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(EurekAlert)   "More than half of American adults with advanced MS report mistreatment by caregivers." And then it gets worse. Burn it down, covid. Burn it all down   (eurekalert.org) divider line
    More: Sick  
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384 clicks; posted to STEM » on 28 Oct 2020 at 2:13 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-28 2:18:44 PM  
2.3 million affected and they asked 206 people.
 
2020-10-28 2:24:39 PM  
Well that's depressing.
 
2020-10-28 2:31:19 PM  

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: 2.3 million affected and they asked 206 people.


So you're saying the data is shaky?
 
2020-10-28 2:40:21 PM  
LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.
 
2020-10-28 2:57:14 PM  

FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.


A true judgment of a 'modern' society is how those workers are paid.

Same goes for teachers.
 
2020-10-28 2:57:44 PM  
As long as the sampling was random, then n>30 can return a testable distribution against the h0 that less than half have experienced abuse.

/but bigger is generally better
 
2020-10-28 3:00:28 PM  

FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.


America does have the tendency to treat healthcare workers like complete shiat, making it so that even the people who are cut out for it are overworked, underpaid, and miserable. And that's when they're actually paid, and not a family member forced to act because our social services are complete shiat.
Like most things in America, it doesn't have to be this way, but the shareholders wouldn't make as much money if people were treated like human beings.
 
2020-10-28 3:04:41 PM  
Automate and end jobs. UBI. When people don't have to figure out how to support themselves; to keep up with current events and political corruption; take care of children, parents, and sick relatives; and do it all without sleep, the world will be a better place. Let the computers and robots do the jobs while we all live real life.
 
2020-10-28 3:09:16 PM  

Sophont: FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.

America does have the tendency to treat healthcare workers like complete shiat, making it so that even the people who are cut out for it are overworked, underpaid, and miserable. And that's when they're actually paid, and not a family member forced to act because our social services are complete shiat.
Like most things in America, it doesn't have to be this way, but the shareholders wouldn't make as much money if people were treated like human beings.


"United Way: because you should donate instead of the wealthy paying taxes."
 
2020-10-28 3:13:25 PM  

KB202: Automate and end jobs. UBI. When people don't have to figure out how to support themselves; to keep up with current events and political corruption; take care of children, parents, and sick relatives; and do it all without sleep, the world will be a better place. Let the computers and robots do the jobs while we all live real life.


"Programmed by fellows with compassion and vision. We'll be clean when their work is done. We'll be eternally free and eternally young, yeah." -- IGY, Donald Fagen
 
2020-10-28 3:38:01 PM  

FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.


I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.

A true judgment of a 'modern' society is how those workers are paid.

Same goes for teachers.


I'll address both of these. I work (mostly)in long term care. Not so much MS. More Alzheimer's/dementia. Long term critical care in any case. We get paid pretty well. I also work in a private facility, so it's not cheap.There is no one I know at work that doesn't do the best they can for our residents. I mean that. You are right in the sense that it takes a different kind of person to deal and cope with it. It's not for everyone. I had two ladies pass away last week. I washed the bodies and had them presentable for the family to see. It does go across all cultures. You take care of your family. I don't work in a hospital. No-one is getting better. So we do the best we can to make it better. I deal with this shiat every farking day. Some days are hard, yet someone has to do it. They deserve it.
 
2020-10-28 3:54:55 PM  
I'll add one thing...sometimes you have to be forceful. Last night, a new gentleman was admitted. Around 5am I go to change his pad(diaper(he's incontinent)). Soon as I touch his leg to help roll him over . H e SCREAMED and said "MY LEG'S ARE BROKEN!"  They obviously are not, and if they were casts would be on and it'd be in report. Yet his pad is full of shiat.  It's got to be changed. Took 3 of us. one on arms, one on legs, one getting the job done.  It wasn't too violent(it was hard though, he's pretty strong apparantly). It could have been though. Especially without 2 restraining him.One could say it was abuse, I would say leaving him in his own excrement would have been worse.  It's not always black and white.Note: gentleman was not injured even bruised. He needed to be restrained to have the pad change. What do you think would happen if Licensing came in the next day and found him covered in shiat.   We practice "Do no harm, but stay on the side of what''s best for the resident" Even if they don't like it. They have dementia. We try and make the best decisions at the time.
 
