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(NPR)   NASA spills asteroid dust, asks for a bucket or maybe that bag over there to catch some before it all floats away   (npr.org) divider line
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3558 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Oct 2020 at 10:00 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-24 10:04:30 AM  
See? It did need a tiny unprotected exhaust port to work properly.
 
2020-10-24 10:05:15 AM  
Were these "rocks" from Phoebe?
 
2020-10-24 10:06:26 AM  

epyonyx: Were these "rocks" from Phoebe?


Doors and corners, kid.
 
2020-10-24 10:09:30 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 10:16:37 AM  
Hide it under the refrigerator, like I do. It'll be there forever.
 
2020-10-24 10:25:16 AM  
 
2020-10-24 10:31:46 AM  
Ten Things to Know About the Carbonaceuos Asteroid Bennu

Conspicuously missing from the list:IT'S ALIVE!
 
2020-10-24 10:32:14 AM  
It's now looking like the collection device must have penetrated farther down into the asteroid's surface than expected

bow chicka wow wow
 
2020-10-24 10:32:57 AM  
So they went drilling and now they're losing material prematurely. So much so, that their second drilling has been called off and all they want to do is put the drill away safely and go home.  Ppfftt. Sounds like my typical Saturday night.
 
2020-10-24 10:33:01 AM  

mrparks: See? It did need a tiny unprotected exhaust port to work properly.


And risk a bunch of terrorists blowing it up using a radicalized religious farm boy, a monarchist, and a known set of criminals? No thank you.
 
2020-10-24 10:41:48 AM  
Can't handle a bag of dirt?

#DefundNPR
 
2020-10-24 10:42:53 AM  

epyonyx: Were these "rocks" from Phoebe?


Better drop it into Venus, just to be sure.
 
2020-10-24 10:43:52 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Got a little greedy
 
2020-10-24 10:43:52 AM  
Dammit NASA!

media-amazon.comView Full Size

 
2020-10-24 10:44:33 AM  
Cool read - hope they close that dust-gap.
 
2020-10-24 10:48:10 AM  
It's less the dust and more NASA can't get their rocks off.
 
2020-10-24 10:52:28 AM  
The PBS Nova about this mission is great.
 
2020-10-24 10:58:31 AM  
I mean it's not the worst problem to have.
 
2020-10-24 10:58:39 AM  
Everyone knows Japan did this a decade ago, right? The Hayabusa mission. The trick is to just barely kiss the asteroid, scoop and scoot. You do not even have to land to get a sample.

I am sure NASA can get it all wrapped up. Not too familiar with the mission, budgeted at 1 billion dollars, but they have to get all the way back and have the sample get through re-entry without any corruption of the material by anything. Even exposure to air would really degrade the value of the sample.

The Japan sample had a part of it corrupted on re-entry, if I recall, but the loss was slight.

The second Hayabusa mission will be finishing in December, with the second sample. Budgeted at 150 million dollars.
 
2020-10-24 11:00:53 AM  
Just let it restart.  It probably needs to finish installing updates after patch Tuesday.
 
2020-10-24 11:01:59 AM  
Little known fact:
this is how they make astronaut ice cream
 
2020-10-24 11:04:04 AM  
The team who designed the "flap" that is stuck right now, must be feeling really great.


It got clogged by a bunch of rocks.  Not exactly an unlikely scenario.
 
2020-10-24 11:06:09 AM  

2fardownthread: Everyone knows Japan did this a decade ago, right? The Hayabusa mission. The trick is to just barely kiss the asteroid, scoop and scoot. You do not even have to land to get a sample.

I am sure NASA can get it all wrapped up. Not too familiar with the mission, budgeted at 1 billion dollars, but they have to get all the way back and have the sample get through re-entry without any corruption of the material by anything. Even exposure to air would really degrade the value of the sample.

The Japan sample had a part of it corrupted on re-entry, if I recall, but the loss was slight.

The second Hayabusa mission will be finishing in December, with the second sample. Budgeted at 150 million dollars.


Yeah but the US version makes a really cool eagle call as it reenters the atmosphere and causes everyone nearby to spontaneously tear up and start singing The Star Spangled Banner...that's worth $800-900 million extra, right?
 
2020-10-24 11:08:21 AM  

Hey Nurse!: So they went drilling and now they're losing material prematurely. So much so, that their second drilling has been called off and all they want to do is put the drill away safely and go home.  Ppfftt. Sounds like my typical Saturday night.


This. Intending to drill multiple times is a nice plan to have but after prematurely spilling material in the first attempt, subsequent attempts seem pointless. And I get sleepy.
 
2020-10-24 11:10:10 AM  
"Clean-up on Aisle 7.  Clean-up on Aisle 7."
 
2020-10-24 11:15:27 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 11:25:01 AM  
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They delved too greedily and too deep.
 
2020-10-24 11:28:10 AM  

khatores: 2fardownthread: Everyone knows Japan did this a decade ago, right? The Hayabusa mission. The trick is to just barely kiss the asteroid, scoop and scoot. You do not even have to land to get a sample.

I am sure NASA can get it all wrapped up. Not too familiar with the mission, budgeted at 1 billion dollars, but they have to get all the way back and have the sample get through re-entry without any corruption of the material by anything. Even exposure to air would really degrade the value of the sample.

The Japan sample had a part of it corrupted on re-entry, if I recall, but the loss was slight.

