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(Business Insider)   Burgers, chicken wings, onion rings, and more. I think I'm in love with a robot   (businessinsider.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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627 clicks; posted to Food » on 19 Oct 2020 at 5:20 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



18 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-19 5:25:43 PM  
The fast food places are going to be even more profitable for the owners without all those pesky employees wanting things like 'pay'. And yeah, it's a shiat job, but for some people, it's their only one available.
 
2020-10-19 5:49:08 PM  
Well ask for 15 bucks an hour for a menial job that has no advancement, get automated. It was like McDonald's switching to self serve Kiosks and watching the cashiers teach customers "and you're just outsourcing yourself".
 
2020-10-19 5:56:47 PM  
So a payback time of 1 to 1,5 years?

Automation steals more jobs than immigrants.
 
2020-10-19 5:59:44 PM  
The design was created to assist busy cooks in a quick-service kitchen, installed under a kitchen hood to move along equipment while staying out of the staff's way.

Right.  For $30,000 each, you could replace your cooks and make your money back in under two year.
 
2020-10-19 6:09:54 PM  

Axeofjudgement: Well ask for 15 bucks an hour for a menial job that has no advancement, get automated. It was like McDonald's switching to self serve Kiosks and watching the cashiers teach customers "and you're just outsourcing yourself".


I'd say automate the burger flipping process, but have a human interact during the sale. Sales is too crucial to be left to an unemotional and non-feeling automaton. Having a nice smile, and friendly quip, and sincerity is what gets people back to the store. The coldness of a kiosk makes it hard to get return customers.
 
2020-10-19 6:26:02 PM  

AnEasyTarget: So a payback time of 1 to 1,5 years?

Automation steals more jobs than immigrants.


Automation CREATES more jobs than minimum wage labor. There is a need for people to sell these robots. Who better to sell than those who had their job obsoleted by these robots. Imagine if Joe Burgerflipper goes to the next McDonald's franchise and says, "Hi Mr. Manager. I used to be back in the kitchen just like yours flipping burgers. But that job's been obsoleted by this baby: $30,000, no whining, no sick days, no vacations, no asking for overtime..." They'll make more than what they did as burger flippers, and probably will have an advance-able career as opposed to a dead-end job. Others can go into Q/A, maintenance, customer service for those devices. Others might go into enterprise scale robotics. Perhaps they can be installed on military ships. Maybe group homes can have one of these. Maybe non-profit soup kitchens can have one. Maybe office cafeterias can have some. Maybe dormitory dining halls can have one. Can they be recalibrated to cook pasta? Cook pizza? Cook steak? Make salad? Those are other areas where lots of workers are needed to help train, program, tweak, and sell such tools.

Back in the 1900s, when the automobile just started getting into the market, horse-drawn carriages were the end-all and be-all for transportation (besides trolleys and trains). By automating vehicular transportation (after, it was called the AUTOmobile), we killed off almost all jobs related to horse-based transport: rearing, feeding, caring, shoeing, supplying hay or oats, shoveling road apples, building carriages, hansoms, wheels, axles, hand brakes...
In return, we created the largest and quite the longest sustaining employment segment, going from essentially 1910 to even now, with the hey-day from 1950-1990: the automobile manufacturing industry. That industry hired millions more people than the horse-based transport industry ever did or ever could. And secondary industries hired millions more: those were in the auto-parts industries, road maintenance and construction, legal, actuarial (insurance), detailing, repair, modifications, re-sales, scrapping. Then, the tertiary industries that fed off of supporting the primary and secondary industries: the restaurants, the diners near the work areas, the uniform stores that sold work garments for factory workers, as well as tailors and clothiers selling business suits for the white-collar folks, the home appliances stores that can now sell because workers earned enough to buy a refrigerator or a washing machine/dryer combo or a dishwasher (they not only earned enough, but because both parents were now employed, they didn't have time to wash clothes manually by hand).

