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(Abc.net.au)   Farmer drives himself to hospital after mishap with a hay baler. Well, most of himself   (abc.net.au) divider line
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4189 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Oct 2020 at 9:35 AM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-21 12:23:20 PM  
He didn't drive to the hospital, he only drove 400 meters. Don't lie in the headline without at least making it funny.
 
2020-10-21 12:28:51 PM  
A few years ago when Alberta brought in legislation to make farmers adopt the same safety policies as every other industry there were massive protests.
 
2020-10-21 12:37:30 PM  

Russ1642: A few years ago when Alberta brought in legislation to make farmers adopt the same safety policies as every other industry there were massive protests.


The farmers get mad when they buy their $300,000 tractor, and find out that it is run by completely proprietary software, you can't check the oil without voiding any warranty, and that John Deere is monitoring their work through software programs. So they tear everything up, and that includes all the safety programming.

Hell, I'd probably be back to using a mule and a plow
 
2020-10-21 12:45:40 PM  

SpaceBison: [YouTube video: Farmer jumps into hay bale - machine! xD ^^]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-21 12:49:50 PM  

rancher: I did advertising for a company that makes balers (among other farm stuff). There are safety interlocks ALL OVER those machines, You have to disable them to get your arm or hand in a running baler. And yes, they do disable them, ignore the warnings, get hurt badly. Then sue the manufacturer and win!


That is assuming the bailer is new. When I would bale hay and straw for by Uncle back in the mid 90s, he was using a small bail bailer where I would ride on the back of the wagon and stack the bails. That bailer that was probably built in the 70s. Looked a lot like this.
Fark user imageView Full Size


He still farming but he no longer has steers so his need for hay and straw is probably very low. Now he has a high rise chicken coop for eggs but does keep one barn for his great-neices and nephews to show hogs for the county 4H fair. So my guess is he is still using the same bailer today that he was using back then.

But still, not disengaging the PTO is a huge mistake.
 
2020-10-21 1:00:57 PM  
FTFA: "It's a pretty horrific story, he is travelling OK now, and they have somehow managed to put the arm back on.

A gotdamn doctor spent ~10 years in school -- studying decades of medical research -- and 5-10 more years in a resident position honing their craft. Then dozens of hours of surgery to reconstruct nerves, vessels, connective tissue and bones.

...and this hick says "they have somehow managed to put the arm back" as if three mechanics jury-rigged it together behind their shop using some bailing wire and duct tape.

I really wish I was as dumb as the hick. It would make life so much more tolerable amongst all these idiots.
 
2020-10-21 1:02:38 PM  

maestro8: FTFA: "It's a pretty horrific story, he is travelling OK now, and they have somehow managed to put the arm back on.

A gotdamn doctor spent ~10 years in school -- studying decades of medical research -- and 5-10 more years in a resident position honing their craft. Then dozens of hours of surgery to reconstruct nerves, vessels, connective tissue and bones.

...and this hick says "they have somehow managed to put the arm back" as if three mechanics jury-rigged it together behind their shop using some bailing wire and duct tape.

I really wish I was as dumb as the hick. It would make life so much more tolerable amongst all these idiots.


It's still better than waking up after a grueling marathon surgery and thanking God.
 
2020-10-21 1:14:35 PM  

Russ1642: maestro8: FTFA: "It's a pretty horrific story, he is travelling OK now, and they have somehow managed to put the arm back on.

A gotdamn doctor spent ~10 years in school -- studying decades of medical research -- and 5-10 more years in a resident position honing their craft. Then dozens of hours of surgery to reconstruct nerves, vessels, connective tissue and bones.

...and this hick says "they have somehow managed to put the arm back" as if three mechanics jury-rigged it together behind their shop using some bailing wire and duct tape.

I really wish I was as dumb as the hick. It would make life so much more tolerable amongst all these idiots.

It's still better than waking up after a grueling marathon surgery and thanking God.


Hallelujah, brother!
 
2020-10-21 1:17:09 PM  

UberDave: I imagine "hay bailer" and "accident" are words farmers don't like to hear together.


Like " Daddy, get off that hay bailer, I have to talk to you about the "accident" I had with the salesman."
 
2020-10-21 1:26:13 PM  

Nocrash: A routine check of a hay baler does not require sticking your arm into the equipment. But I have been close a few times. Generally never get off the tractor with the PTO shaft turning.  Sometimes there is not a second person to observe the functioning. Then it gets scary. You climb down very slowly and walk carefully with shoelaces well tied.

