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(MovieWeb)   Chris Hemsworth's photo of the first script-reading meeting with director Taika Waititi for the movie Thor: Love and Thunder is pretty much what you'd expect   (movieweb.com) divider line
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5097 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 24 Oct 2020 at 4:25 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-24 1:56:23 PM  
She becomes Thor while receiving treatment for breast cancer, with the power of Thor's hammer, Mjölnir, both restoring her strength and stopping her cancer treatment from working, putting Jane in an impossible situation.

Wow, that sounds like fun.
 
2020-10-24 2:01:12 PM  
Do the make-up people know the proper use of a French braid?  Likely not, seeing where they put one.
 
2020-10-24 2:08:38 PM  

Mugato: She becomes Thor while receiving treatment for breast cancer, with the power of Thor's hammer, Mjölnir, both restoring her strength and stopping her cancer treatment from working, putting Jane in an impossible situation.

Wow, that sounds like fun.


Yeah...Thor has moved away from dark and serious to just being fun. I don't see them changing that formula
 
2020-10-24 2:10:39 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


*Checks*

Oh. :/
 
2020-10-24 2:37:42 PM  
i.ytimg.comView Full Size


"Is it, though?"
 
2020-10-24 4:13:51 PM  

koder: [Fark user image 850x465]

*Checks*

Oh. :/


Is that a wombat? (I'm asking about the four-legged hairy animal, not Chris Hemsworth).
 
2020-10-24 4:36:08 PM  
If anyone can make Portman seem like she's actually a person rather than an animatronic, it Waititi.
 
2020-10-24 4:44:08 PM  
I don't know anything about comic Thor or what Jane Foster was like or did in the comics, but I do know that Tessa Thompson is about 1000 times more interesting than Natalie Portman and should be Thor.

I feel like Comic Book Guy with less knowledge.
 
2020-10-24 4:44:55 PM  

Mugato: She becomes Thor while receiving treatment for breast cancer, with the power of Thor's hammer, Mjölnir, both restoring her strength and stopping her cancer treatment from working, putting Jane in an impossible situation.

Wow, that sounds like fun.


The Thor sub-franchise has not been one of the ones that actually sticks religiously to the comics in the literal sense of plot-lines, I would not expect them to start now.  Especially since Ragnarok didn't have more than the occasional vague bits and pieces of a dozen different random comics (not even Thor comics) and was by far the most successful and "spiritually truest" adaptation yet.

Especially in the case of Jane Foster -- MCU Jane Foster is a massively different character than comics Jane Foster.  Like... in the comics she's a doctor (originally a nurse who worked under the original Thor when he was a doctor, which is where it came from and why the movie version isn't, Thor's origin being different), and a really, really heroic one who primarily oversees and executes her city's emergency medical response.  And the job is central to her character because she's a character whose job is central to her life.

So based on the fact that in the MCU she's a wimpy damsel who is also the world's worst physics grad student, and has never actually show any compassion for others or common sense, much less heroic devotion to human welfare at her own expense, the path to her picking up the hammer's gonna have to be a lot different just because there's a loooooot more ground to cover to get her into the 'worthy' category to begin with.

My money's still on some magical shenaniganry that makes a buncha Thors (Throg, Beta Rey Bill, etc) more or less at random and Foster not knowing why she was picked and having to grow into the role with some sorta on-screen character arc, but I'm not a soulless Disney robot so who knows.
 
2020-10-24 4:47:24 PM  

Mugato: She becomes Thor while receiving treatment for breast cancer, with the power of Thor's hammer, Mjölnir, both restoring her strength and stopping her cancer treatment from working, putting Jane in an impossible situation.

Wow, that sounds like fun.


Sounds like a chick flick.
 
2020-10-24 4:48:12 PM  

Mugato: She becomes Thor while receiving treatment for breast cancer, with the power of Thor's hammer, Mjölnir, both restoring her strength and stopping her cancer treatment from working, putting Jane in an impossible situation.

Wow, that sounds like fun.


It always seemed weird to me that Jane Foster becomes "Thor" instead of just becoming "The God(des) of Thunder".  It would be like if Dick Grayson put on the batsuit and became "Bruce Wayne".
 
