Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(TreeHugger)   Want a healthier yard and be even lazier at the same time, skip the rake and leave the leaves this fall   (treehugger.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

1098 clicks; posted to STEM » on 18 Oct 2020 at 9:09 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



57 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2020-10-18 9:24:41 AM  
Let's see... SoCal, leaving dry leaves around forever... Smokey The Bear says no thanks

/were it not like that, they could stay right where they dropped mostly and it'd be fine with me
 
2020-10-18 9:40:59 AM  
I use a bagless mulching mower...
 
2020-10-18 9:42:07 AM  
If you leave the leaves then the ground doesn't freeze as deep and you get grubs in the spring. Skunks will rip your yard up in the spring.
 
2020-10-18 9:44:07 AM  
Article actually says to chop up the leaves not just leaf them there.
 
2020-10-18 9:53:22 AM  
My mulching mower has 'leaf shredding mode'.  I usually just use a leaf blower to blow the leaves from the street into the yard and mulch it a couple times.  Then I trim the Crepe Myrtles and run those limbs through the chipper shredder.

Most of my neighbors are noisier than me.
 
2020-10-18 10:10:20 AM  
The city or HOA will fine you.
Because they can.
 
2020-10-18 10:16:58 AM  
Leaf Blower + Leaf/Branch shredder = tons of mulch by next spring!

Kinda surprised about the lack of mention of leaf/branch shredders though. Having a huge terrifying hopper to put things into speeds up the process a ton.
 
2020-10-18 10:31:14 AM  

Cerebral Knievel: I use a bagless mulching mower...


Ryobi 40V self-propelled FTW.
 
2020-10-18 10:48:35 AM  

Anubislg: Leaf Blower + Leaf/Branch shredder = tons of mulch by next spring!

Kinda surprised about the lack of mention of leaf/branch shredders though. Having a huge terrifying hopper to put things into speeds up the process a ton.


I also have a gas powered, walk behind yard vacuum.
It also has a port for small branches.
Its lime what you are describing, except lawnmower shaped.

I find it works best on sidewalks, but the branch port does get a workout
 
2020-10-18 11:03:56 AM  
This so varies by location, but Treehugger isn't exactly science.

Here in the NorthEast our trees are primarily oak. Oak leaves heavily acidify the ground. Without liberal applications of lime each year (not what you would call earth-friendly) grass will not grow.

In addition we have tick populations (ever heard of Lime disease?) that will winter-over in thick piles of leaves, protected from the freezing temperatures that can reduce their population.

This is bad science. Junk science. Get your science from real publications, not from the same places that tell you to make your own soap and hug trees for happiness.
 
2020-10-18 11:07:03 AM  

Cerebral Knievel: Anubislg: Leaf Blower + Leaf/Branch shredder = tons of mulch by next spring!

Kinda surprised about the lack of mention of leaf/branch shredders though. Having a huge terrifying hopper to put things into speeds up the process a ton.

I also have a gas powered, walk behind yard vacuum.
It also has a port for small branches.
Its lime what you are describing, except lawnmower shaped.

I find it works best on sidewalks, but the branch port does get a workout


Yup...  run the riding mower around the yard in circles, mulching the leaves and leaving everything in the center, and suck it up with the Billy Goat yard vac.. the city picks up the bags on trash day.  Hit my neighbor's yard a month ago and removed 3 bags of gumballs for her.. had to wear ear protectors for that...
 
2020-10-18 11:07:20 AM  
See these?:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Comes from this:
Fark user imageView Full Size


I have 3 of these trees in the yard. Filled almost 40 lawn & leaf bags last year, 3 so far this year.

Ain't no way I can leave these to pile up.
 
2020-10-18 11:13:03 AM  
This article comes out every year. In the front I use the mower to mulch. In the back I have a hickory, which poisons everything, so until it's completely bare I have to rake. However, I'm getting a blower/vacuum this year to make it a little easier on my back.
 
2020-10-18 11:24:34 AM  
My township actually comes around and vacuums up the leaves on a regular basis from October through December.

Also, from April to Sepember, once a month they'll take any sticks and small branches up to six inches in diameter you leave for them.  They feed 'em into the chipper right there and use them for mulch on municipal properties and fields.

