Skip to content
Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Japan Today)   Japan overrides fishermen's concerns, will dump over one million tons of treated "reduced radioactivity" Fukushima water into sea. Tritium sushi impresses dates, so I hear   (japantoday.com) divider line
    More: Followup  
•       •       •

961 clicks; posted to Main » and Politics » on 16 Oct 2020 at 10:44 PM (8 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



62 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2020-10-16 6:02:42 PM  
I get it. Any time you start talking about dumping radioactive waste into the ocean it is a cause for concern and certainly less than ideal. we also need to look at what is actually being proposed.

First off. as far as radioactive waste goes, tritium is pretty low on the threat list.  It also has a short 1/2 life (12.5 years ?)    Fukushima was in  2011.
This would be a phased release over 30 years. The article does not mention if this schedule is for the waste on hand now or if it includes the ongoing accumulation.

The plan also calls for dilution rate of 40:1 before dumping.
I would assume the the plan would be, first in storage ( or least radioactive) first out.

As an existential threat to the ocean, the life in it and those that depend on its bounty, this is probably very low on the list.
I would think that micro plastics, industrial- agricultural run off, global warming and a host of others  pose a much bigger and immediate concern.

I have read more than several article about this. That makes my an expert (NO, IT DOES NOT)

I have seen in some form " The release of the water, which has been filtered to reduce radioactivity "
And?
What is the composition  of the filtered concentrate? How much  concentrate is there? What are the plans for that?

/It's just a thought.
//I'm sure I'm  wrong.
///I usually am.
 
2020-10-16 7:09:04 PM  
Too bad they can't extract the Tritium. It is seriously valuable. The last price I saw was $30,000 per gram, and that was some years ago.
 
2020-10-16 9:09:36 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Blinky sushi anyone?
 
2020-10-16 10:45:58 PM  
if they learn fission...there will be twice as many fish...!
 
2020-10-16 10:48:12 PM  
Fleshapoids Nuke the Whales
Youtube ePp1or3beaA
 
2020-10-16 10:48:18 PM  
Godzilla, Mothra meets Moby Dick.
 
2020-10-16 10:52:03 PM  
Isn't there some played out undersea oil well this could be pumped into so that its spread into the environment would occur on a slower geological timeline as opposed to being dumped like a happy hour cocktail after you've been cut off?
 
2020-10-16 10:52:32 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-16 10:53:33 PM  

blender61: I get it. Any time you start talking about dumping radioactive waste into the ocean it is a cause for concern and certainly less than ideal. we also need to look at what is actually being proposed.

First off. as far as radioactive waste goes, tritium is pretty low on the threat list.  It also has a short 1/2 life (12.5 years ?)    Fukushima was in  2011.
This would be a phased release over 30 years. The article does not mention if this schedule is for the waste on hand now or if it includes the ongoing accumulation.

The plan also calls for dilution rate of 40:1 before dumping.
I would assume the the plan would be, first in storage ( or least radioactive) first out.

As an existential threat to the ocean, the life in it and those that depend on its bounty, this is probably very low on the list.
I would think that micro plastics, industrial- agricultural run off, global warming and a host of others  pose a much bigger and immediate concern.

I have read more than several article about this. That makes my an expert (NO, IT DOES NOT)

I have seen in some form " The release of the water, which has been filtered to reduce radioactivity "
And?
What is the composition  of the filtered concentrate? How much  concentrate is there? What are the plans for that?

/It's just a thought.
//I'm sure I'm  wrong.
///I usually am.


A well thought out rational response. I was just going to post "Good" and call it a night.
 
2020-10-16 10:53:37 PM  
What?  Why not just use an evaporator and release to atmosphere?  Somthings amiss.
 
2020-10-16 10:55:16 PM  

fragMasterFlash: Isn't there some played out undersea oil well this could be pumped into so that its spread into the environment would occur on a slower geological timeline as opposed to being dumped like a happy hour cocktail after you've been cut off?


Somehow "radioactive oil spill" sounds like a harder sell to the public than this does.
 
2020-10-16 10:55:37 PM  
Water itself makes good radiation shielding.
 
2020-10-16 10:57:15 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-16 11:00:07 PM  
If it's so safe maybe they should drink a little of it then.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-16 11:04:33 PM  

iToad: Too bad they can't extract the Tritium. It is seriously valuable. The last price I saw was $30,000 per gram, and that was some years ago.