He probably tripped or stumbled and fell onto the baler. Farm workers are injured and killed at a higher rate than policemen.


Had a friend that had such a horror of that happening he wore cowboy boots any time he was on or around the machinery - apparently when he was a kid some neighbor got his foot sucked into something because of an errant shoelace and he was ginsu-ed.  Friend was not even the type to wear cowboy boots otherwise, and didn't other than out working with the machines.  He was absolutely religiously observant about that shiat - boots, nothing oversized clothing-wise, no trailing strings or whatnot - wouldn't even wear a hoodie out there because it had drawstrings.
 
2020-10-21 2:46:59 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-21 3:10:50 PM  
Had a neighbor who was teaching his wife to bushhog the pasture. Hs sat on the rear wheel fender as she drove.

At one point, she managed to pop the clutch, which caused the guy to roll off the back of the tractor and into the path of the bushhog. Lost his right arm above the elbow and the left leg below the knee. The fact all those blades missed his head is a miracle.

Dull blades meant the injuries were tear injuries instead of cut injuries, so the arteries pulled back inside the limbs and mostly stopped bleeding.

He got around with an artificial leg, but never got the artificial arm.
 
2020-10-21 4:09:31 PM  
Not anywhere close to funny.

Back when I was very young, say around 3 or 4, which would put it in '57 or '58, my Dad made the mistake of trying to unjam a corn picker without disengaging the PTO.  Going to the hospital to see him is one of the very earliest childhood memories I have.

It got his left hand, and took the middle three fingers, leaving him the thumb and little finger on that hand.  The first knuckles on the outer missing fingers were gone, too - that is, the knuckles right at the edge of the palm.  Having that knuckle still present on the middle finger made a weird 'bump' between the thumb and little finger.

I'm sure it was painful as hell, and it certainly couldn't have been convenient, but Dad kept soldiering right along, and I never heard a complaint out of him.  But it always bothered me that even after that, he still had a somewhat lax attitude towards safety shields and procedures.

Gods above, I miss you Dad.  You never had a lot to say, but you taught me more than either of us ever knew.
 
2020-10-21 4:22:54 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Not anywhere close to funny.

Back when I was very young, say around 3 or 4, which would put it in '57 or '58, my Dad made the mistake of trying to unjam a corn picker without disengaging the PTO.  Going to the hospital to see him is one of the very earliest childhood memories I have.

It got his left hand, and took the middle three fingers, leaving him the thumb and little finger on that hand.  The first knuckles on the outer missing fingers were gone, too - that is, the knuckles right at the edge of the palm.  Having that knuckle still present on the middle finger made a weird 'bump' between the thumb and little finger.

I'm sure it was painful as hell, and it certainly couldn't have been convenient, but Dad kept soldiering right along, and I never heard a complaint out of him.  But it always bothered me that even after that, he still had a somewhat lax attitude towards safety shields and procedures.

Gods above, I miss you Dad.  You never had a lot to say, but you taught me more than either of us ever knew.


This is somewhat similar to the machine that got Dad's hand.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Down inside that slot there are two steel cylinders that act as counterrotating rollers.  A cornstalk is guided between them, and as the machine moves forward, it's as though the rollers are moving up the stalk.  Their function is to pop the ears of corn off of the stalk.

That's the part that Dad was trying to unjam.
 
2020-10-21 4:39:20 PM  

August11: I was once apprentice to a master carpenter. On one job, I noticed another carpenter with a few missing fingers. My master told me that any machine tool will bite you the moment you disrespect it, show it slight regard. You must treat the tool as you would a colleague.

One afternoon in early winter, as the sun was dipping below the tree line, I was spent. Long day cutting risers and scaring nails into joists. I had a 2 x 6 that needed about half a foot taken off. I was too tired and lazy to walk the fifty feet to the horses, so I decided to use my lifted knee as a sawhorse. I trimmed the piece without incident. My master walks up behind me and claps my shoulder. He laughs, "You are one lucky young man. Because I have not seen a circular saw so disrespected in a long time."

/CSB off

That farmer disrespected his baler.


Indeed.  I learned my own lesson at a very early age.  I must have been around five or six.  We had been making hay with the old Roanoke baler, which had its own two-cylinder Wisconsin engine.

Fark user imageView Full Size

At the end, we finished up and someone stopped the baler's engine.  The machinery was stationary at the time.  I wanted to get from one side to the other, so I climbed over the baler's tongue, and was foolish enough to place the palm of my hand on that flying saucer-shaped 'muffler' on the baler's engine.

