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(Good Morning America)   Think dining in NYC is too expensive? Prepare to pay an extra 10% because of COVID   (goodmorningamerica.com) divider line
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405 clicks; posted to Business » on 21 Oct 2020 at 11:15 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



12 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-21 11:27:06 AM  
I don't get it - there aren't any weird restrictions that would prevent a restaurant from changing the price of a $15 item to $17, are there? It doesn't sound like this surcharge goes to the government or has any restricted use. Is it just legal support for a pricing scheme that is expected to be more acceptable to customers?
 
2020-10-21 11:27:42 AM  
Honestly?  When I went it wasn't much more than dining in Bellevue, WA.  Well, not unless you went to the upper end restaurants.
 
2020-10-21 11:31:26 AM  
Um... no?

If you're dining out right now, you're putting yourself at risk, potentially exposing yourself and lots of others to COVID-19. But, this has little to do with that...

"Restaurants in New York City have been getting crushed by massively increasing costs over the last five years and their options for increasing revenue have been narrowing. This new policy is coming as a result of the impact of COVID-19 on our city, but I have every intention of making this change permanent."

...and there we go. Don't let the name fool you - this isn't a "recovery charge," it's just a sanctioned 10% price hike, across the board, for restaurants who didn't want you to be spooked by price increases on the menus. No, instead, this will be simply tacked on and the resulting anger redirected to "...hey, it's the city, not us."

Restaurants owners who actually plan to add the new charge are required to clearly disclose the change on their menus and a customer's bill.

Sorry, not good enough. I want to know before you seat me. Period. Not after I'm seated, when getting up & leaving will cause a scene, and certainly not after I've ordered, where I've little choice but to pay it. If you're going to pull this shiat, at least be honest enough to tell me, up front, that you've taken the coward's way out & tacked on a "recovery charge" instead of increasing your menu prices to actually meet your needs.
 
2020-10-21 11:54:56 AM  
Easy-peasy... out of the tip it comes.


/Ducks
 
2020-10-21 11:55:02 AM  

OccamsWhiskers: I don't get it - there aren't any weird restrictions that would prevent a restaurant from changing the price of a $15 item to $17, are there? It doesn't sound like this surcharge goes to the government or has any restricted use. Is it just legal support for a pricing scheme that is expected to be more acceptable to customers?


It's basically a way to bait and switch you into paying more.

Fark the idiot that proposed this, and then fark them an extra 10%.
 
2020-10-21 11:57:26 AM  

Opacity: Easy-peasy... out of the tip it comes.


/Ducks


In this case, that's a valid protest.

Do it a few times, be blatant about it, and hopefully the waiters and waitresses will start advising you before you order, or the restaurants that impose the charge will be forced into giving that money to the waitstaff to survive.
 
2020-10-21 11:57:32 AM  

OccamsWhiskers: I don't get it - there aren't any weird restrictions that would prevent a restaurant from changing the price of a $15 item to $17, are there? It doesn't sound like this surcharge goes to the government or has any restricted use. Is it just legal support for a pricing scheme that is expected to be more acceptable to customers?


A couple of things -
The surcharge isn't mandatory - its unsure if any restaurants will actually do this. They absolutely can set their own prices - however if your hamburger & fries is $2-3 more expensive than the guy across the street it can affect your ability to attract and keep customers.

That being said - im guessing the "covid surcharge" might be an easier pill to swallow since its a "temporary" (we all hope) thing. The whole restaurant industry is based on adding undisclosed fees to the end of the bill (see: tipping) - so im not surprised this is the solution the industry came up with.
 
2020-10-21 12:16:58 PM  
"This bill will give restaurants the freedom they need to increase revenue to help cover rapidly rising labor and compliance costs and keep them in business,"


No they already have such freedoms all this does is provide them cover to do so in hopes of keeping the grumbling to a minimum.
 
2020-10-21 12:53:38 PM  
Ah yes, let's just adopt the "airline pricing model". Basically slam a paying customer (unsuspecting or otherwise) with additional fees. Best of all we can advertise prices such that they are low enough to break-even thus luring customers that we can slam with fees that in essence are our profit.
 
2020-10-21 12:53:41 PM  
I guess the guest doesn't pay tax on the surcharge?  Yay?
 
2020-10-21 1:42:24 PM  
Prior to the passage of this law, it was illegal to tack on a surcharge like this in a restaurant in NYC.  The more logical way to do this is to just increase the actual prices of items to reflect costs, IMHO.
 
2020-10-21 6:53:17 PM  

Geotpf: Prior to the passage of this law, it was illegal to tack on a surcharge like this in a restaurant in NYC.  The more logical way to do this is to just increase the actual prices of items to reflect costs, IMHO.


Either way, that's a dumb way to try and recover business right  now.
 
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