2020-10-24 5:23:17 PM  

browneye: koder: [Fark user image 850x465]

*Checks*

Oh. :/

Is that a wombat? (I'm asking about the four-legged hairy animal, not Chris Hemsworth).


It's a quokka
 
2020-10-24 5:23:27 PM  

NeoCortex42: It always seemed weird to me that Jane Foster becomes "Thor" instead of just becoming "The God(des) of Thunder".  It would be like if Dick Grayson put on the batsuit and became "Bruce Wayne".


It's because the comics are comics, and have their own internal mythology separate from Norse mythology.

Thor comics aren't a modern re-interpretation of the Eddas and preceding myths, they're a distant sequel to the Eddas, possibly minus Ragnarok and possibly including it depending who's writing that day.

The comic opens with Odin playing what is, in fairness, a pretty in-character and classic mythological Odin prank on Thor, a prank that's like 10% moral lesson, 40% for the lulz and 50% Odin being arbitrarily cruel like most trickster gods in every religion tend to be: he took Thor's divine nature and sealed it in Mjolnir (which according to the myths is basically completely unbreakable so good luck ever getting that shiat back), tossed a curse on said hammer decreeing in very vague terms that he could only have access to it when he's both in possession of the hammer and "behaving well", and then chucking both down to Earth in different places.

Forty years of plot development happened between then and the Jane Foster empowerment, and basically every time the writers ran out of ideas they'd go back to the well of that original curse and have it go wrong (or, arguably, right) in some absurdly dramatic way made all the weirder by magic in the Thor books actually working similarly to magic in classical european folklore (so, y'know, really farking arbitrarily and sometimes with utterly absolute power, e.g. Circe is around and turns men into pigs etc.)

The most common way for things to go wrong is for Thor to lose the hammer, since his 'divine half' is in the hammer rather than him and without it he's at best a mildly supernatural beefy dude.  This was how writers would force Thor to deal with shiat without his actual straight-up magic, and usually that was the end of it, but over time storylines where things went really wrong began to crop up and produce other people getting their hands on the hammer who met the poorly-defined behavioral key and had the right attitude and would become a regular mortal capable of actually using the divine half of Thor that's permanently in the hammer now.  In many cases, this even stuck -- the frog who 'became thor' for a bit is actually permanently a thing in the setting now.

Further plot developments (most attempts to, y'know, undo Odin's dickish curse once basically every god and magician in the setting realized how many more problems it caused than solved) were... technically successful, but as usual for the series not actually what was intended: Thor basically has earned his way back to independent godhood with time, help, work, and loads of magical bullshiat, and, like... re-divined himself to where he's still a god without the hammer, but the hammer still has Thor's original divine soul in it,and in fact the various attempts to hack the damned thing back to its original state have tweaked it to make it much easier for new mortals to pick the damned thing up and cause new problems.

Jane Foster was sort of a political solution to this issue for Asgard: Thor has been separating himself from the hammer and getting new powers (and actually took a new god-name for a bit, "Odinson"), and the more he recovers and separates the more easily the hammer allows new "hosts"... and any mortal who hasn't mugged an old lady and kicked a puppy recently picking it up gets spliced with the literal storm-powered soul of OG Thor, which is obviously not super great for the other gods and all of their very breakable mortal servants, delicate china, etc.

Foster needed a power-up for various reasons (in-universe), she was someone Asgard basically trusted, she was pretty heroic in her own right so she wouldn't be using the power to topple kingdoms or whatever, and she was known to be personally compatible with the Thor-soul because she'd worked with him and dated him at various points.  Being way to genre savvy after half a century of disasters to think just locking the thing in the vault would last longer than a week, the court gave Foster the hammer and the job of "being Thor" as much to keep it out of other hands as because they needed to fill the Thor-shaped hole in their pantheon.

So... yeah, she's not just Jane Foster with lightning-god powers shaped by her own personality, she's literally imbued with a shard of Thor's soul, specifically the portion of that soul that defined him as Thor prior to the start of the comic book (that being the point of the joke/punishment in the first place, to deprive him of what defined him as Thor).

