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(This Is Colossal)   A centuries-old Japanese forestry trick delivers impeccably straight and knot-free timber, and which can be harvested every 20 years without cutting the tree down   (thisiscolossal.com) divider line
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2142 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Oct 2020 at 7:08 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-28 3:46:53 PM  
That's pretty damn impressive.
 
2020-10-28 7:16:19 PM  
It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/Coppicin​g?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.
 
2020-10-28 7:50:36 PM  

greentea1985: It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/w​iki/Coppicing?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.


Hey now, we're Mericuns.  We don't have time to be organized.  Clear cut it now and complain about it afterwards.
 
2020-10-28 7:55:25 PM  

cherryl taggart: greentea1985: It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/w​iki/Coppicing?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.

Hey now, we're Mericuns.  We don't have time to be organized.  Clear cut it now and complain about it afterwards.


Something something pave paradise and put up a parking lot.
 
2020-10-28 8:15:46 PM  
Coppice. Capeesh?

People don't know this? I first learned of it from a gardening book. It is a big deal in the UK and France and has been for many centuries. You can use willow withes for all kinds of things such as fencing, lattice, even basketry. They are a very renewable resource.

Willow grows anywhere and soaks up so much water that you can use it to dry out swampy areas. Then you let it grow out a year or two. Coppice that and use the wood for mallet heads or whatever. A year later you have finger thick withes. Wait a year or two and you have tool handles. A year later, you might have pencil thick withes. You can make baskets or whatever.

Stagger your plantings and harvests and get whatever thickness you want.

In general terms, Japan has a huge forest resource. The country is heavily forested. Much of it has been done as development projects since WWII ended. Many of the forests are starting to get overgrown, and it is a problem.
 
2020-10-28 8:21:22 PM  
I'll be damned. It's fantastic but it looks crazy as hell.
 
2020-10-28 8:45:03 PM  

lindalouwho: I'll be damned. It's fantastic but it looks crazy as hell.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-28 8:58:03 PM  
last time I was in the redwoods I noticed several nearly perfect circles of trees.  I finally realized they had grown from the stumps left after the old growth trees were cut.
 
2020-10-28 9:07:15 PM  

cherryl taggart: greentea1985: It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/w​iki/Coppicing?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.

Hey now, we're Mericuns.  We don't have time to be organized.  Clear cut it now and complain about it afterwards.


Many hardwoods will grow back from the stump.  You can tell the oak forests around here that have been cut in the past because the oaks will regrow with 2 or 3 trunks, whereas a tree from an acorn will almost always have just one.
 
2020-10-28 9:10:47 PM  

2fardownthread: Willow grows anywhere and soaks up so much water that you can use it to dry out swampy areas.


Maybe they should plant it in DC.
 
2020-10-28 9:21:08 PM  

greentea1985: It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/w​iki/Coppicing?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.


Shhh don't interrupt the Weeaboos during their mating season.
 
2020-10-28 9:21:22 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: lindalouwho: I'll be damned. It's fantastic but it looks crazy as hell.

[Fark user image 512x384]


Gasp! Oh no. The horror.

People do not get it. Let me bring it down. You know that beetle that decimates trees in the US? It just destroys whole forests. I have seen it wreck Colorado over the years. It comes from Japan. Or rather it came from Japan a long long time ago.

But it still exists in Japan. The beetle just can't get a hold. It can't make a dent in most places. Humans in Japan DO cut down huge swathes of trees on a pretty regular basis and do a thorough job of it. But some other area gets replanted while everyone tries to figure out what to do with the timber and eventually the lumber. Who builds with cedar these days?

Context is important. Smoky clear cutting is a problem in many parts of the world. I get it. And we all want to hug trees and monkeys and raccoons and pigs and deer. But in some parts of the world, resources are managed properly and that demands culling and best use. I think I have five trees that just popped up in my back yard. I will cut them down and not even worry about it. Maybe I will transplant them. But where? And what do I do with the trees popping up next year?

Anyway, generally speaking, coppicing of cedar, fir, spruce and redwood would only be done commercially. It is easier to just plant them and let them go. Then you cut them down when you need them.

I think the problem is that nobody knows what husbandry is anymore. It is not a model of slaughter or extraction, but of management. Many of these wooded areas have been managed carefully for 75 years, with a different management regime before that extending back hundreds of years.
 
2020-10-28 9:41:45 PM  

2fardownthread: I think the problem is that nobody knows what husbandry is anymore. It is not a model of slaughter or extraction, but of management. Many of these wooded areas have been managed carefully for 75 years, with a different management regime before that extending back hundreds of years.


I read a few years ago that the redwood forests in the US started declining, and they realised that they had been too successful in stopping forest fires. Without a fire every now and then there was no cleared land where new young saplings could start. The entire forest was old, mature, trees and no new younger ones. They realised they had to start allowing some fires every now and then to keep the forest healthy.
 
2020-10-28 9:55:46 PM  

mrlewish: greentea1985: It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/w​iki/Coppicing?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.

Shhh don't interrupt the Weeaboos during their mating season.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-28 10:10:17 PM  

2fardownthread: I think I have five trees that just popped up in my back yard. I will cut them down and not even worry about it. Maybe I will transplant them. But where? And what do I do with the trees popping up next year?


Last house the property behind us had a huge maple tree. Turns out huge maple trees aren't very strong and drop huge branches.  But to the point, most years we'd have to pull up one to two hundred little maples that were trying to take over our garden.
 