They could probably extract it its just very energy intensive.
 
2020-10-16 11:05:12 PM  
25 million Gallons!
 
2020-10-16 11:06:01 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-16 11:06:48 PM  
I bet this plan got glowing reviews.
 
2020-10-16 11:07:32 PM  
ship the storage tanks to China as a thank you for Wu Hu Flu.
 
2020-10-16 11:08:36 PM  

FloriduhGuy: 25 million Gallons!


CORRECTION...250 MILLION GALLONS
 
2020-10-16 11:13:36 PM  

Trocadero: fragMasterFlash: Isn't there some played out undersea oil well this could be pumped into so that its spread into the environment would occur on a slower geological timeline as opposed to being dumped like a happy hour cocktail after you've been cut off?

Somehow "radioactive oil spill" sounds like a harder sell to the public than this does.


At least then you would see the oil on the beach and know to GTFO instead of going for an invigorating swim that leaves you with a healthy glow.
 
2020-10-16 11:13:54 PM  

blender61: First off. as far as radioactive waste goes, tritium is pretty low on the threat list.


There were a couple of other articles about the water in storage.  Cesium and strontium are or were also in the water (articles were from 2018/2019, so they may have managed to filter those out).  Both have a half-life of ~30 years.  IMO, before any water is released, it should be tested by the International Atomic Energy Agency to confirm what is actually in the water and if this is a safe plan.
 
2020-10-16 11:15:17 PM  

Liquid_Bacon: What?  Why not just use an evaporator and release to atmosphere?  Somthings amiss.


The problem is, you can evaporate the water, but what other non-evaporative compounds will be left over in the form of a now more potent concentrate? Perhaps I am thinking of this wrong. I am sure that the water molecules will remain irradiated even when evaporated, but what of the Tritium? Would that evaporate with the water, or be left behind? Haven't got enough education in chemistry to know how that works.
 
2020-10-16 11:15:23 PM  

blender61: I get it. Any time you start talking about dumping radioactive waste into the ocean it is a cause for concern and certainly less than ideal. we also need to look at what is actually being proposed.

First off. as far as radioactive waste goes, tritium is pretty low on the threat list.  It also has a short 1/2 life (12.5 years ?)    Fukushima was in  2011.
This would be a phased release over 30 years. The article does not mention if this schedule is for the waste on hand now or if it includes the ongoing accumulation.

The plan also calls for dilution rate of 40:1 before dumping.
I would assume the the plan would be, first in storage ( or least radioactive) first out.

As an existential threat to the ocean, the life in it and those that depend on its bounty, this is probably very low on the list.
I would think that micro plastics, industrial- agricultural run off, global warming and a host of others  pose a much bigger and immediate concern.

I have read more than several article about this. That makes my an expert (NO, IT DOES NOT)

I have seen in some form " The release of the water, which has been filtered to reduce radioactivity "
And?
What is the composition  of the filtered concentrate? How much  concentrate is there? What are the plans for that?

/It's just a thought.
//I'm sure I'm  wrong.
///I usually am.


BRAVI BRAVI BRAVISIMI!

/tritium is a pussy isotope

SpaceyCat: Cesium and strontium


Mmm, I'd be a bit concerned about those TBH, because I think they're bone seekers. Never a good thing.
 
2020-10-16 11:18:44 PM  

Ringshadow: Mmm, I'd be a bit concerned about those TBH, because I think they're bone seekers. Never a good thing.


Yep.  Especially in children.  Which is why I'd want an outside agency to verify the components before releasing ANYTHING.  But that's just me.  I'm not concerned about saving face.
 
2020-10-16 11:21:03 PM  

Liquid_Bacon: What?  Why not just use an evaporator and release to atmosphere?  Somthings amiss.


Tritium is a hydrogen atom and is bonded into a form of water. HTO rather than h2o. Thus the tritium never leaves the water.
 
2020-10-16 11:23:53 PM  

dammitbobby: Liquid_Bacon: What?  Why not just use an evaporator and release to atmosphere?  Somthings amiss.

The problem is, you can evaporate the water, but what other non-evaporative compounds will be left over in the form of a now more potent concentrate? Perhaps I am thinking of this wrong. I am sure that the water molecules will remain irradiated even when evaporated, but what of the Tritium? Would that evaporate with the water, or be left behind? Haven't got enough education in chemistry to know how that works.


