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(Some Guy)   Football coach takes intentional 12 men on the field penalty to exploit loophole and get free timeout. Difficulty: Not Belichick   (atozsportsnashville.com) divider line
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1107 clicks; posted to Sports » on 20 Oct 2020 at 4:20 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-20 4:42:58 AM  
Coaches used to do this all the time, so the league introduced new rules in the last 2 minutes of the game such as a 10 second runoff to remove the incentive for teams to take deliberate penalties to stop the clock, and also give the non-offending team the option to run the clock on the referee's ready-for-play whistle rather than the snap (even if the previous down stopped the clock).

Now coaches are getting around those rules by doing the same penalty tricks outside of the last 2 minutes. The league could extend the rules to the last 3 or 5 minutes but I think they'll just leave it as is.
 
2020-10-20 4:43:21 AM  
😬🤫☑
 
2020-10-20 5:28:12 AM  
Not Belichick, but I'm sure Vrabel learned a few things under Belichick.
 
2020-10-20 7:51:42 AM  
Pete meet repeat.
 
2020-10-20 8:09:38 AM  
Brilliant.
 
2020-10-20 8:25:24 AM  
Yet in that pic his nose is hanging out of the mask....


But yes it was a well orchestrated decision
 
2020-10-20 8:34:47 AM  

Peter von Nostrand: Pete meet repeat.


Yeah he did it a few years ago too

/I know what you mean
 
2020-10-20 8:35:46 AM  
Houston could have declined it and simply run the extra play(s) to use up time, or make him burn a timeout. And they should have.  It wasn't so much that it stopped the clock, but that it reset the downs when Houston was pretty much guaranteed to convert anyway.
 
2020-10-20 8:46:51 AM  

Jack of All Games: Houston could have declined it and simply run the extra play(s) to use up time, or make him burn a timeout. And they should have.  It wasn't so much that it stopped the clock, but that it reset the downs when Houston was pretty much guaranteed to convert anyway.


Can Houston decline those? Vrabel did something similar versus the Patriots last year to keep the clock running, and you could see Belichek steaming on the sidelines.
 
2020-10-20 10:00:24 AM  

Ishkur: Coaches used to do this all the time, so the league introduced new rules in the last 2 minutes of the game such as a 10 second runoff to remove the incentive for teams to take deliberate penalties to stop the clock, and also give the non-offending team the option to run the clock on the referee's ready-for-play whistle rather than the snap (even if the previous down stopped the clock).

Now coaches are getting around those rules by doing the same penalty tricks outside of the last 2 minutes. The league could extend the rules to the last 3 or 5 minutes but I think they'll just leave it as is.


i'd extend it to the entire second half, entirely remove the incentive to pull that shiat
 
2020-10-20 3:13:22 PM  

Mercutio879: Jack of All Games: Houston could have declined it and simply run the extra play(s) to use up time, or make him burn a timeout. And they should have.  It wasn't so much that it stopped the clock, but that it reset the downs when Houston was pretty much guaranteed to convert anyway.

Can Houston decline those? Vrabel did something similar versus the Patriots last year to keep the clock running, and you could see Belichek steaming on the sidelines.


Maybe not?
I would think you should have the option to decline any penalty you choose. But maybe some are forced acceptance to avoid a stalemate situation where one side commits the penalty over and over while the other side declines.

It's a tough situation. On the one hand, you shouldn't be able to gain an advantage by committing a penalty. On the other hand, milking the clock, while effective, doesn't make for compelling viewing or competition.
 
2020-10-20 3:34:28 PM  

Jack of All Games: Mercutio879: Jack of All Games: Houston could have declined it and simply run the extra play(s) to use up time, or make him burn a timeout. And they should have.  It wasn't so much that it stopped the clock, but that it reset the downs when Houston was pretty much guaranteed to convert anyway.

Can Houston decline those? Vrabel did something similar versus the Patriots last year to keep the clock running, and you could see Belichek steaming on the sidelines.

Maybe not?
I would think you should have the option to decline any penalty you choose. But maybe some are forced acceptance to avoid a stalemate situation where one side commits the penalty over and over while the other side declines.

It's a tough situation. On the one hand, you shouldn't be able to gain an advantage by committing a penalty. On the other hand, milking the clock, while effective, doesn't make for compelling viewing or competition.


Probably about right. If Belichek declined, Vrabel would have just done it again. On the other hand, it was a gamble, the game wasn't over yet, and Vrabel was taking a chance that they'd be able to score and win the game.

In any event, the NFL changed the rules to keep that from happening at the end of the season.
 
2020-10-20 5:46:08 PM  
If you commit a penalty, the opposing team gets to decide if they want to accept the yardage AND they get to decide if they want a 10-second runoff + a 25-second play clock or to keep it stopped.

Then a penalty will be a penalty, instead of benefiting rule-breakers.
 
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