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(PennLive)   Two trailer hitches go 'round the outside, but is it legal?   (pennlive.com) divider line
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6241 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Oct 2020 at 12:35 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-21 11:40:52 AM  
Some hookups like that are legal around here, called "recreational doubles." (giggity). Though I call them a Redneck Train.
 
2020-10-21 11:50:25 AM  

ChrisDe: Some hookups like that are legal around here, called "recreational doubles." (giggity). Though I call them a Redneck Train.


Also giggity.  Unavoidable giggity
 
2020-10-21 11:51:15 AM  
Early Cuyler has had a truck-boat-car for years.
 
2020-10-21 11:54:40 AM  
Guess whose back? Back again?
 
2020-10-21 12:15:17 PM  
It varies by state, but it's pretty dangerous everywhere. Even the triple-semis that are pretty common in the West are sketchy as hell. Last week I was in NV/UT and passed a couple of UPS/Fedex haulers that had at least 8"-12" of tailwhip on the third trailer, and it wasn't even windy.

Makes sense to have road trains in rural Oz, but it seems weird on busy US roads around cities.
 
2020-10-21 12:36:23 PM  
if i see that shiat, i'm getting in front of it as fast as possible
 
2020-10-21 12:37:22 PM  
Legal or illegal?

Depends on if they're black and if not, how much weed do they have.
 
2020-10-21 12:37:53 PM  
No and it's stupid.
 
2020-10-21 12:38:10 PM  
A friend of mine used to do do this.  He had a camper trailer he pulled with is pickup and then had a boat hooked to a hitch on the camper trailer.

One day he put the whole works into the ditch and flipped it on it's side, totalling everything.  After that he was done with that set up.
 
2020-10-21 12:39:48 PM  
Is it legal?

Are they related?

Yes?

Then yes.
 
2020-10-21 12:42:17 PM  
Odds that the owner/operator is over 70?
 
2020-10-21 12:43:07 PM  
I like how "Trooper Bob" somehow felt safe enough to take a picture of that rolling jack knife interstate pileup.... you know, for his Twitter hits.
 
2020-10-21 12:44:29 PM  
It's legal in Michigan.

We call it a "Michigan Train".
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-10-21 12:45:44 PM  
I was amused that the boat appears attached to the hitch on the Kia Soul.  So there's another level of sketchiness, possibly exacerbated by how poorly the Soul may be tied-down to the trailer it's riding on.
 
2020-10-21 12:47:49 PM  
 
2020-10-21 12:48:20 PM  
How dare you try to restrict his freedoms?
 
2020-10-21 12:48:27 PM  
Eminem - Without Me (Official Video)
Youtube YVkUvmDQ3HY
 
2020-10-21 12:50:57 PM  

Opacity: I like how "Trooper Bob" somehow felt safe enough to take a picture of that rolling jack knife interstate pileup.... you know, for his Twitter hits.


With his phone. Probably while driving.
 
2020-10-21 12:53:47 PM  

The Madd Mann: Opacity: I like how "Trooper Bob" somehow felt safe enough to take a picture of that rolling jack knife interstate pileup.... you know, for his Twitter hits.

With his phone. Probably while driving.


While approaching from behind in the right lane. Not actually illegal in most states, but really dangerous, especially behind that thing that might decide it shouldn't be in the left lane all of the sudden. You'd think it's been there for 37 miles, but be careful, it can make sudden, unexpected moves.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-10-21 12:59:16 PM  

NikolaiFarkoff: It varies by state, but it's pretty dangerous everywhere. Even the triple-semis that are pretty common in the West are sketchy as hell. Last week I was in NV/UT and passed a couple of UPS/Fedex haulers that had at least 8"-12" of tailwhip on the third trailer, and it wasn't even windy.

Makes sense to have road trains in rural Oz, but it seems weird on busy US roads around cities.


The problem with those is that there effectively are five trailers, not three.  First trailer is the normal van-body riding on the fifth-wheel of the tractor.  Second trailer is the first bogie hooked at the pintle to the van-body.  Third trailer is the second van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the first bogie.  Fourth trailer is the second bogie hooked at the pintle to the second van-body.  Fifth trailer is the third van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the second bogie.

Fark user imageView Full Size


With that many joints, it's imperative that all brakes are working properly, that tires are good, that alignments are good, and conditions like uneven traction on the road can pose big problems, especially in panic-stops.

In Australia "Road trains" are common enough for crossing the vast undeveloped center of the continent, but those are on roads that may barely qualify as such and don't see a lot of vehicle traffic.  American "triples" like this are driven in-traffic on heavily used roads.
 
2020-10-21 1:01:53 PM  

Opacity: The Madd Mann: Opacity: I like how "Trooper Bob" somehow felt safe enough to take a picture of that rolling jack knife interstate pileup.... you know, for his Twitter hits.