But for myself, I usually just mulch most of the leaves back for the lawn and burn the sticks in the firepit.
 
2020-10-18 11:35:34 AM  
Gumballs are bad enough... those would probably clog up the yard vac...
 
2020-10-18 11:35:50 AM  
I bought a chipper shredder and I'm going to have enough compost to fertilize Mars.
 
2020-10-18 11:39:42 AM  
I just run over most of them with the mower.  I have a couple of spots where I need to rake, like next to the house.  That stuff goes in the compost.
 
DVD
2020-10-18 11:52:04 AM  

MindStalker: Article actually says to chop up the leaves not just leaf them there.



Isn't there some kind of Fark penalty for showing that you've actually read and comprehended the article?  Fark-heretic!!!
 
2020-10-18 12:10:47 PM  

DVD: MindStalker: Article actually says to chop up the leaves not just leaf them there.


Isn't there some kind of Fark penalty for showing that you've actually read and comprehended the article?  Fark-heretic!!!


-1 for ignoring my leaf pun.
 
2020-10-18 12:13:07 PM  

zgrizz: This so varies by location, but Treehugger isn't exactly science.

Here in the NorthEast our trees are primarily oak. Oak leaves heavily acidify the ground. Without liberal applications of lime each year (not what you would call earth-friendly) grass will not grow.

In addition we have tick populations (ever heard of Lime disease?) that will winter-over in thick piles of leaves, protected from the freezing temperatures that can reduce their population.

This is bad science. Junk science. Get your science from real publications, not from the same places that tell you to make your own soap and hug trees for happiness.


Yep. I followed the advice in TFA one fall and it killed my entire lawn. My yard was a big mudpit that next spring. Might work for some, won't work for everyone.
 
2020-10-18 12:36:39 PM  

Closed_Minded_Bastage: See these?:
[Fark user image image 850x637]

Comes from this:
[Fark user image image 850x637]

I have 3 of these trees in the yard. Filled almost 40 lawn & leaf bags last year, 3 so far this year.

Ain't no way I can leave these to pile up.


We have a big Catalpa tree in our front yard.  I hear the seeds inside the pod prevent grubs.  I usually mow over them until it's time to rake the leaves.
 
2020-10-18 1:24:28 PM  
Had about 30 bags at the end of last year, so we pay for somebody to rake and bag leaves in our yard. We did it the first year we owned the house and it took like 4 days. No thanks. We have a good mulching mower but I'd rather leave the grass a little long over the winter as we get lots of snow. Our lawn is unhealthy but it's not for lack of leaves for nutrients
 
2020-10-18 1:37:24 PM  

Cerebral Knievel: I use a bagless mulching mower...


I love when saving the environment is the easiest thing to do.

/high five
 
2020-10-18 1:47:24 PM  
Never understood the logic behind bagging and landfilling grass clippings and leaves, then spending beaux coup money in the spring having chemical fertilizers sprayed on the lawn.

I stop mowing at all at the end of September. That gives the local deer (over) population something to nibble on during the lean months, otherwise they will strip bark off of saplings and kill them. The first pass of the mower in spring takes care of mulching any undecayed leaves.
 
2020-10-18 1:57:35 PM  

zgrizz: In addition we have tick populations (ever heard of Lime disease?) that will winter-over in thick piles of leaves, protected from the freezing temperatures that can reduce their population.


We have a tick problem here as well, but the worse issue with leaves is stink bugs. To stop them we had to clear all the trees back from the house, and leaf blow almost every day.

If we don't do that, dozens get into the house every night. One year I went up into the attic to get the Christmas stuff, the entire floor/walls/ceiling were covered in stink bugs.
 
2020-10-18 2:00:30 PM  

maxheck: Never understood the logic behind bagging and landfilling grass clippings and leaves, then spending beaux coup money in the spring having chemical fertilizers sprayed on the lawn.

I stop mowing at all at the end of September. That gives the local deer (over) population something to nibble on during the lean months, otherwise they will strip bark off of saplings and kill them. The first pass of the mower in spring takes care of mulching any undecayed leaves.