The second Hayabusa mission will be finishing in December, with the second sample. Budgeted at 150 million dollars.

Yeah but the US version makes a really cool eagle call as it reenters the atmosphere and causes everyone nearby to spontaneously tear up and start singing The Star Spangled Banner...that's worth $800-900 million extra, right?


That's very much an apples-to-oranges comparison.  The first Hayabusa mission launched in 2003, cost of $250M, and collected less than one milligram of material after orbiting Itokawa for three months -- so little that they apparently can't measure the mass.

Hayabusa2 was estimated to cost $150-200M in 2010, but total cost was more like $270M; it hasn't returned its sample yet, but they think it collected 0.1 grams of material after orbiting Ryuga for about 17 months.

OSIRIS-REx planned to collect at least 60 grams of material, and they think they got substantially more than that, while also spending longer at the asteroid.  And OSIRIS-REx has almost twice the dry mass (almost 3.5x the launch mass) of Hayabusa2; 2.3x and 4.1x times the dry/launch mass of the original Hayabusa.
 
2020-10-24 11:38:44 AM  
Wonder if someone could ask Elon Musk to get a simple container up there and get it really secured inside before bringing it back down? Seems like you just need a re-entry capsule big enough to hold the actual re-entry capsule.

Let's make it work in KSP first?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 11:48:08 AM  

Dork Gently: OSIRIS-REx planned to collect at least 60 grams of material, and they think they got substantially more than that, while also spending longer at the asteroid.


The sampler could hold up to 2kg of material, and they may have gotten that.  While shooting for 60 grams they will likely come home with hundreds I'm told.

Thanks for the Hayabusa numbers too.  I knew about the missions but didn't realize the sample sizes were that small.

bucket_pup: Wonder if someone could ask Elon Musk to get a simple container up there and get it really secured inside before bringing it back down?


They're not returning the sample in the same thing that took it.  It has a sealed system that they can put the sample in for return.  They were going to spin the spacecraft around to measure how much they had in the sampler but that's being aborted, 'cuz it's full, and they're just going to stow it for reentry.

Besides that, uh, no, you can't just send something out to snag it.  Even assuming we had a design ready to go right now and it was built just getting there would be a mess.
 
2020-10-24 12:01:44 PM  
You dont just spill a bucket in space. Obviously the aliens at nasa are working to keep their secrets safe
 
2020-10-24 12:04:41 PM  
Probes for politicians are full of something, too. Unfortunately, it's not dust and is force-fed to America constantly.
 
2020-10-24 12:21:18 PM  
Saddest song ever written.

Cause my buckets got a hole in it
Cause my buckets got a hole in it
Cause my buckets got a hole in it
Cant buy no beer
 
2020-10-24 12:22:16 PM  
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2020-10-24 12:23:04 PM  

2fardownthread: I am sure NASA can get it all wrapped up. Not too familiar with the mission, budgeted at 1 billion dollars, but they have to get all the way back and have the sample get through re-entry without any corruption of the material by anything. Even exposure to air would really degrade the value of the sample.


genesismission.jpl.nasa.govView Full Size

It's still good. It's still good.
 
2020-10-24 12:31:28 PM  

Ivo Shandor: 2fardownthread: I am sure NASA can get it all wrapped up. Not too familiar with the mission, budgeted at 1 billion dollars, but they have to get all the way back and have the sample get through re-entry without any corruption of the material by anything. Even exposure to air would really degrade the value of the sample.

[genesismission.jpl.nasa.gov image 700x466]
It's still good. It's still good.


That'll buff out, no need to get insurance involved.
 
2020-10-24 12:41:47 PM  
It's pronounced "bouquet"

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-24 2:45:48 PM  

uberaverage: The PBS Nova about this mission is great.


Yeah, they got me again...
*Turn on Nova*  "...That was yesterday!"

/The video editors are like... gods among men.
 
2020-10-24 3:23:39 PM  

jbuist: Dork Gently: OSIRIS-REx planned to collect at least 60 grams of material, and they think they got substantially more than that, while also spending longer at the asteroid.

The sampler could hold up to 2kg of material, and they may have gotten that.  While shooting for 60 grams they will likely come home with hundreds I'm told.

Thanks for the Hayabusa numbers too.  I knew about the missions but didn't realize the sample sizes were that small.

bucket_pup: Wonder if someone could ask Elon Musk to get a simple container up there and get it really secured inside before bringing it back down?

They're not returning the sample in the same thing that took it.  It has a sealed system that they can put the sample in for return.  They were going to spin the spacecraft around to measure how much they had in the sampler but that's being aborted, 'cuz it's full, and they're just going to stow it for reentry.

Besides that, uh, no, you can't just send something out to snag it.  Even assuming we had a design ready to go right now and it was built just getting there would be a mess.


Huh.......I did not ask YOU to build it....Elon would probably be the only one with the technology to try it. I followed the mission too, so I know all about the problems they are up against here.
 
2020-10-24 3:40:45 PM  

Ivo Shandor: 2fardownthread: I am sure NASA can get it all wrapped up. Not too familiar with the mission, budgeted at 1 billion dollars, but they have to get all the way back and have the sample get through re-entry without any corruption of the material by anything. Even exposure to air would really degrade the value of the sample.

[genesismission.jpl.nasa.gov image 700x466]
It's still good. It's still good.


And what's crazy is they're still getting useful science out of the samples, it's just taking more time and effort.
 
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