And, of course, those tertiary industries had their own supply chain and secondary industries that benefitted from their increase sales, and so on.

In short, automation creates jobs. Always had, always will.
 
2020-10-19 6:31:16 PM  

dericwater: Having a nice smile, and friendly quip, and sincerity is what gets people back to the store.


You've been eating in better fast food joints that I have, apparently. Most of the cashiers I've dealt with were basically robots, just less competent.
 
2020-10-19 6:50:33 PM  

trialpha: dericwater: Having a nice smile, and friendly quip, and sincerity is what gets people back to the store.

You've been eating in better fast food joints that I have, apparently. Most of the cashiers I've dealt with were basically robots, just less competent.


I don't eat at fast food joints, in general, mainly because they don't have good cashiers. If they did, maybe I'll be more apt to go back. What you said basically proved my point.
 
2020-10-19 7:23:41 PM  
images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-19 7:39:21 PM  
" My old man he is dead and gone
Now I am your old man
And my advice to you, my son
Is to fight back while you can
Watch out for the man with the silicon chip
Hold on to your job with a good firm grip
'Cause if you don't you'll have had your chips
The same as my old man "

Ewan MacColl - My Old Man
Youtube ZlJ6P9EkoWw
 
2020-10-19 7:41:43 PM  
Ha-ha! Fir the price of a year's salary for one employee, they can now run that place for a decade!

And the best part? They don't have to give a shiat about what happened to the employee it just replaced! Unemployed? Homeless? Dead? Fark 'em!

Our social and financial structures aren't able to accommodate continued replacement of low-skilled workers, yet we're racing ahead with doing so at huge cost savings to the corporations who then turn around and lobby for lower taxes while sequestering wealth outside the legal domain of those able to provide those social & financial structures.

In short, the rich just got a lot richer, the poor just got a bit poorer, and we don't care because, hey, onion rings!

Assholes.
 
2020-10-19 8:00:25 PM  

dericwater: In short, automation creates jobs. Always had, always will.


As a net total? Probably. But, and here's the fun part - for whom?

Using prior examples is good as a guideline, but as so many have pointed out, the difference between what's happening now and what happened last century or so is that the jobs created now still require a more highly-skilled work force than before. The divide between high-level skills and low-level skills will continue to widen, with little or no middle ground.

The middle class blossomed because we had the capability to provide social & financial supports - G.I. Bill, colleges & universities, ready access to an infrastructure that supported the last century's growth, that sort of thing. In short, we could train & support a bunch of change, and we did so reasonably well. We don't have those opportunities at this time - in fact, we've watched our society spend the last 40 years seizing, rather than giving back, the benefits that our grandparents & parents received - increased personal time, better working conditions, more wealth. Wealth inequity, right now, is greater at this point, in this country, than it has ever been in our history, and the imbalance only increases. The gulf between haves & have-nots widens because our social & financial supports have not kept pace with this growth.

I mean, right now, 30 million Americans have no access to broadband. Only 65% of Americans in rural communities can reliably access broadband services. When we race ahead to telemedicine and virtual classrooms, that's about 9% of the population that's basically shiat outta luck, and the best we can do is "we're kinda thinking about putting in a shim for ya."

We keep leaving folks behind, then handwaving away their complaints even as we race ahead to a future that continues to enrich fewer & fewer people. I'm all for progress - my livelihood depends on shiat like this, quite frankly - but high tide has to lift all boats. Right now, it's not, and the brutal mechanics of wealth inequity in this country sees this kind of "innovation" not as a way of providing a better life at lower cost to all, but more profit at cheaper expense to just a few.

tl;dr: Universal healthcare, guaranteed education, and guaranteed basic income. Put them in place, and I'm your cheerleader for shiat like this.
 