For grass clippings, yeah, I'm right there with you. I just trim my grass regularly, and leave the clippings in place. But the leaves are another story. I have really poor soil as it is, and we have LOTS of leaves, which will be about 2-3 foot deep in my yard unless I manage them. Mulching them and leaving them killed almost all of my grass the year I tried it, so those we pile up at the curb for our county to collect them in the fall.
 
2020-10-18 2:10:28 PM  

mongbiohazard: maxheck: Never understood the logic behind bagging and landfilling grass clippings and leaves, then spending beaux coup money in the spring having chemical fertilizers sprayed on the lawn.

I stop mowing at all at the end of September. That gives the local deer (over) population something to nibble on during the lean months, otherwise they will strip bark off of saplings and kill them. The first pass of the mower in spring takes care of mulching any undecayed leaves.

For grass clippings, yeah, I'm right there with you. I just trim my grass regularly, and leave the clippings in place. But the leaves are another story. I have really poor soil as it is, and we have LOTS of leaves, which will be about 2-3 foot deep in my yard unless I manage them. Mulching them and leaving them killed almost all of my grass the year I tried it, so those we pile up at the curb for our county to collect them in the fall.


Have you tried getting a seed spreader and a few sacks of lime? Dependent on the leaves (oak and pine especially,) usually it's the decaying leaves making the soil acid. Lime is cheap and can improve the soil for years. Wear facemask and gloves though.
 
2020-10-18 2:26:34 PM  

maxheck: mongbiohazard: maxheck: Never understood the logic behind bagging and landfilling grass clippings and leaves, then spending beaux coup money in the spring having chemical fertilizers sprayed on the lawn.

I stop mowing at all at the end of September. That gives the local deer (over) population something to nibble on during the lean months, otherwise they will strip bark off of saplings and kill them. The first pass of the mower in spring takes care of mulching any undecayed leaves.

For grass clippings, yeah, I'm right there with you. I just trim my grass regularly, and leave the clippings in place. But the leaves are another story. I have really poor soil as it is, and we have LOTS of leaves, which will be about 2-3 foot deep in my yard unless I manage them. Mulching them and leaving them killed almost all of my grass the year I tried it, so those we pile up at the curb for our county to collect them in the fall.

Have you tried getting a seed spreader and a few sacks of lime? Dependent on the leaves (oak and pine especially,) usually it's the decaying leaves making the soil acid. Lime is cheap and can improve the soil for years. Wear facemask and gloves though.


Also, pretty much any state in the US has an Agricultural extension that will do soil tests cheap to free that will tell you what your soil needs. Call around, you might find out "Oh! crap! Was THAT all I had to do!" :)
 
2020-10-18 2:29:19 PM  
Obligatory:

The Dead Milkmen - Stuart
Youtube 71PNZH1OaW0
 
2020-10-18 2:41:06 PM  

tedthebellhopp: If you leave the leaves then the ground doesn't freeze as deep and you get grubs in the spring. Skunks will rip your yard up in the spring.


Yay skunks!
 
2020-10-18 2:44:25 PM  

mongbiohazard: zgrizz: This so varies by location, but Treehugger isn't exactly science.

Here in the NorthEast our trees are primarily oak. Oak leaves heavily acidify the ground. Without liberal applications of lime each year (not what you would call earth-friendly) grass will not grow.

In addition we have tick populations (ever heard of Lime disease?) that will winter-over in thick piles of leaves, protected from the freezing temperatures that can reduce their population.

This is bad science. Junk science. Get your science from real publications, not from the same places that tell you to make your own soap and hug trees for happiness.

Yep. I followed the advice in TFA one fall and it killed my entire lawn. My yard was a big mudpit that next spring. Might work for some, won't work for everyone.


Once moved into a really nice rental home in a town featured in a John Waters movie. G/F took a few days off of work to settle in to our new home.

Came home after a day's work, and she was ripping out the ground cover sloping down to the driveway.

"Uh, honey, that's going to make a major mudslide next time it rains... It's like... bare dirt now."

"oh."

Much as I loved her, she was a bit impulsive.

/ we managed to replant the slope with ground cover before I had to shovel too much mud out of the drive.
 
