Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Abc.net.au)   Even the cows are scary bad asses in Australia. Slurp   (abc.net.au) divider line
    More: Weird  
•       •       •

2508 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Oct 2020 at 7:17 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-10-28 5:39:49 PM  
This is no surprise to me.

Cattle ranching is a little different in at least Western Australia, "cattle stations" out in the bush are just huge private property tracts where the herds are dumped, with maybe a couple of staff driving around to confirm that water is being pumped out of the wells for the cattle to drink from (called "boremen" for maintaining the well-bores) and to euthanize any terribly injured or diseased animals.  They're otherwise left to fend for themselves for the most part until it's time for a roundup.  Some of the cattle stations are the sizes of small european countries.  While there are some fences in some areas, it looks like the herds are mostly kept separated out of simple distance and the fixed locations of the wellsites.  Herds of different owners can't really intermix because they have no access to each other.

Given the remoteness and the harsh conditions it isn't surprising that the cattle are accustomed to eating whatever will give them nutrition even if they were originally herbivores.  The terrain looks sparse, so if the cattle have eaten all of what they would prefer, they must move on to less preferable food.
 
2020-10-28 7:26:22 PM  
That's not a cud, mate.  [pulls out snake]  Now, that's a cud!
 
2020-10-28 7:28:37 PM  
"It kind of sucked its head off back to the bone."

I remember her.
 
2020-10-28 7:42:15 PM  
I used to get buckets of restaurant scraps thrown out for the chickens. The horses liked to scavenge through those too.

I watched in horror one day as one horse pulled out and started chewing on an uneaten lamb chop. I was running through my mind how I was going to explain to the vet why my horse was choking on a chop bone, when he spat out the bone, perfectly sucked clean of any meat.

Turns out he liked banana curry too.

The other horse liked sweet potatoes, but he wasn't allowed to have any after the first time, because they made him break out in hives.
 
2020-10-28 8:15:07 PM  

TWX: This is no surprise to me.

Cattle ranching is a little different in at least Western Australia, "cattle stations" out in the bush are just huge private property tracts where the herds are dumped, with maybe a couple of staff driving around to confirm that water is being pumped out of the wells for the cattle to drink from (called "boremen" for maintaining the well-bores) and to euthanize any terribly injured or diseased animals.  They're otherwise left to fend for themselves for the most part until it's time for a roundup.  Some of the cattle stations are the sizes of small european countries.  While there are some fences in some areas, it looks like the herds are mostly kept separated out of simple distance and the fixed locations of the wellsites.  Herds of different owners can't really intermix because they have no access to each other.

Given the remoteness and the harsh conditions it isn't surprising that the cattle are accustomed to eating whatever will give them nutrition even if they were originally herbivores.  The terrain looks sparse, so if the cattle have eaten all of what they would prefer, they must move on to less preferable food.


Cattle, horses, just about any herd herbivore animal will eat meat whenever they get the opportunity.  Horses and cows love catching and eating mice out of their feeding troughs, and insects make up a big part of their diet.  They are even known to eat small birds and reptiles off of fence lines when they catch them unaware.  It's just that they are not built for taking down large prey animals, and so meat is not a major part of their diet, but it is still an important part.

On the flip side, cats, dogs, and other predators are known to munch on plants for fiber, but again, this is not a major part of their diet either.
 
2020-10-28 8:15:50 PM  
Nidiot:...I watched in horror one day as one horse pulled out and started chewing on an uneaten lamb chop. I was running through my mind how I was going to explain to the vet why my horse was choking on a chop bone, when he spat out the bone, perfectly sucked clean of any meat.

I watched somewhat horrified as a friend (very experienced with horses) feed her mare a bit of biltong... and the horse was definitely wanting more.
 
2020-10-28 8:40:23 PM  
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-28 9:29:34 PM  
Subby, ever seen a live Texas longhorn? From, oh, about 10 or 15 yards away (beyond a cattle guard)?
 
2020-10-28 9:37:36 PM  
"'Little bastiche clearly did not know who he was f*cking with,' was clearly heard as we approached."
 
2020-10-28 9:43:03 PM  
anyplace that uses helicopters to assist the horses with the roundup, yeah those cattle will eat whatever doesn't kill them
 
2020-10-28 9:46:54 PM  
Mmm grass raised, snake finished.
 
2020-10-28 10:05:15 PM  
Despite being raised in farm country (I was a townie), it was only a few years ago that I saw a video of a cow catching and eating a chicken.
 
2020-10-28 10:06:58 PM  

natazha: Despite being raised in farm country (I was a townie), it was only a few years ago that I saw a video of a cow catching and eating a chicken.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-28 10:21:03 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-29 12:07:33 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-29 2:04:15 AM  
Ah: Outback Snake Cows.
 
2020-10-29 11:05:13 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
Displayed 17 of 17 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.