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(Engadget)   Team behind driver-less race car explains that the car crashed into a wall because, well mostly because there was nobody to turn the steering wheel   (engadget.com) divider line
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578 clicks; posted to STEM » on 30 Oct 2020 at 9:19 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-30 8:57:39 PM  
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2020-10-30 9:25:26 PM  
If you program a robot car to continuously turn in a specific direction, you shouldn't be surprised if the robot car takes that literally.
 
2020-10-30 9:45:00 PM  
Was it a Ferrari?
 
2020-10-30 10:17:33 PM  
FTA: "When our car was given [permission] to drive, the acceleration command went as normal but the steering was locked to the right," the engineer wrote. "We are looking at the log values and can see that our controller was trying to steer the car back to the left, but the car did not execute the steering command due to a steering lock. The desired trajectory was also good; the car definitely did not plan to go into the wall."

I'm a little surprised they didn't program in a failsafe designed to detect such a circumstance and apply the brakes to prevent a crash. Perhaps a few lines of code to compare the commanded vs actual steering values, and stop the car if they differ too much.
 
2020-10-31 8:54:19 AM  

LurkerSupreme: FTA: "When our car was given [permission] to drive, the acceleration command went as normal but the steering was locked to the right," the engineer wrote. "We are looking at the log values and can see that our controller was trying to steer the car back to the left, but the car did not execute the steering command due to a steering lock. The desired trajectory was also good; the car definitely did not plan to go into the wall."

I'm a little surprised they didn't program in a failsafe designed to detect such a circumstance and apply the brakes to prevent a crash. Perhaps a few lines of code to compare the commanded vs actual steering values, and stop the car if they differ too much.


Yeah, something I learned over 25 years ago as an embedded systems developer was to gracefully bring things to a stop when your inputs don't match your outputs for device control.
I understand why this happened, but a little defensive programming goes a long way.
 
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