2020-10-18 2:56:42 PM  

paulleah: tedthebellhopp: If you leave the leaves then the ground doesn't freeze as deep and you get grubs in the spring. Skunks will rip your yard up in the spring.

Yay skunks!


One of those stories you never live down. One evening I was sitting in a lawn chair on a family camping trip in Nova Scotia, and a skunk came out of the woods.

He padded up to me, and started snuffling my ankles...

"MEEP!" didn't dare react. AAAH! TICKLY WHISKERS!!! SO TICKLY!!!!

Then he ran off. "Gallumph gallumph gallumph." Little fat black and white bottom receding into the woods.

To this day, my sister claims my feet were so stinky they scared a skunk. I shall be hearing about that one forever.
 
2020-10-18 3:19:53 PM  
Yea, good way to end up with bare spots on your lawn in wisconsin if you do not rake after the thaw
 
2020-10-18 3:20:55 PM  
I talk my parents into doing that when I was a kid

Ended up causing the slab Foundation to crack

that was in the sixties but they build stuff better then
 
2020-10-18 3:29:25 PM  

mongbiohazard: maxheck: Never understood the logic behind bagging and landfilling grass clippings and leaves, then spending beaux coup money in the spring having chemical fertilizers sprayed on the lawn.

I stop mowing at all at the end of September. That gives the local deer (over) population something to nibble on during the lean months, otherwise they will strip bark off of saplings and kill them. The first pass of the mower in spring takes care of mulching any undecayed leaves.

For grass clippings, yeah, I'm right there with you. I just trim my grass regularly, and leave the clippings in place. But the leaves are another story. I have really poor soil as it is, and we have LOTS of leaves, which will be about 2-3 foot deep in my yard unless I manage them. Mulching them and leaving them killed almost all of my grass the year I tried it, so those we pile up at the curb for our county to collect them in the fall.


I'm in a "minor farm property" here. The wind sort of spreads leaves out over 5+ acres of grass which isn't going to be baled, so it doesn't pile up so deep, and the trees are spread a little thinner until you get into the woods where I don't care how thick they pile up leaves. :)

Already planning for the Arbor Day mailer to get some fruit trees. Used to have pear, peach and cherry trees, plus a crapton of apples. Well, the peach has endured, anyway. Fruit trees just don't live very long even though the apples lived 100 years.
 
2020-10-18 3:42:17 PM  
I've always mowed or just left the leaves because it's easier but knowing it's better for the environment is a plus.  I would much rather spend my resources on other things than cultivating a single non-native grass species just so I can impress the neighbors with how well I can cultivate a single non-native grass species. I really wish we could all get past the idea of a carpet like sanitized yard. It would save us all money, time, and frustration. Letting native flora thrive can be so much more interesting anyways.
 
2020-10-18 3:47:37 PM  
My lawn seemed to invite worms and grubs. This would attract moles. Their tunnels didn't really appear till I mowed the lawn.

I got something like a road flare advertised to kill moles. Maybe it did, I didn't see any afterwards, but it did kill everything in about a ten foot circle. The grass took a couple of years to grow back.
I didn't want to do that again and talking to my veterinary neighbor who said to put some sticks of juicey fruit gum into the tunnel. The moles are attracted to it, but can't digest it and they die of an intestinal blockage.

I had a moral dilemma. That's got to be a horrible way to go, and the moles are just being moles.

So I started letting the cat out. He brought back field mice, house mice, rabbits, snakes, squels and something I couldn't identify, except by the number of teeth, it might have been a possum. After we found feathers in the yard, he got the biggest and loudest bell we could find.

Never saw a dead mole, but it apparently left the yard.

Now I have a serial killer in the house. He only comes in for a snack, to use the litter box, and a warm place to sleep.
 
2020-10-18 4:28:07 PM  
Is the answer to use a mulching mower?  If so, this isn't really news.
 
2020-10-18 4:51:00 PM  

Lexx0001: My lawn seemed to invite worms and grubs. This would attract moles. Their tunnels didn't really appear till I mowed the lawn.