Tritium is a hydrogen molecule. It's bonded in the water in place of a normal hydrogen atom.
 
2020-10-16 11:32:29 PM  
Don't worry, mask up!
 
2020-10-16 11:42:00 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-16 11:49:23 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-17 12:10:32 AM  
Diluting...?!?!?!

Do you know the difference between dumping x amount of radioactive waste into the ocean and mixing x amount of radioactive with 40x amount of water and then dumping the 'diluted' waste into the ocean?

The difference to the ocean is nothing.  Absolutely nothing.Oh, you do get a small benefit to the part of the bay you actually dump it into.But diluting is basically worthless.
 
2020-10-17 12:16:55 AM  

Trocadero: fragMasterFlash: Isn't there some played out undersea oil well this could be pumped into so that its spread into the environment would occur on a slower geological timeline as opposed to being dumped like a happy hour cocktail after you've been cut off?

Somehow "radioactive oil spill" sounds like a harder sell to the public than this does.


We did once try fracking with an atomic bomb.  It worked, but the natural gas released was more radioactive than usual and the public wasn't keen on having blast radionuclides coming out of their kitchen stove.  The gas was unmarketable, so we only repeated the effort two more times because of course we did.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proje​c​t_Rulison
 
2020-10-17 12:19:20 AM  
So. This is sad. Not too sad. I feel strongly both ways because I am an area resident. I think I have a pretty good mix of people in my community who will be affected in different ways. Nobody really "benefits" from this. It is a step that needs to be taken to get back to normal, whatever that is.

I know fishermen and ocean researchers who are pissed because they are getting dumped on again. They know that the impact is not going to be bad at all. They are much more concerned about what everyone else will think. The hysteria is worse than the radiation.

The locals also know that the hysteria is worse than the radiation. The only people who think the radiation is worse than the hysteria left, and they are never coming back.

TEPCO and the government are not happy that it has come to this. But there you are, and no better solution seems to be forthcoming.

What galls me are the protesters and handwringers in Tokyo who will rail against Fukushima officials and TEPCO without realizing that Tokyo was the main beneficiary of 40 years of cheap power that was produced, at some expense and risk, up the coast. Yes, we have to be mindful of the plight of our neighbors. But maybe obstructionism should stop. Everyone benefits from cooperation.

The good news? The effects will be minimal, and lets just say barely detectable. And nobody cares very much. Maybe that is a good sign.
 
2020-10-17 12:20:30 AM  

jdmorgan82: dammitbobby: Liquid_Bacon: What?  Why not just use an evaporator and release to atmosphere?  Somthings amiss.

The problem is, you can evaporate the water, but what other non-evaporative compounds will be left over in the form of a now more potent concentrate? Perhaps I am thinking of this wrong. I am sure that the water molecules will remain irradiated even when evaporated, but what of the Tritium? Would that evaporate with the water, or be left behind? Haven't got enough education in chemistry to know how that works.

Tritium is a hydrogen molecule. It's bonded in the water in place of a normal hydrogen atom.


The grand total of Tritium produced by Fukushima on-site was 760 TBq (equivalent to 2.1 g of tritium). We're talking less than HALF A TEASPOON of the stuff. In 2016. By now it should be about a third of a teaspoon.  This is dissolved in over 227 million gallons of water.

You're only going to get Gojira out of that if you assume his radioactive mutation was homeopathic.
 
2020-10-17 12:20:47 AM  
See, any other year this would be okay.

But this is 2020, so this is guaranteed to get us kaiju on every coast.
 
2020-10-17 12:36:22 AM  

fragMasterFlash: Isn't there some played out undersea oil well this could be pumped into so that its spread into the environment would occur on a slower geological timeline as opposed to being dumped like a happy hour cocktail after you've been cut off?


Do you want a nuclear BP oil spill? Because that sounds like a good way to get a nuclear oil spill.
 
2020-10-17 12:36:25 AM  
Lucky ducks Dragon
 
2020-10-17 12:40:37 AM  

markie_farkie: [Fark user image image 425x318]

Blinky sushi anyone?


Sadly, as radiation interferes with cell mitosis, radiation poisoning can't create organized mutations like that.

(In The Hills Have Eyes, although they were downwind of a testing site, their mutations were due to extremely extreme inbreeding)
 
2020-10-17 12:56:38 AM  

Rosyna: markie_farkie: [Fark user image image 425x318]

Blinky sushi anyone?

