, and pickle or cook them. All of these are more obvious things, and doable. You could process them with other biomass to produce methane, and THEN compost them too.
 
2020-11-23 6:38:53 AM  
I honestly feel that one of those all in one fertiliser/methane production units could create more energy by burning the gas to charge batteries. The fertiliser concentrate you get is liquid gold to any gardiner, too.

This product might be useful for covering a rucksack with to constantly drip charge your phone or GPS, I suppose.
 
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