I got something like a road flare advertised to kill moles. Maybe it did, I didn't see any afterwards, but it did kill everything in about a ten foot circle. The grass took a couple of years to grow back.
I didn't want to do that again and talking to my veterinary neighbor who said to put some sticks of juicey fruit gum into the tunnel. The moles are attracted to it, but can't digest it and they die of an intestinal blockage.

I had a moral dilemma. That's got to be a horrible way to go, and the moles are just being moles.

So I started letting the cat out. He brought back field mice, house mice, rabbits, snakes, squels and something I couldn't identify, except by the number of teeth, it might have been a possum. After we found feathers in the yard, he got the biggest and loudest bell we could find.

Never saw a dead mole, but it apparently left the yard.

Now I have a serial killer in the house. He only comes in for a snack, to use the litter box, and a warm place to sleep.


If the moles do come back you can sprinkle a bunch of cayenne pepper powder near the entrances to their tunnels.
 
2020-10-18 5:47:17 PM  

maxheck: Obligatory:

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/71PNZH1O​aW0?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyaK3​j​o4Sl4
 
2020-10-18 6:05:31 PM  
DEVO / Gut Feeling
Youtube Cwx_Qq56YTA
 
2020-10-18 6:16:31 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: Let's see... SoCal, leaving dry leaves around forever... Smokey The Bear says no thanks

/were it not like that, they could stay right where they dropped mostly and it'd be fine with me


I mow mine into my 15" x 15" patch of courtesy lawn as mulching to reduce water loss.  The original landscaping decisions in my early '80s subdivision were so very very stupid.

"Let's put deciduous water-hungry sycamore trees and kentucky bluegrass in a place that gets ten inches of rain per year!"

I've been slowly reducing the patch of grass every few years by adding a new succulent or drought-resistant perennial area.... but that f*cking tree.  Its only redeeming feature is that it has good branches to put up holiday decorations.


/can't wait to rip that dead branch-dropping mother-f*cker out and put in an olive or California laurel tree.
 
2020-10-18 6:18:41 PM  

Closed_Minded_Bastage: See these?:
[Fark user image 850x637]

Comes from this:
[Fark user image 850x637]

I have 3 of these trees in the yard. Filled almost 40 lawn & leaf bags last year, 3 so far this year.

Ain't no way I can leave these to pile up.


Those look like something you might be able to eat in a famine.
 
2020-10-18 6:19:13 PM  
Going through Devo. Who hasn't crushed on an awkward high-school girl? I have, but they probably didn't. :)
 
2020-10-18 6:20:14 PM  
Devo - Girl U Want (Video)
Youtube g4-2onb62y8
 
2020-10-18 6:21:17 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 6:39:32 PM  
and we jumped up on the table, and shouted ANARCHY!

If you ain't got Mojo Nixon then your store could use some fixin!

"Elvis is Everywhere" by Mojo Nixon
Youtube mpb4ZAAP6Z4
 
2020-10-18 6:54:41 PM  
So now that we've summed up Q-Anon and New Jersey...
 
2020-10-18 7:59:51 PM  
STELLA'S BEST LEAF JUMPS OF ALL TIME
Youtube Tu3HN-MmJc4
 
2020-10-18 8:35:56 PM  

Lexx0001: My lawn seemed to invite worms and grubs. This would attract moles. Their tunnels didn't really appear till I mowed the lawn.

I got something like a road flare advertised to kill moles. Maybe it did, I didn't see any afterwards, but it did kill everything in about a ten foot circle. The grass took a couple of years to grow back.
I didn't want to do that again and talking to my veterinary neighbor who said to put some sticks of juicey fruit gum into the tunnel. The moles are attracted to it, but can't digest it and they die of an intestinal blockage.

I had a moral dilemma. That's got to be a horrible way to go, and the moles are just being moles.

So I started letting the cat out. He brought back field mice, house mice, rabbits, snakes, squels and something I couldn't identify, except by the number of teeth, it might have been a possum. After we found feathers in the yard, he got the biggest and loudest bell we could find.

Never saw a dead mole, but it apparently left the yard.

Now I have a serial killer in the house. He only comes in for a snack, to use the litter box, and a warm place to sleep.


Cats are great if you have a farm.
 
Displayed 50 of 57 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.