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(Food Network)   What's the best berry to use in cooking? And don't say Mary   (foodnetwork.com) divider line
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699 clicks; posted to Food » on 31 Oct 2020 at 5:50 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-31 2:29:23 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 2:44:57 AM  
available commercially? - raspberries
mana of the gods yet exists on earth - thimbleberries
 
433 [TotalFark]
2020-10-31 3:51:36 AM  
The butterberry.  You can get bunches of it in the dairy aisle, usually about four bunches to the pound.  They already have it ready, you just slice off as much as you like and put it on in.  The butterberry makes just about everything taste a lot better.
 
2020-10-31 6:05:11 AM  
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2020-10-31 6:13:07 AM  
Blueberry and wild blackberries are the two I'm partial to.
 
2020-10-31 6:15:56 AM  
Halle.
 
2020-10-31 6:25:48 AM  
I don't know. Boo or Franken, it's a tough choice.
 
2020-10-31 6:52:33 AM  
Aronia
 
2020-10-31 6:55:58 AM  

Kat09tails: available commercially? - raspberries
mana of the gods yet exists on earth - thimbleberries


Where do you find thimbleberries in enough quantity to cook with? We have thimbleberries in our forest that yeild 1 or 2 ripe berries at a time.
My 3 year old raspberry vines are going nuts, 2 cups of berries a week. Raspberries out of the garden over a bowl of cheerios with milk and a little sugar is a simple fall pleasure. Raspberry everything please til the vines quit for the year...
 
2020-10-31 8:15:51 AM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: [Fark user image 315x210]


This. I would also accept Tomatoes.
 
2020-10-31 8:46:22 AM  

Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image image 850x1085]


thefamouspeople.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 8:48:48 AM  
pomegranates (botanically a berry!)

But if not that, cranberry.
 
2020-10-31 9:04:53 AM  
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 9:10:30 AM  
This is another area where pretty much everything with "berry" in its name isn't a berry, botanically. Like with nuts, where most of the things we call nuts aren't actually nuts.

We should lock all botanists, lexicographers and chefs into a conference hall for a couple of days and get them to sort their shiat out.
 
2020-10-31 9:17:20 AM  
With a 7 cube freezer full of home-grown blueberries, need I answer?
 
2020-10-31 9:21:42 AM  
Huckleberries. Really hard to find but they taste amazing. Sporadically found at the farmers market or go into the woods and pick em yourself.
 
2020-10-31 9:46:02 AM  

BunkyBrewman: pomegranates (botanically a berry!)

But if not that, cranberry.


Cranberries aren't berries. (Neither are blueberries).

****

Raspberries #1
Blackberries #2
 
2020-10-31 9:46:27 AM  

Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image 850x1085]


Ding a Lings?
 
2020-10-31 9:50:25 AM  
Oh, and to the other issue in the headline. I couldn't stand Mary Berry at first -- she seemed to be an English Junior League biddy -- but she grew on me, as they say. She was always a good sport. She caught the references/jokes that Mel and Sue came up with. And treated the obvious baking failures decently. I'd have loved to have had her as aunt you visited during the holidays.
 
2020-10-31 9:59:37 AM  
Amontillado.  It's nutty and not too sweet.  Great to put a slug into soups like French onion or beef & barley.

What?

Oh...  Berry.  I thought you said Sherry.  Never mind.
 
2020-10-31 10:03:22 AM  

yakmans_dad: BunkyBrewman: pomegranates (botanically a berry!)

But if not that, cranberry.

Cranberries aren't berries. (Neither are blueberries).

****

Raspberries #1
Blackberries #2


You have that backwards. Botanically, cranberries and blueberries are berries, but raspberries and blackberries aren't.
 
2020-10-31 10:08:19 AM  

yakmans_dad: BunkyBrewman: pomegranates (botanically a berry!)

But if not that, cranberry.

Cranberries aren't berries. (Neither are blueberries).

****

Raspberries #1
Blackberries #2


Botanically, you've got that backwards, blueberries and cranberries are berries, raspberries and blackberries are not.
 
2020-10-31 10:09:02 AM  

yakmans_dad: BunkyBrewman: pomegranates (botanically a berry!)

But if not that, cranberry.

Cranberries aren't berries. (Neither are blueberries).

****

Raspberries #1
Blackberries #2


I think you've got it backward. Botanically, raspberries and blackberries are aggregate fruit, composed of drupelets. Cranberries and blueberries are both true berries.

I like huckleberries the most, but they're a real pain to gather. I'm a pretty big fan of banana bread, too (they're also berries!).
 
2020-10-31 10:09:16 AM  

iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: BunkyBrewman: pomegranates (botanically a berry!)

But if not that, cranberry.

Cranberries aren't berries. (Neither are blueberries).

****

Raspberries #1
Blackberries #2

You have that backwards. Botanically, cranberries and blueberries are berries, but raspberries and blackberries aren't.


