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(Core 77)   Japanese butter knives: serious business   (core77.com) divider line
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6036 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Oct 2020 at 4:05 AM (8 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-10-17 11:44:46 PM  
I really want to make tiny little butter noodles, now.
 
2020-10-18 4:19:40 AM  
One holiday gift solution for someone who is nearly impossible to shop for.

Thanks Fark
 
2020-10-18 4:21:08 AM  
These are actually brilliant.
 
2020-10-18 4:31:02 AM  
It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.
 
2020-10-18 4:35:34 AM  

red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


Obviously not, as demonstrated by the awesomeness of butter squirting through the grater knife.
 
2020-10-18 4:36:27 AM  

red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


A self warming one would be nice.

/
Heating one over a flame don't work
 
2020-10-18 4:39:52 AM  
Did someone say "Japan" and "knife" in the same sentence? Better believe it's serious business!

ロウソクの黒煙を集めて作った包丁
Youtube zUCEMjhsvaU
 
2020-10-18 4:41:12 AM  

khatores: Did someone say "Japan" and "knife" in the same sentence? Better believe it's serious business!

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/zUCEMjhs​vaU]


Was actually going to recommend this one as it's a bit more apropos (The knife is made of milk...)

カルーアミルクを作っていたら牛乳から包丁が作れると思った
Youtube t557dPspLxo
 
2020-10-18 4:53:43 AM  
Things like this is why I miss Japan (Lived there for 8 years).
Everything, even the smallest little things or processes, are just improved to perfection.
 
2020-10-18 4:56:40 AM  

red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


The failure isn't the new knife. It's the form factor they've chosen.

Also, butter in Japan doesn't come like butter in the 'States: It comes in slabs, as they've adopted the traditional European form factor.

Using giant slabs of butter is barbaric and pretentious. Cubed butter warms much quicker and spreads just fine with a conventional butter knife. No Ginsu butter knife needed.
 
2020-10-18 4:58:19 AM  
when you're in the mood for seppuku, but not in a hurry
s3files.core77.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 5:05:43 AM  
Wait, how does butter come in America?

The article has the only butter I knew existed...although like way bigger here, 500g is standard.

newshub.co.nzView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 5:07:32 AM  
Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.
 
2020-10-18 5:12:03 AM  
Whelp, there goes my butternoodle patent.
 
2020-10-18 5:17:10 AM  
Good link subby. I have more than four pounds of butter in my frig right now and I can verify that something is going on.

Several times in the past couple of years there have been spot shortages of butter in my area and I have no clue what is happening, but Japan is having a butter....... relationship.
 
2020-10-18 5:45:25 AM  
OK. Here is the deal on all this stuff.

As far as butter form factors, I have 2 450 gram blocks  unsalted. That is a pound each. Then for some reason, I have 4 150 gram slabs in individual boxes. Then I have one slightly larger, I think it is 200 grams.

This is way too much information, but if you use a standard US butter dish, you could accommodate about 110 g or a quarter pound of butter in there and you would chop that off in squares. I guess there are butter dishes in Japan that would be a "double wide" like the one shown in the picture, but Japanese refrigerators, generally speaking, would burp and gag on something with that large a footprint.

And the knife videos referenced above are just way out of hand. I think the second one shown is Kahlua Milk, which is different from the milk knife. I guess the last one I saw was one where a knife was made from the sand and seashells in a kitschy tchotchke. There must be 20 videos by now. The point seems to be that you can make anything out of anything, you just need to have.... an ANGLE. I have personally used ice knife technology to make an adhesive spreader. Can you imagine spreading a pint or so of adhesive and needing no tools or cleanup, or even gloves? Use an ice knife.

A fun fact is that Japan has very strict knife laws that are almost never enforced. And they like it that way.

The world is full of possibilities. We have so much to learn from each other.
 
2020-10-18 5:49:13 AM  
The design failure on the butter noodle producing knife is that the user is pushing the knife, not pulling it.

Maybe it's secretly for left handed people.
 
2020-10-18 5:51:44 AM  

waxbeans: red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.

A self warming one would be nice.

/
Heating one over a flame don't work


You should go for it. You could use a nichrome element from a curling iron or an old toaster oven and have it in a ceramic holder for a knife or something.

OR

You could set up a rig next to your toaster or IN your toaster???? to heat your knife while your toast is toasting.
 
2020-10-18 5:53:18 AM  

2fardownthread: OK. Here is the deal on all this stuff.