... and now you know why you shouldn't ask for comic book shiat in a comics nerd thread.  There probably is an explanation and it's just so absurdly convoluted that even the shortest summary is a goddamned amateur novella.
 
2020-10-24 6:13:57 PM  

Jim_Callahan: NeoCortex42: It always seemed weird to me that Jane Foster becomes "Thor" instead of just becoming "The God(des) of Thunder".  It would be like if Dick Grayson put on the batsuit and became "Bruce Wayne".

It's because the comics are comics, and have their own internal mythology separate from Norse mythology.

Thor comics aren't a modern re-interpretation of the Eddas and preceding myths, they're a distant sequel to the Eddas, possibly minus Ragnarok and possibly including it depending who's writing that day.

The comic opens with Odin playing what is, in fairness, a pretty in-character and classic mythological Odin prank on Thor, a prank that's like 10% moral lesson, 40% for the lulz and 50% Odin being arbitrarily cruel like most trickster gods in every religion tend to be: he took Thor's divine nature and sealed it in Mjolnir (which according to the myths is basically completely unbreakable so good luck ever getting that shiat back), tossed a curse on said hammer decreeing in very vague terms that he could only have access to it when he's both in possession of the hammer and "behaving well", and then chucking both down to Earth in different places.

Forty years of plot development happened between then and the Jane Foster empowerment, and basically every time the writers ran out of ideas they'd go back to the well of that original curse and have it go wrong (or, arguably, right) in some absurdly dramatic way made all the weirder by magic in the Thor books actually working similarly to magic in classical european folklore (so, y'know, really farking arbitrarily and sometimes with utterly absolute power, e.g. Circe is around and turns men into pigs etc.)

The most common way for things to go wrong is for Thor to lose the hammer, since his 'divine half' is in the hammer rather than him and without it he's at best a mildly supernatural beefy dude.  This was how writers would force Thor to deal with shiat without his actual straight-up magic, and usually that was the e ...


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 6:16:58 PM  

Jim_Callahan: NeoCortex42: It always seemed weird to me that Jane Foster becomes "Thor" instead of just becoming "The God(des) of Thunder".  It would be like if Dick Grayson put on the batsuit and became "Bruce Wayne".

It's because the comics are comics, and have their own internal mythology separate from Norse mythology.

Thor comics aren't a modern re-interpretation of the Eddas and preceding myths, they're a distant sequel to the Eddas, possibly minus Ragnarok and possibly including it depending who's writing that day.

The comic opens with Odin playing what is, in fairness, a pretty in-character and classic mythological Odin prank on Thor, a prank that's like 10% moral lesson, 40% for the lulz and 50% Odin being arbitrarily cruel like most trickster gods in every religion tend to be: he took Thor's divine nature and sealed it in Mjolnir (which according to the myths is basically completely unbreakable so good luck ever getting that shiat back), tossed a curse on said hammer decreeing in very vague terms that he could only have access to it when he's both in possession of the hammer and "behaving well", and then chucking both down to Earth in different places.

Forty years of plot development happened between then and the Jane Foster empowerment, and basically every time the writers ran out of ideas they'd go back to the well of that original curse and have it go wrong (or, arguably, right) in some absurdly dramatic way made all the weirder by magic in the Thor books actually working similarly to magic in classical european folklore (so, y'know, really farking arbitrarily and sometimes with utterly absolute power, e.g. Circe is around and turns men into pigs etc.)

The most common way for things to go wrong is for Thor to lose the hammer, since his 'divine half' is in the hammer rather than him and without it he's at best a mildly supernatural beefy dude.  This was how writers would force Thor to deal with shiat without his actual straight-up magic, and usually that was the end of it, but over time storylines where things went really wrong began to crop up and produce other people getting their hands on the hammer who met the poorly-defined behavioral key and had the right attitude and would become a regular mortal capable of actually using the divine half of Thor that's permanently in the hammer now.  In many cases, this even stuck -- the frog who 'became thor' for a bit is actually permanently a thing in the setting now.