With his phone. Probably while driving.

While approaching from behind in the right lane. Not actually illegal in most states, but really dangerous, especially behind that thing that might decide it shouldn't be in the left lane all of the sudden. You'd think it's been there for 37 miles, but be careful, it can make sudden, unexpected moves.


I've noticed that many states 'passing on the right' laws only apply to using the shoulder to pass. In this case I'd get away from that craziness asap.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-10-21 1:02:05 PM  

Opacity: The Madd Mann: Opacity: I like how "Trooper Bob" somehow felt safe enough to take a picture of that rolling jack knife interstate pileup.... you know, for his Twitter hits.

With his phone. Probably while driving.

While approaching from behind in the right lane. Not actually illegal in most states, but really dangerous, especially behind that thing that might decide it shouldn't be in the left lane all of the sudden. You'd think it's been there for 37 miles, but be careful, it can make sudden, unexpected moves.


Overtaking slow traffic that's in the left lane by going around on the right is not legally as problem for the overtaking-driver as far as I'm aware, anywhere.  As far as I am aware, laws governing such typically require slower traffic to keep-right or put the burden on the slow traffic to not be-passed on the right.
 
2020-10-21 1:04:47 PM  

TWX: NikolaiFarkoff: It varies by state, but it's pretty dangerous everywhere. Even the triple-semis that are pretty common in the West are sketchy as hell. Last week I was in NV/UT and passed a couple of UPS/Fedex haulers that had at least 8"-12" of tailwhip on the third trailer, and it wasn't even windy.

Makes sense to have road trains in rural Oz, but it seems weird on busy US roads around cities.

The problem with those is that there effectively are five trailers, not three.  First trailer is the normal van-body riding on the fifth-wheel of the tractor.  Second trailer is the first bogie hooked at the pintle to the van-body.  Third trailer is the second van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the first bogie.  Fourth trailer is the second bogie hooked at the pintle to the second van-body.  Fifth trailer is the third van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the second bogie.

[Fark user image image 850x472]

With that many joints, it's imperative that all brakes are working properly, that tires are good, that alignments are good, and conditions like uneven traction on the road can pose big problems, especially in panic-stops.

In Australia "Road trains" are common enough for crossing the vast undeveloped center of the continent, but those are on roads that may barely qualify as such and don't see a lot of vehicle traffic.  American "triples" like this are driven in-traffic on heavily used roads.


Triples are only legal in 13 states west of the Mississippi. As you might imagine, they are among the least populated.
 
2020-10-21 1:05:35 PM  

TWX: Opacity: The Madd Mann: Opacity: I like how "Trooper Bob" somehow felt safe enough to take a picture of that rolling jack knife interstate pileup.... you know, for his Twitter hits.

With his phone. Probably while driving.

While approaching from behind in the right lane. Not actually illegal in most states, but really dangerous, especially behind that thing that might decide it shouldn't be in the left lane all of the sudden. You'd think it's been there for 37 miles, but be careful, it can make sudden, unexpected moves.

Overtaking slow traffic that's in the left lane by going around on the right is not legally as problem for the overtaking-driver as far as I'm aware, anywhere.  As far as I am aware, laws governing such typically require slower traffic to keep-right or put the burden on the slow traffic to not be-passed on the right.


Yes, correct, "undertaking" is not illegal in any of the 50 states of the US.
 
2020-10-21 1:06:56 PM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: TWX: NikolaiFarkoff: It varies by state, but it's pretty dangerous everywhere. Even the triple-semis that are pretty common in the West are sketchy as hell. Last week I was in NV/UT and passed a couple of UPS/Fedex haulers that had at least 8"-12" of tailwhip on the third trailer, and it wasn't even windy.

Makes sense to have road trains in rural Oz, but it seems weird on busy US roads around cities.

The problem with those is that there effectively are five trailers, not three.  First trailer is the normal van-body riding on the fifth-wheel of the tractor.  Second trailer is the first bogie hooked at the pintle to the van-body.  Third trailer is the second van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the first bogie.  Fourth trailer is the second bogie hooked at the pintle to the second van-body.  Fifth trailer is the third van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the second bogie.

[Fark user image image 850x472]

With that many joints, it's imperative that all brakes are working properly, that tires are good, that alignments are good, and conditions like uneven traction on the road can pose big problems, especially in panic-stops.

In Australia "Road trains" are common enough for crossing the vast undeveloped center of the continent, but those are on roads that may barely qualify as such and don't see a lot of vehicle traffic.  American "triples" like this are driven in-traffic on heavily used roads.

Triples are only legal in 13 states west of the Mississippi. As you might imagine, they are among the least populated.


Triples are common on the Ohio and Indiana Turnpikes (I-80/90) as many cargo carriers have large scale distribution centers on the OH/PA border and the IN/IL borders.
 