As far as butter form factors, I have 2 450 gram blocks  unsalted. That is a pound each. Then for some reason, I have 4 150 gram slabs in individual boxes. Then I have one slightly larger, I think it is 200 grams.

This is way too much information, but if you use a standard US butter dish, you could accommodate about 110 g or a quarter pound of butter in there and you would chop that off in squares. I guess there are butter dishes in Japan that would be a "double wide" like the one shown in the picture, but Japanese refrigerators, generally speaking, would burp and gag on something with that large a footprint.

And the knife videos referenced above are just way out of hand. I think the second one shown is Kahlua Milk, which is different from the milk knife. I guess the last one I saw was one where a knife was made from the sand and seashells in a kitschy tchotchke. There must be 20 videos by now. The point seems to be that you can make anything out of anything, you just need to have.... an ANGLE. I have personally used ice knife technology to make an adhesive spreader. Can you imagine spreading a pint or so of adhesive and needing no tools or cleanup, or even gloves? Use an ice knife.

A fun fact is that Japan has very strict knife laws that are almost never enforced. And they like it that way.

The world is full of possibilities. We have so much to learn from each other.


Burn the witch.
 
2020-10-18 6:03:58 AM  
Paula Deen would be very perplexed with the concept of the butter knife. The stick is a perfectly fine unit of measurement.
 
2020-10-18 6:23:30 AM  

A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.


OK. Your surprise is telling you either that you figured out something that 100 million Japanese people do not know OR you need to know more.

Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table.
 
2020-10-18 7:04:53 AM  

2fardownthread: A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.

OK. Your surprise is telling you either that you figured out something that 100 million Japanese people do not know OR you need to know more.

Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table.


and what, pray tell, do michelin stars -awarded for taste and presentation in one specific restaurant at a time- have to do with how people use -or don't use- specific pieces of silverware at home?

for the record, butter "noodles" look oh-so-fun! but a "french" butter dish with room temperature butter is best.

Fark user imageView Full Size
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 7:06:59 AM  

dyhchong: Wait, how does butter come in America?

The article has the only butter I knew existed...although like way bigger here, 500g is standard.

[newshub.co.nz image 850x485]


In the US, butter usually comes in a one pound (~450g) package...
Fark user imageView Full Size


...split into four individually wrapped "sticks."
Fark user imageView Full Size


Of course, we can also find blocks of "european-style" butter that the rest of the world is used to. When I want to splurge on butter, I'll usually get some Kerrygold Irish butter.
 
2020-10-18 7:50:03 AM  

A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.


In my household, corn on the cob is applied directly to the communal butter stick for thorough buttering.  Just don't chew on the cob first.
 
2020-10-18 7:50:25 AM  
Holy shiat, that's cool.
 
2020-10-18 8:23:41 AM  
is that a Hatori Hanzo butter knife?
 
2020-10-18 9:04:16 AM  

red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


You know how I can tell you're not Japanese?
 
2020-10-18 9:08:17 AM  
Used to go to a surf and turf restaurant ages ago.
Home baked bread, butter was the perfect consistency, exactly between melting point and solidifying. Think consistency of Philadelphia cheese.

HomerDrooling.jpg

/the whole meal there was to die for
//never, EVER had dessert there
///after the amazing bread, fisherman soup, cheese and spinach baked oysters and Cajun flavored breaded halibut, we would have laughed when asked about dessert...if we could inhale any air
 
2020-10-18 9:37:22 AM  
s3files.core77.comView Full Size


I'm down for this one.
 
2020-10-18 9:45:54 AM  
Umm my experience is that the vast majority eat out of vending machines or at noodle shops.  This smacks of effete snobbery.

Love me Japanese steel.  Slicing mushrooms with a Spyderco made in Seki City.
 
2020-10-18 9:48:14 AM  

fzumrk: A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.

In my household, corn on the cob is applied directly to the communal butter stick for thorough buttering.  Just don't chew on the cob first.


Try squeeze butter.  Mexicans have perfected eating corn on the cob.  Just skip the mayo.
 
2020-10-18 11:04:23 AM  

fzumrk: A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.

In my household, corn on the cob is applied directly to the communal butter stick for thorough buttering.  Just don't chew on the cob first.


My wife bought a butter applicator made specifically for corn. It looks like a small deodorant stick and is slightly less efficient than just using a fork.

Why yes, it was from Pampered Chef.
 