2020-10-19 8:59:29 PM  

FormlessOne: We keep leaving folks behind, then handwaving away their complaints even as we race ahead to a future that continues to enrich fewer & fewer people. I'm all for progress - my livelihood depends on shiat like this, quite frankly - but high tide has to lift all boats. Right now, it's not, and the brutal mechanics of wealth inequity in this country sees this kind of "innovation" not as a way of providing a better life at lower cost to all, but more profit at cheaper expense to just a few.

tl;dr: Universal healthcare, guaranteed education, and guaranteed basic income. Put them in place, and I'm your cheerleader for shiat like this.


I agree we should have universal health, free education. Not sure about UBI, but certainly a decent substitute during the times of need: free food access, super-cheap housing, whatever. Those should definitely be in operation in the US.

As for your question of "for whom"? People will adapt to do the work that's in demand. As in my example with the automobile, who knew anything about automobiles when they were first built? Who knew how to repair one? How and when to change oil? Now, we think of those rather complicated tasks as "burger flipping" type jobs. But back in the 1930s to the 1960s, there were no way to do proper diagnostics on a car, and a good mechanic would have to develop their senses to hear, see, smell, and touch to know what might be the problem. And those guys came out of the same group of people who might be the burger flippers. When Ford and GM and Chrysler built their plants all over the US, all those millions hired to work there are not brainiacs by any measure. They were the regular grunts that were no smarter than today's burger flippers. Heck, I'd say today's burger flippers are more technologically savvy compared to those auto workers from back then, just because technology is so much more ever present now than back then.

Employers train workers to do things. They break down the steps and hire people to do each of the steps well. People who were television repair people or telephone installers (back when people had to have a telephone installed in their homes, and the phone was owned by the telephone company), and so on. All those people had probably no more than a high school education. When there is demand for workers, workers will come knocking, and the employers will train as needed. And, if a technology is too difficult to maintain (say, these robot burger flippers can't be degreased easily or require 4 hours to take apart to be cleaned), then some other manufacturer will build one that's easier to clean and have maintenance/customer service workers work just 1 hour on them once a month. If there is a demand for them, manufacturers will build to the need, and whatever is not fully automated, will be handled by humans, as it always has been.

And again, that's just for the primary industry. Growth in a primary industry begets secondary industries to sustain the workers in that primary industry. Sure, you have robot arms cooking at restaurants. But you might not be able to have robot arms do it in food trucks. So humans are still cooking in food trucks, and there will be plenty of food trucks feeding the workers of that primary industry (building robots for cooking in restaurants). The burger flippers at restaurants will move to flipping burgers at food trucks. They might even be paid more because there's no cost for rent.

You ask that "for whom?" and not realize that globally, we have 7.8B people and, aside from children who no longer have to work to help a family make ends meet, more people now are gainfully employed in non-slavery condition jobs than ever before. So the answer to for whom is "anybody willing to work, and the pay may not be great, but reasonable."
 
2020-10-19 9:06:40 PM  
That thing is going to be such a pain in the ass to clean.

Gunk is going to build up in every joint and each moving part will have to be degreased regularly.
 
2020-10-19 9:56:06 PM  

skyotter: That thing is going to be such a pain in the ass to clean.

Gunk is going to build up in every joint and each moving part will have to be degreased regularly.


So a robotic cook cleaning robot is needed then.
 
2020-10-19 10:44:26 PM  

dericwater: I don't eat at fast food joints, in general, mainly because they don't have good cashiers.


I doubt that.  If you really enjoyed the food, then you'd still go.  No matter how shiatty the cashier, your transaction amounts to little more than uttering "number 4 with a Coke" and letting them swipe your card.
 
2020-10-19 11:40:37 PM  

Axeofjudgement: Well ask for 15 bucks an hour for a menial job that has no advancement, get automated. It was like McDonald's switching to self serve Kiosks and watching the cashiers teach customers "and you're just outsourcing yourself".


They have been working on automating fast food for longer than the demand for fair wages. It was a trope in the 1950s, under test in the 60s , it's just arriving a little behind schedule.
 
2020-10-20 3:01:19 PM  
I Love You (Miss Robot)
Youtube 7C9gqh3S6x4
 
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