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(CBS News)   Scientists discover Mars-sized rogue planet aimlessly zooming through the Milky Way. Three Musketeers put on alert   (cbsnews.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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617 clicks; posted to STEM » on 31 Oct 2020 at 6:20 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-10-31 2:07:36 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 2:09:04 AM  
Bravo summitter.
 
2020-10-31 10:11:44 AM  
Another one? Or is this the same planet from a couple days ago?
 
2020-10-31 10:14:06 AM  
 
2020-10-31 10:55:45 AM  
Fredric Brown would like a word.

/actually might be obscure, even for Fark.
 
2020-10-31 11:25:22 AM  
Rocket Robin Hood (Intro, Outro and All Vignettes)
Youtube I0YPN3sYIlI

it's him! he lives on a star.
 
2020-10-31 12:30:39 PM  
Good thing this rogue planet isn't headed for Earth, or I know I'd have a sense of Melancholia about it.
 
2020-10-31 2:26:26 PM  
Microlensing suggests small black hole more than rogue planet. Planets lack the mass to do this.
 
2020-10-31 3:02:27 PM  

Harlee: Fredric Brown would like a word.

/actually might be obscure, even for Fark.


Ok, I'll bite.  I've seen rogue planets nearly everywhere in science fiction - Star Trek, "Doc" Smith, John W..Campbell Jr., Philip Wylie, and many, many more, to the point where they all start to run together. 

Remind me - what was Fred Brown's story?
 
2020-10-31 3:27:56 PM  
This headline made me Snicker.
 
2020-10-31 3:34:51 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Harlee: Fredric Brown would like a word.

/actually might be obscure, even for Fark.

Ok, I'll bite.  I've seen rogue planets nearly everywhere in science fiction - Star Trek, "Doc" Smith, John W..Campbell Jr., Philip Wylie, and many, many more, to the point where they all start to run together. 

Remind me - what was Fred Brown's story?


That would be telling.  I don't think that is how a Fark "Obscure?" challenge works.

But I'm honored that no one has yet figured it out. That's a first for me.

Not too difficult, though. Google is your friend.
 
2020-10-31 3:37:48 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 4:50:11 PM  

Drunk Southern Taser Bait: [Fark user image image 300x225]


orsen wells is back!?
 
2020-10-31 5:44:17 PM  

Harlee: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Harlee: Fredric Brown would like a word.

/actually might be obscure, even for Fark.

Ok, I'll bite.  I've seen rogue planets nearly everywhere in science fiction - Star Trek, "Doc" Smith, John W..Campbell Jr., Philip Wylie, and many, many more, to the point where they all start to run together. 

Remind me - what was Fred Brown's story?

That would be telling.  I don't think that is how a Fark "Obscure?" challenge works.

But I'm honored that no one has yet figured it out. That's a first for me.

Not too difficult, though. Google is your friend.


Got it.  'Rogue in Space'.  Haven't read it.  I'll be hitting McKay's Used Books sometime soon, we'll see if they have a copy.
 
2020-10-31 7:23:53 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Harlee: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Harlee: Fredric Brown would like a word.

/actually might be obscure, even for Fark.

Ok, I'll bite.  I've seen rogue planets nearly everywhere in science fiction - Star Trek, "Doc" Smith, John W..Campbell Jr., Philip Wylie, and many, many more, to the point where they all start to run together. 

Remind me - what was Fred Brown's story?

That would be telling.  I don't think that is how a Fark "Obscure?" challenge works.

But I'm honored that no one has yet figured it out. That's a first for me.

Not too difficult, though. Google is your friend.

Got it.  'Rogue in Space'.  Haven't read it.  I'll be hitting McKay's Used Books sometime soon, we'll see if they have a copy.


It might be hard to find, as I don't think it was too popular. Got panned by a couple of big name sci-fi authors of the day. It was a mixup of two of Brown's lesser short stories, and got criticized because it wasn't funny (one of Brown's hallmarks). Here's some info on it (spoiler warning).

http://mporcius.blogspot.com/2016/01/​r​ogue-in-space-by-frederic-brown.html
 
2020-11-01 12:59:35 AM  
This'll be the first of a 100 Grand of these found, as I'm sure they're Good and Plenty of them.
 
2020-11-01 10:02:59 AM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: This'll be the first of a 100 Grand of these found, as I'm sure they're Good and Plenty of them.


If you're right, this would be a big deal for interstellar travel, don't want to hit a rock when you're going really fast.
 
2020-11-01 12:54:05 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: This'll be the first of a 100 Grand of these found, as I'm sure they're Good and Plenty of them.


They're all over the Milky Way!
 
2020-11-01 1:06:38 PM  

madgonad: Microlensing suggests small black hole more than rogue planet. Planets lack the mass to do this.


I was wondering about that myself.
 
2020-11-01 6:11:54 PM  
static.tvtropes.orgView Full Size

I'm sure it's fine.
 
2020-11-01 6:26:02 PM  
You mean the Malted Milky Way, Subby.

Earth destroyed by nougat. I'm ok with that.
 
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