2020-10-18 11:58:03 AM  

red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


Barbarian...
 
2020-10-18 12:05:07 PM  
Too much "design" for a butter knife.  This one always worked for me.

ehire.co.zaView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 12:11:13 PM  

2fardownthread: This is way too much information, but if you use a standard US butter dish, you could accommodate about 110 g or a quarter pound of butter in there and you would chop that off in squares.


What a standard US butter dish might look like.

Fark user imageView Full Size


/Holds a one pound block if you want to put that much into it.
//I have the one I grew up with after my mother assumed room temperature.
///If your kitchen gets way above room temperature, it contains any liquified butter.
 
2020-10-18 1:06:24 PM  
Thanks for this link, it was interesting and informative on a subject I had never even thought of.  I like those kind.
 
2020-10-18 1:46:34 PM  

red5ish: It slices - it dices! Wait there's more!
Butter knives don't need innovation. They're butter knives.


Let me guess, how do you eat a candy bar? With your hands?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 2:32:01 PM  

2fardownthread: OK. Here is the deal on all this stuff.

As far as butter form factors, I have 2 450 gram blocks  unsalted. That is a pound each.


Small correction, there's 453.59 grams to a pound.  Usually I see it listed as 454 grams.
 
2020-10-18 2:46:05 PM  

2fardownthread: A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.

OK. Your surprise is telling you either that you figured out something that 100 million Japanese people do not know OR you need to know more.

Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table.


Japan also buys about half the worlds designer clothes. They are a pretentious people.
 
2020-10-18 2:50:46 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 4:38:43 PM  
Back in 1988-89 I was a Rotary Exchange Student to Finland. One of the other Americans from my Rotary District was sent to Japan. She grew up on a dairy farm. When we met again after our years were up and we were back in the States she told me that she had trouble finding good butter where she was so she just made her own.
 
2020-10-18 4:39:24 PM  

Chaiselongue: [Fark user image 312x162]


Nice knees!
 
2020-10-18 6:14:31 PM  
Having made biscuits last night, that noodle maker knife would have been awesome for turning the butter into small enough pieces to get thoroughly integrated into the dough...
 
2020-10-18 6:16:38 PM  

dyhchong: Wait, how does butter come in America?

The article has the only butter I knew existed...although like way bigger here, 500g is standard.

[newshub.co.nz image 850x485]



The eastern half of the US is supplied butter in 'sticks' that are 121 mm × 32 mm × 32 mm, and the style for the western half is 83 mm × 38 mm × 38 mm

Part of the American obesity problem is due to the easy access to the butter. It is cut with sometimes dangerous additives and fillers to only 75-81% butterfat, to stretch the supplies and keep butter affordable. If the butter allowed by law in the US had a higher 85-88% butterfat content, similar to European butters, it would be more satisfying and fewer foods available in the US would need to be deep fried.  NZ made butter appears to be between the US and European butterfat content.

Butter is so prevalent that it can be purchased on almost every street corner by minors.  US government food programs allow the purchase of butter as part of a federal basic sustenance program aimed at keeping those with lower incomes, typically minorities, slow, stupid, and overweight.

The history of the US problem began after WWII rationing was ended and the Butter Lobby launched their own war to regain the market lost to margarine that they were quick to point out, users had to 'add color to so it would look like butter.'  A long game was planned, and children were the targets of 1950's ads placed by the Butter Lobby, claiming health benefits, along with attempting to gain more government support with less oversight.  Similar tricks by the tobacco lobby were exposed, the butter lobby has remained very powerful and untouched by oversight.

In the US state, Wisconsin, it is illegal for restaurants to serve margarine instead of butter. In 2011, unsuccessful efforts were made to repeal that law. Showing the US addiction to butter.

Fark user imageView Full Size



Products and patents were created to make access to butter more convenient.  That ease of access led to non-approved uses and even tragic cases of butter abuse.  The powerful Butter Lobby took almost a religion based path creating contests for butter worship through art presented annually in many local and regional butter carving and sculpture events.

Both the drug abuse and vape abuse ads currently running on TV in the US can trace their origin to an anti-butter ad campaign from 1973, that was quickly shut down, and entirely erased from US consciousness, with only a few associated images available to researchers only.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size



Across the US, including social media and print media, there are images of healthy appearing people happily using butter.