2020-10-28 3:55:12 PM  
When my MIL had dementia, she accused me of mistreating her. Fortunately, my wife knew otherwise, so it did not become a problem. I know that old people are mistreated all the time but I also know their brains don't always work right, so be careful what you believe.
 
2020-10-28 4:16:36 PM  

Aviron: FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.

A true judgment of a 'modern' society is how those workers are paid.

Same goes for teachers.

I'll address both of these. I work (mostly)in long term care. Not so much MS. More Alzheimer's/dementia. Long term critical care in any case. We get paid pretty well. I also work in a private facility, so it's not cheap.There is no one I know at work that doesn't do the best they can for our residents. I mean that. You are right in the sense that it takes a different kind of person to deal and cope with it. It's not for everyone. I had two ladies pass away last week. I washed the bodies and had them presentable for the family to see. It does go across all cultures. You take care of your family. I don't work in a hospital. No-one is getting better. So we do the best we can to make it better. I deal with this shiat every farking day. Some days are hard, yet someone has to do it. They deserve it.


I work for an agency that does group homes for the disabled. It's atrocious, the level of neglect and indifference I see from other staff on a daily basis. So many of them treat it like a paycheck, and slack off on their phones while ignoring the residents. A room call button goes off, and I'm consistently the only staff who goes to check. Twice it was because someone was on the floor after a fall and bleeding from the head. I reported people multiple times for neglect, some of whom got fired over it. But they keep hiring the kind of people who just don't care, and it's maddening.
 
2020-10-28 8:55:57 PM  

KB202: Automate and end jobs. UBI. When people don't have to figure out how to support themselves; to keep up with current events and political corruption; take care of children, parents, and sick relatives; and do it all without sleep, the world will be a better place. Let the computers and robots do the jobs while we all live real life.


But...but how can we live a real live if we don't spend 3/4 of it busting our ass for someone else?!?
 
2020-10-29 12:54:41 AM  

Herr Morgenstern: Aviron: FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: FLMountainMan: LOL at the notion that is somehow a uniquely American problem.  Sick people are a drain.  It's a moral necessity (in my opinion) to care for them, but it is exhausting.  Some people aren't cut out for it.  I think you would find this cuts across all cultures.

A true judgment of a 'modern' society is how those workers are paid.

Same goes for teachers.

I'll address both of these. I work (mostly)in long term care. Not so much MS. More Alzheimer's/dementia. Long term critical care in any case. We get paid pretty well. I also work in a private facility, so it's not cheap.There is no one I know at work that doesn't do the best they can for our residents. I mean that. You are right in the sense that it takes a different kind of person to deal and cope with it. It's not for everyone. I had two ladies pass away last week. I washed the bodies and had them presentable for the family to see. It does go across all cultures. You take care of your family. I don't work in a hospital. No-one is getting better. So we do the best we can to make it better. I deal with this shiat every farking day. Some days are hard, yet someone has to do it. They deserve it.

I work for an agency that does group homes for the disabled. It's atrocious, the level of neglect and indifference I see from other staff on a daily basis. So many of them treat it like a paycheck, and slack off on their phones while ignoring the residents. A room call button goes off, and I'm consistently the only staff who goes to check. Twice it was because someone was on the floor after a fall and bleeding from the head. I reported people multiple times for neglect, some of whom got fire ...


You know what's truly frightening... I'm having a relapse right now... not exactly sure what I have, but the symptoms are like parkinsons or huntingtons in nature.  It's progressive and my outlook so far is, yep, you're in trouble.  It's scary and I'm considering what I'm going to do, it already feels like, fark me, I live alone.

Thing is, I've fought harder than anyone I've ever met.  I've remained functional, held down a very stressful career and lived on my own for ten years now.   I exercise every day, I take care of myself, sometimes I climb mountains.

I'm just at the point where I feel like I probably need some help from my friends/family once in a while.  If nothing else, for someone to make sure I'm okay once in a while and haven't fallen and gotten hurt or something.  I can take care of myself most of the time, just sometimes things don't work.  Not asking for anyone to wipe my ass here, just help out a bit.

Honestly, after talking to my family and friends, I find it incredibly disturbing.  I had a good friend who wants to put me in a long term care facility.  My mother freaks out.  I'm just shocked, because this isn't that much different than your neighbor with a broken leg who needs someone to carry the groceries every now and then.  I just want to live in a house with other people because it would be a safer, more comfortable situation, not that I need twenty four hour care or something.

Really depressing how people treat each other.
 
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