Sadly, as radiation interferes with cell mitosis, radiation poisoning can't create organized mutations like that.

(In The Hills Have Eyes, although they were downwind of a testing site, their mutations were due to extremely extreme inbreeding)


Oh no you don't.  I've seen Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk.  They both got their powers through exposure to radiation, although it was indirect exposure in Spider-Man's case.  It's against the law or something to put lies in movies, therefore you're wrong!

/ I wonder how they got all the Star Trek and Star Wars footage back from the future.
// Did the Enterprise crew drop it off in their stolen Klingon rust bucket while they were kidnapping whales and tampering with nuclear wessels?
/// Or were Doc Brown and Marty McFly involved?  Maybe Dr. Who?
 
2020-10-17 12:59:39 AM  

recombobulator: Rosyna: markie_farkie: [Fark user image image 425x318]

Blinky sushi anyone?

Sadly, as radiation interferes with cell mitosis, radiation poisoning can't create organized mutations like that.

(In The Hills Have Eyes, although they were downwind of a testing site, their mutations were due to extremely extreme inbreeding)

Oh no you don't.  I've seen Spider-Man and The Incredible Hulk.  They both got their powers through exposure to radiation, although it was indirect exposure in Spider-Man's case.  It's against the law or something to put lies in movies, therefore you're wrong!

/ I wonder how they got all the Star Trek and Star Wars footage back from the future.
// Did the Enterprise crew drop it off in their stolen Klingon rust bucket while they were kidnapping whales and tampering with nuclear wessels?
/// Or were Doc Brown and Marty McFly involved?  Maybe Dr. Who?


Although Star Wars was the past, so I guess maybe ancient aliens or clockwork elves could have delivered the footage instead of some future time traveler.  It's science.
 
2020-10-17 1:29:04 AM  

Dodo David: Water itself makes good radiation shielding.


i believe it has to be pure water as anything in the water is then irradiated.
 
2020-10-17 1:36:19 AM  

iToad: Too bad they can't extract the Tritium. It is seriously valuable. The last price I saw was $30,000 per gram, and that was some years ago.


moonshinerecipe.orgView Full Size
 
2020-10-17 1:46:00 AM  
The solution to pollution is dilution.

This looks pretty above board. The Pacific is pretty big.
 
2020-10-17 1:59:58 AM  

madgonad: The solution to pollution is dilution.

This looks pretty above board. The Pacific is pretty big.


And using that same logic oil refineries in Gary, Indiana justify dumping their sludge into Lake Michigan.  That's, like, a lot of water, man.

Come on, I've really got to piss.  Let me piss in your reservoir, just this once.  Please?  Otherwise I'll have to piss into my own water bottle, like Bear Grylls, and then wash it out later when I'm off camera!
 
2020-10-17 2:57:53 AM  

iToad: Too bad they can't extract the Tritium. It is seriously valuable. The last price I saw was $30,000 per gram, and that was some years ago.


Tritium is actually easily available from heavy water reactors, like in Canada. But tritium itself not as useful as its decay product. That would be Helium3, which has a unique medical use as an inhaled contrast agent for MRI lung scans.
 
2020-10-17 3:09:13 AM  
The concern here is very overblown. Seawater already has a natural radioactivity of close to 12000 Bq/m3, mainly from natural Potassium40. The same isotope that is responsible for bananas being slightly radioactive. The water from Fukushima's cooling water is primarily tritium, and once diluted in seawater, would be almost nothing in terms of additional radioactivity. Plus H3 decays rapidly via a very low energy beta to harmless Helium3.
 
2020-10-17 3:24:27 AM  
It puzzles me that anyone would believe a single word that Tepco and the Japanese government say.
 
2020-10-17 3:27:38 AM  
Well it's nice that they're going to put out warning signs before the releases anyway.

l7world.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-17 3:47:22 AM  

mofa: [Fark user image 425x388]


Yes.  I want Godzilla.  The planet overrun by kaiju would be the perfect cap to the year.
 
2020-10-17 3:51:58 AM  

recombobulator: / I wonder how they got all the Star Trek and Star Wars footage back from the future.


Star Wars was a long time in a galaxy far, far away, so the distance might be an issue but not impossible.  Star Trek is the future, and given all the time hoping they did, not impossible to obtain.

Is that enough geek argument for you?
 
Displayed 50 of 62 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



X
  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.