Yeah, what he said.
 
2020-10-31 10:10:57 AM  

Cyber Duck: Yeah, what he said.


Hahaha - I was very late to the party. My fellow pedants are out in force today.
 
2020-10-31 10:13:01 AM  

Numbat: yakmans_dad: BunkyBrewman: pomegranates (botanically a berry!)

But if not that, cranberry.

Cranberries aren't berries. (Neither are blueberries).

****

Raspberries #1
Blackberries #2

I think you've got it backward. Botanically, raspberries and blackberries are aggregate fruit, composed of drupelets. Cranberries and blueberries are both true berries.

I like huckleberries the most, but they're a real pain to gather. I'm a pretty big fan of banana bread, too (they're also berries!).


As are strawberries.
 
2020-10-31 10:15:58 AM  
Also:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 10:19:13 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Very popular in Oregon, for some reason
 
2020-10-31 10:31:23 AM  
Google: Are cranberries a berry

Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

You all are right about raspberries and blackberries. They aren't berries either. On QI one of funnier episodes had a question: What did Stephen J Gould decide about fish?

A. He decided there was no such thing.

So let it be with Caesar. And berries. Apparently.
 
2020-10-31 10:39:23 AM  

yakmans_dad: Google: Are cranberries a berry

Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.


Where are you getting that? I find things like this:

Moreover, to be a berry, fruits must develop from one flower that has one ovary, Jernstedt said. Some plants, such as the blueberry, have flowers with just one ovary. Hence, the blueberry is a true berry, she said. Tomatoes, peppers, cranberries, eggplants and kiwis come from a flower with one ovary, and so are also berries, she said.


You all are right about raspberries and blackberries. They aren't berries either. On QI one of funnier episodes had a question: What did Stephen J Gould decide about fish?

A. He decided there was no such thing.

So let it be with Caesar. And berries. Apparently.


Some of the QI elves also do a QI-ish podcast, No Such Thing as a Fish.
 
2020-10-31 10:50:45 AM  

iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: Google: Are cranberries a berry

Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

Where are you getting that?


Google: Are cranberries fruit.

[very Weeners]
https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna403393​1​0

Cranberries aren't really berries at all
Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.
 
2020-10-31 10:53:18 AM  
yakmans_dad and the thought crosses my mind, if you like QI, you might enjoy The Infinite Monkey Cage, too. Hosted by Brian Cox, and the comedian Robin Ince. Relevant to the thread, one of their shows on the subject of death got quite a lot of discussion on when strawberries are considered dead.
 
2020-10-31 11:00:31 AM  

yakmans_dad: iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: Google: Are cranberries a berry

Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

Where are you getting that?

Google: Are cranberries fruit.

[very Weeners]
https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna4033931​0

Cranberries aren't really berries at all
Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.


But that's a news article, not a botanical citation. Can you find a citation from an academic source?
 
2020-10-31 11:30:58 AM  

iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: Google: Are cranberries a berry

Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

Where are you getting that?

Google: Are cranberries fruit.

[very Weeners]
https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna4033931​0

Cranberries aren't really berries at all
Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

But that's a news article, not a botanical citation. Can you find a citation from an academic source?


To delve deeper into the realm of obscure botanical terms, we should consider lumpers versus splitters.   Here's a quote from Scagel, et al. in "An Evolutionary Survey of the Plant Kingdom":

"When applying names to different kinds of fruits, botanists differ considerably in usage.  Some emphasize the nature of the pericarp, without concern for the number of carpels or whether the ovary is superior or inferior.  Other botanists...feel that the names should carry ontogenetic implications.  The former botanists are akin to the "lumpers" of taxonomy, whereas the latter are the "splitters".

It's a relief to know that those 9 years of post-secondary education weren't a total waste.
 
2020-10-31 11:54:40 AM  

Gough: iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: Google: Are cranberries a berry

Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

Where are you getting that?

Google: Are cranberries fruit.

[very Weeners]
https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna4033931​0

Cranberries aren't really berries at all
Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

But that's a news article, not a botanical citation. Can you find a citation from an academic source?

To delve deeper into the realm of obscure botanical terms, we should consider lumpers versus splitters.   Here's a quote from Scagel, et al. in "An Evolutionary Survey of the Plant Kingdom":

"When applying names to different kinds of fruits, botanists differ considerably in usage.  Some emphasize the nature of the pericarp, without concern for the number of carpels or whether the ovary is superior or inferior.  Other botanists...feel that the names should carry ontogenetic implications.  The former botanists are akin to the "lumpers" of taxonomy, whereas the latter are the "splitters".

It's a relief to know that those 9 years of post-secondary education weren't a total waste.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 12:08:40 PM  

WoolyManwich: Huckleberries. Really hard to find but they taste amazing. Sporadically found at the farmers market or go into the woods and pick em yourself.


They are pretty common around here, but one must be very careful as bears love them too!
 