Even at that age, I had to admit I was a dumbass for not realizing the damn thing would still be hot.  Fortunately, no permanent damage done.

Later on, I had another incident.  The damn thing had clogged up, and we were trying to unjam it.  Had the engine stopped.  I was pulling on those four V-Belts that run power from the engine to the big pulley.

Well, the clog let loose, and I quickly had a thumb caught between four V-Belts and a four-gang pulley on the engine.  Again, I was pissed at myself for being stupid, and again, no permanent damage.
 
2020-10-21 5:15:51 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Nocrash: A routine check of a hay baler does not require sticking your arm into the equipment. But I have been close a few times. Generally never get off the tractor with the PTO shaft turning.  Sometimes there is not a second person to observe the functioning. Then it gets scary. You climb down very slowly and walk carefully with shoelaces well tied.

He probably tripped or stumbled and fell onto the baler. Farm workers are injured and killed at a higher rate than policemen.

Had a friend that had such a horror of that happening he wore cowboy boots any time he was on or around the machinery - apparently when he was a kid some neighbor got his foot sucked into something because of an errant shoelace and he was ginsu-ed.  Friend was not even the type to wear cowboy boots otherwise, and didn't other than out working with the machines.  He was absolutely religiously observant about that shiat - boots, nothing oversized clothing-wise, no trailing strings or whatnot - wouldn't even wear a hoodie out there because it had drawstrings.


Sounds like a very sensible individual if you ask me. Whenever I'm working around things that kill me, I tie my boots as tight as I can, then cram whatever lace is left over inside the boot. They still get out from time to time. No loose clothing though, t-shirt tucked into pants, or tucked under my work belt at the very least.

Still have all my fingers and toes, and I've never had a bad accident. There was one time I was cutting conduit with a sawzall, it was the end of the day, we just found out our Journeyman had been looking at outdated blueprints, because they had revised them at least three times without notifying us, or the drywallers. So we had to scramble our asses to get an entire wall of conduit pulled out, and moved over by two studs so the drywallers could get their shiat done.

Anyway, everyone was kind of pissed off, and I was hurrying to get new conduit bent and cut, so I braced a piece against my knee to cut it off with the sawzall. Done it quite a few times, but I pushed a little too hard, had it too close to my leg, and it went through and cut right into my pants. I expected to see a nice little red pool growing, but to my surprise it just kind of scratched me. Then there was a time I was putting in a panel, and there was a guy above me on a scissor lift pulling MC cables to the panel. I told him I was going to be under him, so let me know if he needs to drop or move the lift. Guess he forgot, because I suddenly felt a large bump on the back of my head, and a heavy pressure pushing down on me. I ducked down and yelled "What the fark are you doing? I'm down here!", he said I should've let him know that. I told him I did. Fun times.

As far as the story, I have a kind of cool story. One of my grandfathers was a farmer/rancher/carpenter for years. Well when he was around 60, he was out in the field driving a tractor, although it might've been a combine. It was about 12 feet up to the cab. He slipped coming out, and fell, broke his right arm completely, fractured his left arm; and he was alone because of course he was.

Anyway, this was well before cell phones, so he ended up having to drive himself to the hospital. And they had recently got rid of the hospital in the nearest town, so he ended up having to drive something like 30 miles, on dirt roads, with two broken arms, to the next town that had a hospital. And the truck was a stick shift. He never complained about it, but he was laid up for a few months until his arms healed. Still had all his digits and limbs when he passed though, because he respected the machines and tools he worked with, and he wasn't a dumbass. I would say he was as tough as nails; but nails couldn't hold a candle to that hardass SOB.

Still had one of the kindest hearts I've ever had the pleasure of knowing though. If he yelled at you, it was because you could've gotten yourself killed; dumbass.
 
2020-10-22 2:25:54 AM  

gwoardnog: Knew a guy who got wrapped around a PTO while augering out a fence post hole. He was working by himself. Keyword here is 'knew'.  Don't mess with running PTO's, especially by yourself. You won't even cause the engine to pull down.


This, grimly enough. Best way to lose a leg is to wear loose pants, then lean over a PTO to connect hydraulic lines - you'll lose the leg before you even realize an accident's occurred. Never stand behind the tractor while the PTO's on. You're not saving any time by doing a live hook-up; you're just risking your life by being both lazy & stupid.
 
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