Further plot developments (most attempts to, y'know, undo Odin's dickish curse once basically every god and magician in the setting realized how many more problems it caused than solved) were... technically successful, but as usual for the series not actually what was intended: Thor basically has earned his way back to independent godhood with time, help, work, and loads of magical bullshiat, and, like... re-divined himself to where he's still a god without the hammer, but the hammer still has Thor's original divine soul in it,and in fact the various attempts to hack the damned thing back to its original state have tweaked it to make it much easier for new mortals to pick the damned thing up and cause new problems.

Jane Foster was sort of a political solution to this issue for Asgard: Thor has been separating himself from the hammer and getting new powers (and actually took a new god-name for a bit, "Odinson"), and the more he recovers and separates the more easily the hammer allows new "hosts"... and any mortal who hasn't mugged an old lady and kicked a puppy recently picking it up gets spliced with the literal storm-powered soul of OG Thor, which is obviously not super great for the other gods and all of their very breakable mortal servants, delicate china, etc.

Foster needed a power-up for various reasons (in-universe), she was someone Asgard basically trusted, she was pretty heroic in her own right so she wouldn't be using the power to topple kingdoms or whatever, and she was known to be personally compatible with the Thor-soul because she'd worked with him and dated him at various points.  Being way to genre savvy after half a century of disasters to think just locking the thing in the vault would last longer than a week, the court gave Foster the hammer and the job of "being Thor" as much to keep it out of other hands as because they needed to fill the Thor-shaped hole in their pantheon.

So... yeah, she's not just Jane Foster with lightning-god powers shaped by her own personality, she's literally imbued with a shard of Thor's soul, specifically the portion of that soul that defined him as Thor prior to the start of the comic book (that being the point of the joke/punishment in the first place, to deprive him of what defined him as Thor).

... and now you know why you shouldn't ask for comic book shiat in a comics nerd thread.  There probably is an explanation and it's just so absurdly convoluted that even the shortest summary is a goddamned amateur novella.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 6:53:18 PM  

NOLAhd: I don't know anything about comic Thor or what Jane Foster was like or did in the comics, but I do know that Tessa Thompson is about 1000 times more interesting than Natalie Portman and should be Thor.


I would be happy to spend a disappointing two minutes making both Ms Portman and Ms Thompson Thor.

//Sorry I couldnt let that go
 
2020-10-24 8:26:56 PM  

browneye: koder: [Fark user image 850x465]

*Checks*

Oh. :/

Is that a wombat? (I'm asking about the four-legged hairy animal, not Chris Hemsworth).


No wombats a small heavy chunky animals.. if you tried to kick it, you'd hurt your foot more than hurting the wombat.

dpipwe.tas.gov.auView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 9:08:26 PM  

Wendigogo: browneye: koder: [Fark user image 850x465]

*Checks*

Oh. :/

Is that a wombat? (I'm asking about the four-legged hairy animal, not Chris Hemsworth).

It's a quokka


A third of fozzie bear?
 
2020-10-24 9:12:00 PM  

hoodiowithtudio: Wendigogo: browneye: koder: [Fark user image 850x465]

*Checks*

Oh. :/

Is that a wombat? (I'm asking about the four-legged hairy animal, not Chris Hemsworth).

It's a quokka

A third of fozzie bear?


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 9:15:12 PM  
Reaaaaaally doubt that even Watiki will be able to do anything that'll make Portman perform without her contempt for the material hanging like a dark cloud smothering any scene she's in.
It's just the way she is when the work is "beneath" her very artistic sensibilities. I'm not gonna pay for anything she's in.
 
2020-10-24 9:16:01 PM  
Good thing this talentless unfunny fark has these shiatty comicbook movies to fall back on.
 
2020-10-24 9:31:27 PM  

Wendigogo: browneye: koder: [Fark user image 850x465]

*Checks*

Oh. :/

Is that a wombat? (I'm asking about the four-legged hairy animal, not Chris Hemsworth).

It's a quokka


Its a farking Pokemon is what that is.
Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 9:42:35 PM  

ng2810: Wendigogo: browneye: koder: [Fark user image 850x465]

*Checks*

Oh. :/

Is that a wombat? (I'm asking about the four-legged hairy animal, not Chris Hemsworth).

