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(The Hollywood Reporter)   Amazon tries to explain to their customers that just because they purchased something does't mean that they own it   (hollywoodreporter.com) divider line
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2289 clicks; posted to Business » on 29 Oct 2020 at 1:17 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-28 9:04:52 PM  
'Murica.
 
2020-10-28 9:17:46 PM  
"An individual does not need to read an agreement in order to be bound by it,"

Hope someone comes up with a creative way to f*ck Amazon with that argument.
 
2020-10-28 10:02:53 PM  
This is why I still buy physical media.  Streaming media is a convenience, but a scam.
 
2020-10-28 11:32:02 PM  
Meh...that's sort of standard nowadays. I thought this was going to be about physical stuff. I bought matching tacky xmas pajamas. I bought the sizes we are based on all our clothes that are our sizes. Both of my bitties thought they were a little tight. I bought them on Prime Day. So for the return they only offered a refund. Meaning I'd have to pay a higher price to order a different size.

I talked to customer service and thought maybe they could just ship out the next size up and I'd send back the ones we had. It was Amazon Fulfillment, so I figured, they have all this stuff in their warehouse. They couldn't do it. The rep I had offered to get the "price matching" team involved. That guy comes on and indignantly says, "You ordered that size and that's what was delivered. We can't help you." I'm like, I ordered the size we are and what was sent was too small. Nope. Rude, as well.

Drew P Balls: This is why I still buy physical media.  Streaming media is a convenience, but a scam.


I still buy CDs...sometimes I take advantage of the autorip feature. The CD shows up and I don't even unwrap it. But I keep it. Because eventually that mp3 file is going to become shiat and I want to rip the .wav file.
 
2020-10-28 11:34:11 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Many people rejected his message because it was more convenient to subscribe to services as a substitute for software.

And because he told them the truth: https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-​t​o-read.en.html
 
2020-10-29 12:35:58 AM  

Drew P Balls: This is why I still buy physical media.  Streaming media is a convenience, but a scam.


Subscription services aren't a scam. I'm happy to pay $0.50 per hour for entertainment. But using the word "buy" for streaming media is rather misleading.
 
2020-10-29 1:22:26 AM  

AliceBToklasLives: But using the word "buy" for streaming media is rather misleading.


This. I can buy an audiobook in a digital-only format, but it doesn't go away when the original vendor doesn't host the download for me. Anything that doesn't let you do that isn't really a purchase.
 
2020-10-29 1:45:55 AM  

Twilight Farkle: [Fark user image 480x451]

Many people rejected his message because it was more convenient to subscribe to services as a substitute for software.

And because he told them the truth: https://www.gnu.org/philosophy/right-t​o-read.en.html


Change my mind: GPL3 is a pox on OSS.
 
2020-10-29 2:06:03 AM  
The book out front should've told ya.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-29 2:06:35 AM  

AliceBToklasLives: Drew P Balls: This is why I still buy physical media.  Streaming media is a convenience, but a scam.

Subscription services aren't a scam. I'm happy to pay $0.50 per hour for entertainment. But using the word "buy" for streaming media is rather misleading.


But legal.
 
2020-10-29 2:30:06 AM  
I buy kindle books but the first thing I do is strip the DRM and make backups.
 
2020-10-29 2:52:46 AM  

Russ1642: I buy kindle books but the first thing I do is strip the DRM and make backups.


Yeah but, at that point, you might as well just pirate the whole thing.
 
2020-10-29 3:10:41 AM  
Here we go again, the main argument for keeping physical media available, without any sort of online verification. It's not rural Internet connections, it's not archival, it's licensing. Regardless of whether Disney wants to vault Bambi, you still have it in your VHS collection, and even if they could get some coked-up courts to rule in favor of physically revoking your DVDs, the logistics would be terrifying.

If it has DRM that requires online verification, you don't own it.
If you can crack that DRM, you're a pirate in their eyes, even if it's to play the media you legally purchased.
If you have it on an external library hosted by a third party, you don't own it.
Welcome to copyright hell.
 
2020-10-29 3:22:07 AM  
The problem with the cloud is that sometimes the cloud disappears and blows away.

Make physical backups.
 
2020-10-29 3:49:59 AM  
So are there no more property rights now???
 
2020-10-29 4:49:20 AM  

Bennie Crabtree: So are there no more property rights now???


This is streamed content. There was no property to own. A little different from the RIAA/MPAA argument that you didn't own the music on the CDs or movies on the VHS tapes sitting on your shelf.
 
2020-10-29 5:35:21 AM  

jaylectricity: Meh...that's sort of standard nowadays. I thought this was going to be about physical stuff. I bought matching tacky xmas pajamas. I bought the sizes we are based on all our clothes that are our sizes. Both of my bitties thought they were a little tight. I bought them on Prime Day. So for the return they only offered a refund. Meaning I'd have to pay a higher price to order a different size.