2020-10-28 11:01:14 PM  

mrlewish: greentea1985: It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/w​iki/Coppicing?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.

Shhh don't interrupt the Weeaboos during their mating season.


You've got some punch, friend. But I must warn you, your punch may make them wobble but they won't fall down.
 
2020-10-28 11:18:20 PM  

2fardownthread: Many of the forests are starting to get overgrown, and it is a problem.


What kind of nonsense is this?
 
2020-10-28 11:43:56 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: 2fardownthread: Many of the forests are starting to get overgrown, and it is a problem.

What kind of nonsense is this?


We need to start raking them.
 
2020-10-29 12:04:05 AM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: 2fardownthread: I think the problem is that nobody knows what husbandry is anymore. It is not a model of slaughter or extraction, but of management. Many of these wooded areas have been managed carefully for 75 years, with a different management regime before that extending back hundreds of years.

I read a few years ago that the redwood forests in the US started declining, and they realised that they had been too successful in stopping forest fires. Without a fire every now and then there was no cleared land where new young saplings could start. The entire forest was old, mature, trees and no new younger ones. They realised they had to start allowing some fires every now and then to keep the forest healthy.


They got their wish!

Californians aren't too happy about it though!
 
2020-10-29 12:14:40 AM  
It's been done.

Fark user imageView Full Size

/bamboo forest
 
2020-10-29 12:21:19 AM  

natazha: 2fardownthread: I think I have five trees that just popped up in my back yard. I will cut them down and not even worry about it. Maybe I will transplant them. But where? And what do I do with the trees popping up next year?

Last house the property behind us had a huge maple tree. Turns out huge maple trees aren't very strong and drop huge branches.  But to the point, most years we'd have to pull up one to two hundred little maples that were trying to take over our garden.


Who the fark cares? That's how maples work
 
2020-10-29 2:56:31 AM  

caljar: cherryl taggart: greentea1985: It's a cool trick, but not unheard of in the west. [Coppicing](https://en.wikipedia.org/w​iki/Coppicing?wprov=sfti1) was practiced for centuries to harvest wood without killing the tree.

Hey now, we're Mericuns.  We don't have time to be organized.  Clear cut it now and complain about it afterwards.

Many hardwoods will grow back from the stump.  You can tell the oak forests around here that have been cut in the past because the oaks will regrow with 2 or 3 trunks, whereas a tree from an acorn will almost always have just one.


Tell me about it.  We dropped a white oak some time back, because it was diseased.  It was threatening two houses and the fences between them.  We are now fighting the sapling wars.  Trying to pick which one or two to allow and hacking down the rest is a pain in the back.
 
2020-10-29 6:55:55 AM  
Its like reverse bonsai
 
2020-10-29 8:32:28 AM  

HempHead: Bennie Crabtree: 2fardownthread: Many of the forests are starting to get overgrown, and it is a problem.

What kind of nonsense is this?

We need to start raking them.


I've a rake. Who'll bring the hamberders for sustenance (whatever that means)?
 
2020-10-29 9:29:59 AM  

2fardownthread: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: lindalouwho: I'll be damned. It's fantastic but it looks crazy as hell.

[Fark user image 512x384]

Gasp! Oh no. The horror.

People do not get it. Let me bring it down. You know that beetle that decimates trees in the US? It just destroys whole forests. I have seen it wreck Colorado over the years. It comes from Japan. Or rather it came from Japan a long long time ago.

But it still exists in Japan. The beetle just can't get a hold. It can't make a dent in most places. Humans in Japan DO cut down huge swathes of trees on a pretty regular basis and do a thorough job of it. But some other area gets replanted while everyone tries to figure out what to do with the timber and eventually the lumber. Who builds with cedar these days?

Context is important. Smoky clear cutting is a problem in many parts of the world. I get it. And we all want to hug trees and monkeys and raccoons and pigs and deer. But in some parts of the world, resources are managed properly and that demands culling and best use. I think I have five trees that just popped up in my back yard. I will cut them down and not even worry about it. Maybe I will transplant them. But where? And what do I do with the trees popping up next year?

Anyway, generally speaking, coppicing of cedar, fir, spruce and redwood would only be done commercially. It is easier to just plant them and let them go. Then you cut them down when you need them.

I think the problem is that nobody knows what husbandry is anymore. It is not a model of slaughter or extraction, but of management. Many of these wooded areas have been managed carefully for 75 years, with a different management regime before that extending back hundreds of years.


Who builds with cedar???

All that supposed knowledge of Japan and yet you seem to have never stepped into a Japanese bathroom, or bath house.

You ever notice how the cedar boards are crap at home depot and lowes. The US grows some great cedar though. Where do you think it goes.
 
2020-10-29 2:50:30 PM  
Too labor intensive. Far easier and cheaper to just cut and replant every 15 years.
 
2020-10-29 4:22:03 PM  

chitownmike: natazha: 2fardownthread: I think I have five trees that just popped up in my back yard. I will cut them down and not even worry about it. Maybe I will transplant them. But where? And what do I do with the trees popping up next year?

Last house the property behind us had a huge maple tree. Turns out huge maple trees aren't very strong and drop huge branches.  But to the point, most years we'd have to pull up one to two hundred little maples that were trying to take over our garden.

Who the fark cares? That's how maples work


Got a huge silver maple out back. At least nothing is under it. Silver maples get big fast and are very brittle in an ice storm.
 
2020-10-29 4:52:53 PM  

chitownmike: Who the fark cares? That's how maples work


The Maples want more sunlight, but the oaks ignore their pleas.
 
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