It's a quokka

Its a farking Pokemon is what that is. [Fark user image image 425x225]
[Fark user image image 425x425]


Is it any wonder that people seek them out for selfies? They're so cute.
 
2020-10-24 10:22:45 PM  

Jim_Callahan: NeoCortex42: It always seemed weird to me that Jane Foster becomes "Thor" instead of just becoming "The God(des) of Thunder".  It would be like if Dick Grayson put on the batsuit and became "Bruce Wayne".

It's because the comics are comics, and have their own internal mythology separate from Norse mythology.

Thor comics aren't a modern re-interpretation of the Eddas and preceding myths, they're a distant sequel to the Eddas, possibly minus Ragnarok and possibly including it depending who's writing that day.

The comic opens with Odin playing what is, in fairness, a pretty in-character and classic mythological Odin prank on Thor, a prank that's like 10% moral lesson, 40% for the lulz and 50% Odin being arbitrarily cruel like most trickster gods in every religion tend to be: he took Thor's divine nature and sealed it in Mjolnir (which according to the myths is basically completely unbreakable so good luck ever getting that shiat back), tossed a curse on said hammer decreeing in very vague terms that he could only have access to it when he's both in possession of the hammer and "behaving well", and then chucking both down to Earth in different places.

Forty years of plot development happened between then and the Jane Foster empowerment, and basically every time the writers ran out of ideas they'd go back to the well of that original curse and have it go wrong (or, arguably, right) in some absurdly dramatic way made all the weirder by magic in the Thor books actually working similarly to magic in classical european folklore (so, y'know, really farking arbitrarily and sometimes with utterly absolute power, e.g. Circe is around and turns men into pigs etc.)

The most common way for things to go wrong is for Thor to lose the hammer, since his 'divine half' is in the hammer rather than him and without it he's at best a mildly supernatural beefy dude.  This was how writers would force Thor to deal with shiat without his actual straight-up magic, and usually that was the e ...


Thanks for the explanation. Having never read any of the Thor comics, I never got Jane Foster being Thor. I thought the hammer was just a tool/iconic item/badge of office, like a divine magic Captain America's shield. From this, it sounds like the hammer is somewhere between that and the Venom symbiote, and Jane being Thor makes total sense.
 
2020-10-24 10:27:54 PM  

Jim_Callahan: NeoCortex42: It always seemed weird to me that Jane Foster becomes "Thor" instead of just becoming "The God(des) of Thunder".  It would be like if Dick Grayson put on the batsuit and became "Bruce Wayne".

It's because the comics are comics, and have their own internal mythology separate from Norse mythology.

Thor comics aren't a modern re-interpretation of the Eddas and preceding myths, they're a distant sequel to the Eddas, possibly minus Ragnarok and possibly including it depending who's writing that day.

The comic opens with Odin playing what is, in fairness, a pretty in-character and classic mythological Odin prank on Thor, a prank that's like 10% moral lesson, 40% for the lulz and 50% Odin being arbitrarily cruel like most trickster gods in every religion tend to be: he took Thor's divine nature and sealed it in Mjolnir (which according to the myths is basically completely unbreakable so good luck ever getting that shiat back), tossed a curse on said hammer decreeing in very vague terms that he could only have access to it when he's both in possession of the hammer and "behaving well", and then chucking both down to Earth in different places.

Forty years of plot development happened between then and the Jane Foster empowerment, and basically every time the writers ran out of ideas they'd go back to the well of that original curse and have it go wrong (or, arguably, right) in some absurdly dramatic way made all the weirder by magic in the Thor books actually working similarly to magic in classical european folklore (so, y'know, really farking arbitrarily and sometimes with utterly absolute power, e.g. Circe is around and turns men into pigs etc.)

The most common way for things to go wrong is for Thor to lose the hammer, since his 'divine half' is in the hammer rather than him and without it he's at best a mildly supernatural beefy dude.  This was how writers would force Thor to deal with shiat without his actual straight-up magic, and usually that was the end of it, but over time storylines where things went really wrong began to crop up and produce other people getting their hands on the hammer who met the poorly-defined behavioral key and had the right attitude and would become a regular mortal capable of actually using the divine half of Thor that's permanently in the hammer now.  In many cases, this even stuck -- the frog who 'became thor' for a bit is actually permanently a thing in the setting now.