I talked to customer service and thought maybe they could just ship out the next size up and I'd send back the ones we had. It was Amazon Fulfillment, so I figured, they have all this stuff in their warehouse. They couldn't do it. The rep I had offered to get the "price matching" team involved. That guy comes on and indignantly says, "You ordered that size and that's what was delivered. We can't help you." I'm like, I ordered the size we are and what was sent was too small. Nope. Rude, as well.

Drew P Balls: This is why I still buy physical media.  Streaming media is a convenience, but a scam.

I still buy CDs...sometimes I take advantage of the autorip feature. The CD shows up and I don't even unwrap it. But I keep it. Because eventually that mp3 file is going to become shiat and I want to rip the .wav file.


I went back to buying the CD's when possible and bonus if autorip is included. I might buy a single song as a download.  Same with dvd/bluray. I own it as long as a player is available and i do wonder how much longer those will be available.
 
2020-10-29 6:16:07 AM  
If that's what the agreement says, then that's what it says. If you choose to just "I accept" versus reading said agreement, then that's on you. You think these guys are in this for you?
 
2020-10-29 6:24:31 AM  
I bought a couple of films because they were on offer, much cheaper than the blu-ray and less than 2 rentals. I figured if I watched The Raid twice, it would be worth it.

It cracks me up that people buy the digital versions of major (£50) games from Nintendo. Same price as physical media, but I know I'll get £20+ when I sell Mario Kart.
 
2020-10-29 6:39:10 AM  
Hasn't this been going on for years with operating systems?  You don't own your copy of Windows, you purchased a license to use it.
 
2020-10-29 6:53:10 AM  
If you "buy" something, but don't have independent access to it, you haven't actually bought it. Which is why I still get DVDs\Blurays, and prefer Good Old Games to Steam.
 
2020-10-29 6:54:49 AM  
Read the EULA.

Ha jk no one reads that shiat.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-29 7:02:16 AM  

Nullav: Here we go again, the main argument for keeping physical media available, without any sort of online verification. It's not rural Internet connections, it's not archival, it's licensing. Regardless of whether Disney wants to vault Bambi, you still have it in your VHS collection, and even if they could get some coked-up courts to rule in favor of physically revoking your DVDs, the logistics would be terrifying.

If it has DRM that requires online verification, you don't own it.
If you can crack that DRM, you're a pirate in their eyes, even if it's to play the media you legally purchased.
If you have it on an external library hosted by a third party, you don't own it.
Welcome to copyright hell.


Copyright was meant to be a limited monopoly on content by the content creator. Thanks to capitalists in general and Disney in particular, it's effectively permanent ownership. And since they broke the rules there's no reason everyone shouldn't too. So pirate and redistribute everything you can.
 
2020-10-29 7:27:34 AM  
Is that a straight press release from Amazon's legal department or something? They didn't even bother suggesting they asked the plaintiff's attorney for a comment.
 
2020-10-29 7:31:50 AM  

bfh0417: If that's what the agreement says, then that's what it says. If you choose to just "I accept" versus reading said agreement, then that's on you. You think these guys are in this for you?


Isn't that still 'TBD' by the courts, depending on a whole lot of the specifics of the situation?
 
2020-10-29 8:13:28 AM  

Wave Of Anal Fury: Hasn't this been going on for years with operating systems?  You don't own your copy of Windows, you purchased a license to use it.


Afaik, it's like this in some form or another with not only most software but a good chunk of digital distribution platforms out there.  GoG is kind of the exception as they offer everything DRM free.

That being said, I did "purchase" a few things through Amazon Video, but mainly because I occasionally have things shipped via Prime No Rush shipping so I get a few bucks in digital credit every now and then.

/Just got Ex Machina a few weeks back, because nekkid robots are sexy.
 
2020-10-29 8:45:17 AM  
Jeff Bezos can have my VHS collection when he pries it out of my cold dead hands.
 
2020-10-29 8:45:57 AM  

OptimisticCynicism: AliceBToklasLives: But using the word "buy" for streaming media is rather misleading.

This. I can buy an audiobook in a digital-only format, but it doesn't go away when the original vendor doesn't host the download for me. Anything that doesn't let you do that isn't really a purchase.


I know there was at least one instance a while back where an e-book was actually recalled due to a rights issue.  I don't remember if it was Apple or Amazon, but the book disappeared with the next sync and a credit was put in the users' accounts.
 
2020-10-29 8:52:28 AM  

NeoCortex42: OptimisticCynicism: AliceBToklasLives: But using the word "buy" for streaming media is rather misleading.

This. I can buy an audiobook in a digital-only format, but it doesn't go away when the original vendor doesn't host the download for me. Anything that doesn't let you do that isn't really a purchase.

I know there was at least one instance a while back where an e-book was actually recalled due to a rights issue.  I don't remember if it was Apple or Amazon, but the book disappeared with the next sync and a credit was put in the users' accounts.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-29 9:16:20 AM  
Everything is gradually moving towards a rentier economy. Nobody really owns anything, you either rent it from someone else or rent it to someone else. Sort of like beer.
 