2020-10-21 1:10:53 PM  

Wanderlusting: Adolf Oliver Nipples: TWX: NikolaiFarkoff: It varies by state, but it's pretty dangerous everywhere. Even the triple-semis that are pretty common in the West are sketchy as hell. Last week I was in NV/UT and passed a couple of UPS/Fedex haulers that had at least 8"-12" of tailwhip on the third trailer, and it wasn't even windy.

Makes sense to have road trains in rural Oz, but it seems weird on busy US roads around cities.

The problem with those is that there effectively are five trailers, not three.  First trailer is the normal van-body riding on the fifth-wheel of the tractor.  Second trailer is the first bogie hooked at the pintle to the van-body.  Third trailer is the second van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the first bogie.  Fourth trailer is the second bogie hooked at the pintle to the second van-body.  Fifth trailer is the third van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the second bogie.

[Fark user image image 850x472]

With that many joints, it's imperative that all brakes are working properly, that tires are good, that alignments are good, and conditions like uneven traction on the road can pose big problems, especially in panic-stops.

In Australia "Road trains" are common enough for crossing the vast undeveloped center of the continent, but those are on roads that may barely qualify as such and don't see a lot of vehicle traffic.  American "triples" like this are driven in-traffic on heavily used roads.

Triples are only legal in 13 states west of the Mississippi. As you might imagine, they are among the least populated.

Triples are common on the Ohio and Indiana Turnpikes (I-80/90) as many cargo carriers have large scale distribution centers on the OH/PA border and the IN/IL borders.


This. Not to mention double-trailer dirt haulers/dump-bed semis, especially around construction sites.

I see Fedex, UPS, and those dump trucks all the damn time around here in MI.
 
2020-10-21 1:14:16 PM  

Joe USer: I've noticed that many states 'passing on the right' laws only apply to using the shoulder to pass.


Wanderlusting: Yes, correct, "undertaking" is not illegal in any of the 50 states of the US.


Yep, lots of artistic license in my original comment... I was trying to say "Keep right except to pass" which is really only a suggestion even in states it is a law on the books
 
2020-10-21 1:15:18 PM  
Those boats are small enough that they could easily could have been carried on the rack of the car carrier. Seems like Bubba RV guy was just too lazy to make that happen.
 
2020-10-21 1:17:12 PM  
Pennsylvania?

Is there a red flag tied to the back?
 
2020-10-21 1:18:23 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-21 1:30:52 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-21 1:45:29 PM  

TWX: I was amused that the boat appears attached to the hitch on the Kia Soul.  So there's another level of sketchiness, possibly exacerbated by how poorly the Soul may be tied-down to the trailer it's riding on.


This is what's most questionable in my mind. No way the car hauler was intended to hold a vehicle that is itself pulling another trailer.
 
2020-10-21 2:17:21 PM  
Opacity:
While approaching from behind in the right lane. Not actually illegal in most states, but really dangerous, especially behind that thing that might decide it shouldn't be in the left lane all of the sudden. You'd think it's been there for 37 miles, but be careful, it can make sudden, unexpected moves.

In at least one respect it's less dangerous - you have a breakdown lane that you can always ditch into. If you're in the left lane there won't be (except on more modern highways) and there may not even be a shoulder (guard rail, bridge, etc).
 
2020-10-21 2:19:20 PM  
Suicide Squad❤Suits up scene
Youtube PLy7ZGm3WT8
 
2020-10-21 2:44:56 PM  
There are good and sufficient reasons my late Texan wife referred to the thing in front as a Runnamuck.
 
2020-10-21 2:47:18 PM  
I believe this map is up to date:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Double towing is legal in most states.
I agree with the posters up-thread that said it's stupid
I've seen a lot of RV folks doing this and I've seen quite a few of them screw up by misjudging the turn radius (hint: when turning, towed vehicles follow a smaller radius than the towing vehicle)
 
2020-10-21 2:56:20 PM  
I wonder if the boat trailer is properly wired through for the brake and other lights.  If it's hooked up to the SUV, that's not going to be effective.
 
2020-10-21 2:57:42 PM  
Pssshh. What could go wrong?
 
2020-10-21 3:00:26 PM  
So the question of is it legal (in the U.S.) varies by state. In many cases you have to have operating brakes on both trailers because the weight exceeds a set number. Also, how are the lights hooked up?

In some cases, if you're doing this with an RV trailer that exceeds 28.5 feet, you can't have a second trailer because of the length laws (neither trailer in a dual set can exceed 28.5 feet), primarily east of the Mississippi.

I believe there are some states that don't allow more than one ball hitch in any combination of vehicles.

It's also at least unwise if you can't see the rear trailer in your mirrors, which is often the case because it's narrower than the RV trailer.