Fark user imageView Full Size


It has even become a US dating ritual and common image for Tinder and Grindr users to entice potential partners.  Sometimes it even offered on the first date if there seems to be social or financial gain:

Fark user imageView Full Size



Some 'weekend warrior' athletes sneak it for a quick energy boost, and MealTeam-6 is obviously pro-butter.

Fark user imageView Full Size



Some US celebrities have admitted and shared publicly they have a problem with a butter addiction, to help others recognize their own problems.

Fark user imageView Full Size



However, many Americans will sit down for Sunday dinner with an appetizer of chilled butter sticks dipped in mayonnaise after a full 14-16 hours of television watching sportsball and racecars making only left turns.
 
2020-10-18 6:46:21 PM  

luna1580: 2fardownthread: A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.

OK. Your surprise is telling you either that you figured out something that 100 million Japanese people do not know OR you need to know more.

Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table.

and what, pray tell, do michelin stars -awarded for taste and presentation in one specific restaurant at a time- have to do with how people use -or don't use- specific pieces of silverware at home?

for the record, butter "noodles" look oh-so-fun! but a "french" butter dish with room temperature butter is best.

[Fark user image 479x361][Fark user image 397x383]


Please read to the end of my post and you will see that I addressed both points.
 
2020-10-18 6:50:32 PM  
In for a penny.....

In for a pound....

Here is a butter update. SInce my last butter report, I have found another full pound another three smaller packs in a different part of the refrigerator. I am not going to add all that up formally, but that brings my total up to about 5 pounds of butter in my refrigerator. I swear I am not making this up, and I am starting to get a little concerned with the SO buying habits. Something is afoot. And it might be a Marlon Brando thing.

Now. This will not be a classic FARK thread, but I think I need someone to send help.... soonish.
 
2020-10-18 7:19:14 PM  

2fardownthread: luna1580: 2fardownthread: A'Tuin: Butter knives are used to cut butter. Use your own knife to spread it. No one wants breadcrumbs all over the butter. I'm surprised that this bit of simple table manners never made it over to Japan.

OK. Your surprise is telling you either that you figured out something that 100 million Japanese people do not know OR you need to know more.

Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table.

and what, pray tell, do michelin stars -awarded for taste and presentation in one specific restaurant at a time- have to do with how people use -or don't use- specific pieces of silverware at home?

for the record, butter "noodles" look oh-so-fun! but a "french" butter dish with room temperature butter is best.

[Fark user image 479x361][Fark user image 397x383]

Please read to the end of my post and you will see that I addressed both points.


i did read your entire, short post.

so:

"Japan has more Michelin stars than any country save France, and Italy is a very distant third. The city of Tokyo by itself has about 50% more Michelin stars than the entire United States. I think this has profound meaning if one assumes that human capital is the only thing moving humanity forward.

So I think, and this is just my opinion, that most Japanese people have grokked the bread plate and salad fork. They are just having fun at the breakfast table."


somehow implies that japan -especially tokyo- has the best restaurants on planet earth. according to the michelin star people. except for france of course. why even consider france in the running for the "most loved by michelin" contest? why even bother? just ignore the perennial "winner" from consideration...

OK.

and then you used a fringe word i had to google to tell us the citizens of japan are very, very wise in the ways of the bread plate and salad fork (which are both imports to their culture as far as i know).

so, DUH, the japanese are smart enough to never get crumbs in the butter! that goes without saying!

was that was your implication?

despite the fact that butter itself in an "import" into wider japanese culture -by way of the Ainu people native to Hokkaidō and the europeans- and "butter eater (stinky stinky butter eater)" was used as an insult a mere generation or two ago?

your entries to this thread just read like "japan rules! people in japan are the best! because their food is the best! (except for france)" and your entire "bio" just says "japan".

it's a little weird. but i understand that as an entire country brand new to the fark-o-sphere (according to your about page), you're very excited and want to tell us how awesome you are, so that's OK.

but you have certainly NOT proved you NEVER leave crumbs in the communal butter dish, japan.
 
2020-10-18 7:46:24 PM  
Seems like a perfectly good place to ask, What's the deal with expensive restaurants that provide damn-near frozen pats of butter with their bread?
 
2020-10-18 7:58:26 PM  
I have one of  these. My mother had one. I'm pretty sure my grandmother did. It's cheap, effective, and versatile, much better than the overhyped crap in the weeaboo article.
images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-18 11:00:19 PM  
Chaiselongue:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Ghee, hold the Indian.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
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