2020-10-29 9:23:19 AM  
Works well for Apple
 
2020-10-29 9:45:19 AM  
They told you they'd screw you, so what's your problem?
 
2020-10-29 11:21:36 AM  
Amazon should explain to their customers what became of free 2-day shipping with prime.

I mean, we all know it's 'because fark you', but it'd be nice to hear them admit it. I think they have perpetrated the biggest rip-off 'because of the pandemic' of anybody. We'll get it to you in a week or ten days, and you'll like it.

I altered the deal. Pray that I don't alter it further.
 
2020-10-29 11:25:06 AM  

Schlubbe: Amazon should explain to their customers what became of free 2-day shipping with prime.

I mean, we all know it's 'because fark you', but it'd be nice to hear them admit it. I think they have perpetrated the biggest rip-off 'because of the pandemic' of anybody. We'll get it to you in a week or ten days, and you'll like it.

I altered the deal. Pray that I don't alter it further.


I'd be happy if they'd just explain the lack of decent packaging recently. Usually I end up with an item just loosely banging around inside an oversized box with zero padding or air bubbles or anything.
 
2020-10-29 11:33:07 AM  

NeoCortex42: Schlubbe: Amazon should explain to their customers what became of free 2-day shipping with prime.

I mean, we all know it's 'because fark you', but it'd be nice to hear them admit it. I think they have perpetrated the biggest rip-off 'because of the pandemic' of anybody. We'll get it to you in a week or ten days, and you'll like it.

I altered the deal. Pray that I don't alter it further.

I'd be happy if they'd just explain the lack of decent packaging recently. Usually I end up with an item just loosely banging around inside an oversized box with zero padding or air bubbles or anything.


"We don't have to care anymore"
 
kab
2020-10-29 11:33:35 AM  
Old news is so great.

In general, if you can't hold the physical version of a product in your hand, you're renting it at best.
 
2020-10-29 12:41:26 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: Nullav: Here we go again, the main argument for keeping physical media available, without any sort of online verification. It's not rural Internet connections, it's not archival, it's licensing. Regardless of whether Disney wants to vault Bambi, you still have it in your VHS collection, and even if they could get some coked-up courts to rule in favor of physically revoking your DVDs, the logistics would be terrifying.

If it has DRM that requires online verification, you don't own it.
If you can crack that DRM, you're a pirate in their eyes, even if it's to play the media you legally purchased.
If you have it on an external library hosted by a third party, you don't own it.
Welcome to copyright hell.

Copyright was meant to be a limited monopoly on content by the content creator. Thanks to capitalists in general and Disney in particular, it's effectively permanent ownership. And since they broke the rules there's no reason everyone shouldn't too. So pirate and redistribute everything you can.


And the irony is that Disney is built on the public domain. Walt Disney died a long time ago and is absurd to see near hundred-year-old cartoons still under copyright.

It's worth remembering that the point of Copyright (per the Constitution) is to encourage creative work. And no amount of IP protection can encourage Walt  to create new work.

(And the mouse ears are protected by trademarks, so that's not an issue.)
 
2020-10-29 7:28:18 PM  

Tyrone Slothrop: Nullav: Here we go again, the main argument for keeping physical media available, without any sort of online verification. It's not rural Internet connections, it's not archival, it's licensing. Regardless of whether Disney wants to vault Bambi, you still have it in your VHS collection, and even if they could get some coked-up courts to rule in favor of physically revoking your DVDs, the logistics would be terrifying.

If it has DRM that requires online verification, you don't own it.
If you can crack that DRM, you're a pirate in their eyes, even if it's to play the media you legally purchased.
If you have it on an external library hosted by a third party, you don't own it.
Welcome to copyright hell.

Copyright was meant to be a limited monopoly on content by the content creator. Thanks to capitalists in general and Disney in particular, it's effectively permanent ownership. And since they broke the rules there's no reason everyone shouldn't too. So pirate and redistribute everything you can.


Fun fact, 2020 was the first year in decades where previously copyrighted material entered the public domain. On January 1, 2021, items created in 1925 will enter the public domain.
 
2020-10-29 8:47:01 PM  
Oh this shiat again
 
2020-10-30 6:03:24 AM  

NeoCortex42: Schlubbe: Amazon should explain to their customers what became of free 2-day shipping with prime.

I mean, we all know it's 'because fark you', but it'd be nice to hear them admit it. I think they have perpetrated the biggest rip-off 'because of the pandemic' of anybody. We'll get it to you in a week or ten days, and you'll like it.

I altered the deal. Pray that I don't alter it further.

I'd be happy if they'd just explain the lack of decent packaging recently. Usually I end up with an item just loosely banging around inside an oversized box with zero padding or air bubbles or anything.


I do have to admit that this is one area I have never had an issue with. I am not a Prime member and I never pay for any level of expedited shipment. I always take the free or cheapest option. The order will show 4-7 days. My shipments are usually received in 2-3.
 
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