As others said above, the worst part of this one is using the ball hitch on the Kia Soul. What kind of and how many tie downs is he using for the Kia? He could well be exceeding the working load limits.

What's the towing and GCWR limits of that RV?
 
2020-10-21 3:19:03 PM  
If he can, as is, back it into his camping spot in say, three attempts/five minutes then he's good to go forward as well.  None of this pull through nonsense while testing to see if you're good enough.  Once you prove that, then you can use the pull through...
 
2020-10-21 3:24:20 PM  

Recoil Therapy: If he can, as is, back it into his camping spot in say, three attempts/five minutes then he's good to go forward as well.  None of this pull through nonsense while testing to see if you're good enough.  Once you prove that, then you can use the pull through...


When I first got my fifth wheel trailer, I spent 3 hours practicing backing up and backing into spaces. I didn't want to embarrass myself when I started traveling and staying in campgrounds. The practice paid off many times.
 
2020-10-21 3:55:11 PM  
In Michigan is it legal as long as you have two trailer park girls with you.
 
2020-10-21 4:01:16 PM  

s_mcdonald: Early Cuyler has had a truck-boat-car for years.


It was a truck-boat-truck actually.  Which is slightly more trashy.
 
2020-10-21 4:34:27 PM  

Nobody in Peculiar: I believe this map is up to date:

[Fark user image 560x507]

Double towing is legal in most states.
I agree with the posters up-thread that said it's stupid
I've seen a lot of RV folks doing this and I've seen quite a few of them screw up by misjudging the turn radius (hint: when turning, towed vehicles follow a smaller radius than the towing vehicle)


maybe it is the weird 3d showdow effect on the map, but it appears that doubles are legal in some of the middle islands of HI?
 
2020-10-21 4:36:34 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: Nobody in Peculiar: I believe this map is up to date:

[Fark user image 560x507]

Double towing is legal in most states.
I agree with the posters up-thread that said it's stupid
I've seen a lot of RV folks doing this and I've seen quite a few of them screw up by misjudging the turn radius (hint: when turning, towed vehicles follow a smaller radius than the towing vehicle)

maybe it is the weird 3d showdow effect on the map, but it appears that doubles are legal in some of the middle islands of HI?


It's legal on the roads between the islands
 
2020-10-21 4:45:54 PM  
Did this once with an old Dodge van, 61 scout with a bumper tongue and a 12' Bayliner. The ass end of the van skated all over the road and it took 10 hours to make the normally 4.5 hour drive to Ely.
 
2020-10-21 5:28:18 PM  

I'm on the Brute Squad: It's legal in Michigan.

We call it a "Michigan Train".


I thought that was similar to a "rusty venture"
 
2020-10-21 6:23:58 PM  

Nadie_AZ: Guess whose back? Back again?


You forgot the wutwutwoot
 
2020-10-21 7:26:07 PM  

Adolf Oliver Nipples: TWX: NikolaiFarkoff: It varies by state, but it's pretty dangerous everywhere. Even the triple-semis that are pretty common in the West are sketchy as hell. Last week I was in NV/UT and passed a couple of UPS/Fedex haulers that had at least 8"-12" of tailwhip on the third trailer, and it wasn't even windy.

Makes sense to have road trains in rural Oz, but it seems weird on busy US roads around cities.

The problem with those is that there effectively are five trailers, not three.  First trailer is the normal van-body riding on the fifth-wheel of the tractor.  Second trailer is the first bogie hooked at the pintle to the van-body.  Third trailer is the second van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the first bogie.  Fourth trailer is the second bogie hooked at the pintle to the second van-body.  Fifth trailer is the third van-body resting on the fifth-wheel of the second bogie.

[Fark user image image 850x472]

With that many joints, it's imperative that all brakes are working properly, that tires are good, that alignments are good, and conditions like uneven traction on the road can pose big problems, especially in panic-stops.

In Australia "Road trains" are common enough for crossing the vast undeveloped center of the continent, but those are on roads that may barely qualify as such and don't see a lot of vehicle traffic.  American "triples" like this are driven in-traffic on heavily used roads.

Triples are only legal in 13 states west of the Mississippi. As you might imagine, they are among the least populated.


Legal in Ohio, but only on the turnpike (I80/I90) and to/from facilities directly adjacent to it. As far as recreational doubles, they're legal in about half of states but there are varying length restrictions even in those states where it's allowed.
 
2020-10-21 7:44:49 PM  
The Aussie road trains can steer the rear trailers and have dampening systems to keep them from getting out of control.  They aren't just hooked up like a normal trailer.

/knows someone who was in a car side swiped by one and it messed her up for life.
//you never pass a moving road train
///never let one pass you either and keep way ahead of them if you see one behind you because they can't slow down
 
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