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(WIBC Indianapolis)   New 'super-white' paint that reflects 95.5 percent of sunlight off buildings is so good at reducing heat it could one day replace air conditioning. Subby would like to have them test this in Houston during the month of August   (wibc.com) divider line
    More: Unlikely  
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1093 clicks; posted to STEM » on 24 Oct 2020 at 9:30 PM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-24 9:40:50 PM  
12 votes:
Successfully fighting climate change really will take an "all of the above" strategy.
 
2020-10-24 9:01:36 PM  
11 votes:
The difference is in the paint's recipe: it's filler is calcium carbonate, a compound found in rocks and seashells.

FTFA

Sounds like a whitewash to me.
 
2020-10-24 8:56:41 PM  
8 votes:
Unfortunately I have to close my eyes and feel around for the door handle to insert the key in. Long ago, my eyes fried outta my head when I took a good look at my place at the wrong time of day.
 
2020-10-24 9:49:50 PM  
7 votes:
In Houston?  Unless it's impervious to mildew and dirt, it won't be reflective long.
 
2020-10-24 9:10:55 PM  
7 votes:

Fingerware Error: The difference is in the paint's recipe: it's filler is calcium carbonate, a compound found in rocks and seashells.

FTFA

Sounds like a whitewash to me.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-25 12:50:03 AM  
6 votes:

redbucket: So a mirror?


No, diffuse vs specular reflection. Diffuse means the rays scatter in all directions. Specular means they only reflect in one direction so an image can form. Mirrors also don't reflect that much total light. Some gets trapped in the mirror due to total internal reflection.
 
2020-10-25 12:11:24 AM  
6 votes:
Painting your house or apartment building white, especially if your building has a shallow sloped roof or a flat one, has been a thing in basic architectural design since the 1970s, subby.

Well, correction, technically it's "been a thing" since prehistory, as that's one of the reasons adobe was so popular in desert regions in both the americas and the Mediterranean for millennia, but I mean making a standard practice of adding white to non-white buildings to save on AC specifically.

The new material is pretty cool (heh) but TFA is doing that pop science article thing where they misunderstand what a new development is and instead write an article on the premise that the entire field was only just invented.

// An individual house still has to deal with the convection component, so you'll still need AC, but larger experiments with white roofing have actually demonstrated that with enough whitewash you can quite literally drop the outside temperature of a city block by five degrees relative to the blocks around it during hot summer days.
 
2020-10-24 9:48:41 PM  
4 votes:
So a mirror?
 
2020-10-25 12:09:31 PM  
3 votes:

Target Builder: In infrared it looks like this:
[buildingscience.com image 225x300]

Yup. They built an 80 story heat exchange in the middle of a city noted for cold winters.

But because of how building energy sustainability scoring was written at the time, focusing on avoiding heat gain, it scored very well. The rules have since been changed.


Everything about that building, from an energy perspective, is a huge lesson in what not to do.
I'm an architect with a specialization in building envelope science, practicing in an even colder climate than Chicago. If you want lessons on how to reduce energy costs in buildings, look up north - we've been the experts for 50 years - and this white paint stuff is nonsense.
 
2020-10-24 9:58:58 PM  
3 votes:

greatgodyoshi: No air conditioning in Florida? You'd still have to fit houses with dehumidifiers, otherwise enjoy your mold.


You'd still have ambient temperatures to still deal with getting through the windows and insulation.  AC won't be going any where.  You just wouldn't need as much.
 
2020-10-24 9:52:47 PM  
3 votes:
No air conditioning in Florida? You'd still have to fit houses with dehumidifiers, otherwise enjoy your mold.
 
2020-10-25 1:38:19 PM  
2 votes:
The future's so bright we'll have to wear shades.

/ Investing in sunglasses tomorrow.
 
2020-10-25 1:36:39 PM  
2 votes:

johnphantom: Could you imagine trying to navigate a city of buildings painted like this in the middle of a clear day?

No thanks.


There's a reason the buildings on the Mediterranean coast are pastels. When they painted them white, it damn' near blinded people looking at them from boats.
 
2020-10-25 12:05:39 PM  
2 votes:
They used something similar on this building to minimize solar gain and provide solar shading. In Chicago...

upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size


Then after the built it people noticed that "keeping a building cool" is NOT a pressing issue in Chicago for most months of the year.

In infrared it looks like this:
buildingscience.comView Full Size


Yup. They built an 80 story heat exchange in the middle of a city noted for cold winters.

But because of how building energy sustainability scoring was written at the time, focusing on avoiding heat gain, it scored very well. The rules have since been changed.
 
2020-10-25 9:21:54 AM  
2 votes:
solar gains are only part of the heat gains of a structure.
 
2020-10-24 9:57:05 PM  
2 votes:
Available soon to buy for anyone who is not Anish Kapoor.
 
2020-10-26 12:55:14 AM  
1 vote:
It takes more energy to heat interior spaces in the United States each winter than it takes to cool the interior spaces in the summer.  You want buildings to warm up from solar radiation in the winter. So unless you are willing to paint the building twice a year, you will lose more total energy than you gain.
 
2020-10-25 11:10:20 PM  
1 vote:
I write a proposal about this exact thing when I was in The Air Force. For some reason all the doors and trim on our base was dark chocolate brown.

In the summer in Texas, the doors were so hot, you needed gloves to touch them. Inside, the doors radiated doors much heat, you had to run the AC on high.

I calculated the base could save $150,000 a year by painting the doors beige.

They didn't care.
 
2020-10-25 8:31:21 PM  
1 vote:

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: Naritai: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: solar gains are only part of the heat gains of a structure.

Do you have info on this? Genuinely asking.

Regardless of how well you insulate your house, the inside temp will eventually rise to the outside temperature without heat or ac.  Greater insulation just increases the time it takes.  Then you have basic infiltration of outside air.  This paint does nothing in regards to that.


plus theres that funny way that sunlight goes right through these things called windows and then gets absorbed and converted to heat by all the furniture, floors, etc inside the offices.  no matter what color you paint anything else unless you paint right across the windows a huge amount of your buildings surface is still going to let light in.
 
2020-10-25 9:00:10 AM  
1 vote:
Could you imagine trying to navigate a city of buildings painted like this in the middle of a clear day?

No thanks.
 
2020-10-24 10:54:39 PM  
1 vote:
Mirrors work also.. and reflected 100% of the sunlight
 
2020-10-24 10:18:36 PM  
1 vote:
"Yet across the gulf of space, minds that are to our minds as ours are to those of the beasts that perish, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes, and slowly and surely drew their plans against us."

 
2020-10-24 9:50:36 PM  
1 vote:
Wouldn't having walls which are cooler than the surrounding air cause condensation? Potentially useful outside, but indoors might cause problems.
 
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