2020-10-31 12:11:54 PM  

rosekolodny: Gough: iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: iron de havilland: yakmans_dad: Google: Are cranberries a berry

Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

Where are you getting that?

Google: Are cranberries fruit.

[very Weeners]
https://www.nbcnews.com/id/wbna4033931​0

Cranberries aren't really berries at all
Blueberries and cranberries are close cousins and are in fact not berries at all; they belong instead to a class of fruits known as epigynous or false berries. Unlike a true berry, the fruit grows from beneath the rest of the flower parts, and as the fruit ripens the flower stays attached and ripens as well.

But that's a news article, not a botanical citation. Can you find a citation from an academic source?

To delve deeper into the realm of obscure botanical terms, we should consider lumpers versus splitters.   Here's a quote from Scagel, et al. in "An Evolutionary Survey of the Plant Kingdom":

"When applying names to different kinds of fruits, botanists differ considerably in usage.  Some emphasize the nature of the pericarp, without concern for the number of carpels or whether the ovary is superior or inferior.  Other botanists...feel that the names should carry ontogenetic implications.  The former botanists are akin to the "lumpers" of taxonomy, whereas the latter are the "splitters".

It's a relief to know that those 9 years of post-secondary education weren't a total waste.

[Fark user image image 320x152]


You want me to have an abortion, don't you?
 
2020-10-31 12:20:20 PM  
I bet Nigel Thornberry can make you laugh!!!
Youtube xXP9WBmNqJU
 
2020-10-31 12:20:41 PM  

WoolyManwich: Huckleberries. Really hard to find but they taste amazing. Sporadically found at the farmers market or go into the woods and pick em yourself.


omg yes.

Huckleberry jam really is the best thing on pancakes.
 
2020-10-31 12:44:39 PM  

iron de havilland: You have that backwards. Botanically, cranberries and blueberries are berries, but raspberries and blackberries aren't.


I believe the botanically correct term for blackberries, raspberries, and the like is "cane fruit".
 
2020-10-31 12:45:27 PM  

skiinstructor: Kat09tails: available commercially? - raspberries
mana of the gods yet exists on earth - thimbleberries

Where do you find thimbleberries in enough quantity to cook with? We have thimbleberries in our forest that yeild 1 or 2 ripe berries at a time.
My 3 year old raspberry vines are going nuts, 2 cups of berries a week. Raspberries out of the garden over a bowl of cheerios with milk and a little sugar is a simple fall pleasure. Raspberry everything please til the vines quit for the year...


Cottage country used to have them on the side of the road. We'd fill margarine containers (the large ones) with them for making cobblers with.

But that was decades ago now.

Now I prefer berries that have been left to age a while, and then often distilled.
 
2020-10-31 1:03:04 PM  

Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image 850x1085]


Fark user imageView Full Size


Well you certain don't want Marvin in the kitchen. That poor guy will just cut his hand and bleed everywhere.
 
2020-10-31 1:17:17 PM  
This thread is not as fun as I had imagined
 
2020-10-31 1:22:04 PM  

iron de havilland: This is another area where pretty much everything with "berry" in its name isn't a berry, botanically. Like with nuts, where most of the things we call nuts aren't actually nuts.

We should lock all botanists, lexicographers and chefs into a conference hall for a couple of days and get them to sort their shiat out.


I wouldn't, the chefs would bring their knives.
 
2020-10-31 1:38:16 PM  

SquonkBot: This thread is not as fun as I had imagined


Hey, it's better than those repeated, "bananas are not fruits, they are herbs" discussions that we've had in the past.


For those of you who missed the fun, bananas don't grow on trees, the plants themselves are herbs, which, to a botanist, means a non-woody plant.  The fruit of the banana plant, like that from potato plant, is a berry.
 
2020-10-31 1:58:16 PM  
No love for the caper berry?

Possibly NSFW

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-31 2:02:32 PM  
Dingleberries are definitely the worst berries to use in cooking.
 
2020-10-31 2:24:01 PM  
For me, each has their own purpose. Cherries make the best pie and cheesecake, Strawberry jam\jelly\preserves is classic pbj fodder, nothing beats raspberry filling in a jelly donut, fresh blueberries are heavenly in plain yogurt with honey, and thanksgiving without cranberries represented in some form is unspeakable and outright blasphemous..
 
2020-10-31 2:24:51 PM  

Bonzo_1116: WoolyManwich: Huckleberries. Really hard to find but they taste amazing. Sporadically found at the farmers market or go into the woods and pick em yourself.

omg yes.

Huckleberry jam really is the best thing on pancakes.


Yep, I agree..
Fark user imageView Full Size

The huckleberries were picked about 25 minutes from my house. It takes a while to pick a gallon of berries but well worth it.  Hanging out in the woods , picking berries...it's a wonderful thing during a pandemic.
 
2020-10-31 2:27:38 PM  
img-9gag-fun.9cache.comView Full Size
 
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