Further plot developments (most attempts to, y'know, undo Odin's dickish curse once basically every god and magician in the setting realized how many more problems it caused than solved) were... technically successful, but as usual for the series not actually what was intended: Thor basically has earned his way back to independent godhood with time, help, work, and loads of magical bullshiat, and, like... re-divined himself to where he's still a god without the hammer, but the hammer still has Thor's original divine soul in it,and in fact the various attempts to hack the damned thing back to its original state have tweaked it to make it much easier for new mortals to pick the damned thing up and cause new problems.

Jane Foster was sort of a political solution to this issue for Asgard: Thor has been separating himself from the hammer and getting new powers (and actually took a new god-name for a bit, "Odinson"), and the more he recovers and separates the more easily the hammer allows new "hosts"... and any mortal who hasn't mugged an old lady and kicked a puppy recently picking it up gets spliced with the literal storm-powered soul of OG Thor, which is obviously not super great for the other gods and all of their very breakable mortal servants, delicate china, etc.

Foster needed a power-up for various reasons (in-universe), she was someone Asgard basically trusted, she was pretty heroic in her own right so she wouldn't be using the power to topple kingdoms or whatever, and she was known to be personally compatible with the Thor-soul because she'd worked with him and dated him at various points.  Being way to genre savvy after half a century of disasters to think just locking the thing in the vault would last longer than a week, the court gave Foster the hammer and the job of "being Thor" as much to keep it out of other hands as because they needed to fill the Thor-shaped hole in their pantheon.

So... yeah, she's not just Jane Foster with lightning-god powers shaped by her own personality, she's literally imbued with a shard of Thor's soul, specifically the portion of that soul that defined him as Thor prior to the start of the comic book (that being the point of the joke/punishment in the first place, to deprive him of what defined him as Thor).

... and now you know why you shouldn't ask for comic book shiat in a comics nerd thread.  There probably is an explanation and it's just so absurdly convoluted that even the shortest summary is a goddamned amateur novella.


Also in issue 4 Thor tells Jane, who at the time he didn't know was Jane, that she needs a name for people to call her so why not call herself  Thor since he was going through some things and didn't plan on Thoring.
 
2020-10-25 1:17:42 AM  

Old Man Winter: If anyone can make Portman seem like she's actually a person rather than an animatronic, it Waititi.


The Wachowskis got a pretty decent performance out of her in V for Vendetta.
 
2020-10-25 10:57:17 AM  

TheMarchHare: Also in issue 4 Thor tells Jane, who at the time he didn't know was Jane, that she needs a name for people to call her so why not call herself Thor since he was going through some things and didn't plan on Thoring.


And did she tell him that while he was just hanging out being an ordinary person, he should call himself Jane? Whatever explanation they gave it, it's silly, though it's not hard to get why they really did it.

"I confer upon you the title of Thor!"

"Huh? I thought Thor was just your name. Isn't the title 'God of Thunder'?"

"That's the job title, yes. But the title of this comic book is 'Thor'. You want to star in this book, you have to take the name."

"You have no faith in your readers and think having a differently named hero as the star for awhile would hopelessly confuse and annoy them, don't you?"

"I'd prefer you didn't say it in a way that suggests comic book fans are easily ruffled dorks, but yes."
 
2020-10-25 11:30:21 AM  

EdgeRunner: TheMarchHare: Also in issue 4 Thor tells Jane, who at the time he didn't know was Jane, that she needs a name for people to call her so why not call herself Thor since he was going through some things and didn't plan on Thoring.

And did she tell him that while he was just hanging out being an ordinary person, he should call himself Jane? Whatever explanation they gave it, it's silly, though it's not hard to get why they really did it.

"I confer upon you the title of Thor!"

"Huh? I thought Thor was just your name. Isn't the title 'God of Thunder'?"

"That's the job title, yes. But the title of this comic book is 'Thor'. You want to star in this book, you have to take the name."

"You have no faith in your readers and think having a differently named hero as the star for awhile would hopelessly confuse and annoy them, don't you?"

"I'd prefer you didn't say it in a way that suggests comic book fans are easily ruffled dorks, but yes."



Would you prefer they went the way they did with another character and call her "Thor Girl" or "Thor Woman"?

The hammer IS Thor.  Whosoever holds this hammer, if they be worthy, shall possess the power of Thor. Not just Thor's powers, but the power of Thor. See the long description above for big detail, but the short version is that Odin trapped the godly half of Thor's soul in the hammer. Whoever holds it and is worthy (and "worthy" is a definition known only to Odin and the Norns) gains that part of Thor's soul.

They become Thor, or half-Thor anyway.

Other who held it did use other names. But they were still Thor. And yes, Thor is Thor, but Thor the Asgardian and Thor the god are split. He's only whole when he wields Mjolnir. When he doesn't have it, he's only Thor Odinson, the Asgardian. When he has Mjolnir, he's Thor, God of Thunder.

Jane isn't becoming Thor Odinson, the Asgardian. She's becoming Thor, God of Thunder, because that part of Thor's soul will reside in her when she holds Mjolnir because Odin, like all godly All-Fathers, is a real dick.
 
2020-10-25 11:33:43 AM  
However, this all does make for a great innuendo-laden joke:


How did Jane feel after taking Thor's hammer?

She wath really thor.
 
2020-10-25 12:14:48 PM  

WilderKWight: EdgeRunner: TheMarchHare: Also in issue 4 Thor tells Jane, who at the time he didn't know was Jane, that she needs a name for people to call her so why not call herself Thor since he was going through some things and didn't plan on Thoring.

And did she tell him that while he was just hanging out being an ordinary person, he should call himself Jane? Whatever explanation they gave it, it's silly, though it's not hard to get why they really did it.

"I confer upon you the title of Thor!"

"Huh? I thought Thor was just your name. Isn't the title 'God of Thunder'?"

"That's the job title, yes. But the title of this comic book is 'Thor'. You want to star in this book, you have to take the name."

"You have no faith in your readers and think having a differently named hero as the star for awhile would hopelessly confuse and annoy them, don't you?"

"I'd prefer you didn't say it in a way that suggests comic book fans are easily ruffled dorks, but yes."


Would you prefer they went the way they did with another character and call her "Thor Girl" or "Thor Woman"?

The hammer IS Thor.  Whosoever holds this hammer, if they be worthy, shall possess the power of Thor. Not just Thor's powers, but the power of Thor. See the long description above for big detail, but the short version is that Odin trapped the godly half of Thor's soul in the hammer. Whoever holds it and is worthy (and "worthy" is a definition known only to Odin and the Norns) gains that part of Thor's soul.

They become Thor, or half-Thor anyway.

Other who held it did use other names. But they were still Thor. And yes, Thor is Thor, but Thor the Asgardian and Thor the god are split. He's only whole when he wields Mjolnir. When he doesn't have it, he's only Thor Odinson, the Asgardian. When he has Mjolnir, he's Thor, God of Thunder.

Jane isn't becoming Thor Odinson, the Asgardian. She's becoming Thor, God of Thunder, because that part of Thor's soul will reside in her when she holds Mjolnir because Odin, like all godly All-Fathers, is a real dick.


Nah, it's still dumb. She gets the powers of Thor, but she doesn't become Thor himself. She isn't expected to hang out with his friends and live in his house and try to pass herself off as him, nor does she transform into a hairy Norse man whenever she uses the hammer. She's still herself despite the power boost, and should logically call herself "Jane, Goddess of Thunder", not "Thor Woman" or "Thor Girl" which don't make any sense. That really would be like Batwoman calling herself Lady Bruce.

Besides, when Thor became the new ruler of Asgard, he didn't suddenly start calling himself Odin. Nor did Valkyrie when he passed the powers on to her. (Whatever Odin's powers are supposed to be. The not-so-useful ability to nap for days on end, I think.) It's a silly idea.
 
2020-10-25 3:28:58 PM  

WilderKWight: However, this all does make for a great innuendo-laden joke:


How did Jane feel after taking Thor's hammer?

She wath really thor.


"You're thor? I'm tho thor I can barely pith."
 
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