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(CNBC)   Yet another San Francisco company to DropOffice   (cnbc.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Mark Zuckerberg, San Francisco, Renting, remote work, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Dropbox Studios, individual work, one-bedroom apartment  
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898 clicks; posted to Business » on 14 Oct 2020 at 9:20 PM (9 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-14 9:28:08 PM  
And that's how you do it, right down to the June, 2021 timeframe.

You're going to see more companies do this, because, quite simply, Trump farked us six ways to Sunday. The world you remember won't be coming back for a year or more, and many tech companies have figured out that it's the brains, not the buildings, that make the company. The brains can be anywhere, as long as connectivity is maintained, so it's time to push us forward to the next stage.

About damned time. It's just a shame that it took a pandemic which will kill millions worldwide to get us to this point.
 
2020-10-14 9:41:16 PM  

FormlessOne: And that's how you do it, right down to the June, 2021 timeframe.

You're going to see more companies do this, because, quite simply, Trump farked us six ways to Sunday. The world you remember won't be coming back for a year or more, and many tech companies have figured out that it's the brains, not the buildings, that make the company. The brains can be anywhere, as long as connectivity is maintained, so it's time to push us forward to the next stage.

About damned time. It's just a shame that it took a pandemic which will kill millions worldwide to get us to this point.


It's been 7 months and there is still now plan from the government on how to proceed.

Companies are realizing that it's all up to them.
 
2020-10-15 12:37:25 AM  
I'm trying to get my first office job (computer programming) and I don't understand how I'm supposed to be onboarded remotely. I literally haven't worked in an office setting since I was 12 or 13 years old in the year 2000, I have literally no idea how offices even farking work.

That said I know I literally myself I can't be productive at home, I don't even need to drink caffeine just go to unload boxes off a truck at work for hours. At home simply brushing my teeth makes my back ache and eyes droopy.
 
2020-10-15 12:40:18 AM  
Not sure what happened with that second paragraph: I know myself, so I know that I literally can't be productive at home
 
2020-10-15 1:22:00 AM  

IHadMeAVision: I'm trying to get my first office job (computer programming) and I don't understand how I'm supposed to be onboarded remotely. I literally haven't worked in an office setting since I was 12 or 13 years old in the year 2000, I have literally no idea how offices even farking work.

That said I know I literally myself I can't be productive at home, I don't even need to drink caffeine just go to unload boxes off a truck at work for hours. At home simply brushing my teeth makes my back ache and eyes droopy.


I'm an office worker that recently became WFH permanent. Amid changing jobs, my onboarding for my new job was literally filing a bunch of online paperwork and my job had a laptop, screens, dongles etc shipped to my place.

I get up every morning, shower, make a cup of coffee and get dressed in business casual. It keeps me in the work mood and I can't slack off. It takes discipline to be very honest. I'd love to go back and work in an office next year.
 
2020-10-15 3:43:05 AM  

FormlessOne: And that's how you do it, right down to the June, 2021 timeframe.

You're going to see more companies do this, because, quite simply, Trump farked us six ways to Sunday. The world you remember won't be coming back for a year or more, and many tech companies have figured out that it's the brains, not the buildings, that make the company. The brains can be anywhere, as long as connectivity is maintained, so it's time to push us forward to the next stage.

About damned time. It's just a shame that it took a pandemic which will kill millions worldwide to get us to this point.


There's more to building great things than brains and Internet connectivity. I'm with Microsoft's CEO in thinking that most online meetings are transactional, and several times I've benefitted a lot from casual office conversations with my peers. Many of them were/are way more knowledgeable than I am.

When I transitioned to sales I quickly found out that the 10 minutes spent with a customer after the "official" meeting gave me more insight into their thinking, their plans, fears etc. than the meeting itself.

Online works great for "we need to do task A, here are the requirements and the tools for that, let's discuss it a bit now, but just call if you need anything" type of work. Actual innovation requires more than that.
 
2020-10-15 5:31:42 AM  

FormlessOne: And that's how you do it, right down to the June, 2021 timeframe.

You're going to see more companies do this, because, quite simply, Trump farked us six ways to Sunday. The world you remember won't be coming back for a year or more, and many tech companies have figured out that it's the brains, not the buildings, that make the company. The brains can be anywhere, as long as connectivity is maintained, so it's time to push us forward to the next stage.

About damned time. It's just a shame that it took a pandemic which will kill millions worldwide to get us to this point.


Tech companies are figuring out that they can squeeze more profit by allowing people to function outside of an area with a ridiculous cost of living, charging the same rates, and adjusting compensation moving forward.
 
2020-10-15 6:48:31 AM  
Counterpoint: 70% of people working from home want to go back to the office.

The world will return to 95% the way it was once the pandemic is over and the lockdowns end. It may just take a while to get to that point.
 
2020-10-15 6:48:47 AM  

DeathByGeekSquad: FormlessOne: And that's how you do it, right down to the June, 2021 timeframe.

You're going to see more companies do this, because, quite simply, Trump farked us six ways to Sunday. The world you remember won't be coming back for a year or more, and many tech companies have figured out that it's the brains, not the buildings, that make the company. The brains can be anywhere, as long as connectivity is maintained, so it's time to push us forward to the next stage.

About damned time. It's just a shame that it took a pandemic which will kill millions worldwide to get us to this point.

Tech companies are figuring out that they can squeeze more profit by allowing people to function outside of an area with a ridiculous cost of living, charging the same rates, and adjusting compensation moving forward.


That last bit is the scary part, TBH, and they're already starting to consider that piece.
 
2020-10-15 6:55:20 AM  

neaorin: FormlessOne: And that's how you do it, right down to the June, 2021 timeframe.

You're going to see more companies do this, because, quite simply, Trump farked us six ways to Sunday. The world you remember won't be coming back for a year or more, and many tech companies have figured out that it's the brains, not the buildings, that make the company. The brains can be anywhere, as long as connectivity is maintained, so it's time to push us forward to the next stage.

About damned time. It's just a shame that it took a pandemic which will kill millions worldwide to get us to this point.

There's more to building great things than brains and Internet connectivity. I'm with Microsoft's CEO in thinking that most online meetings are transactional, and several times I've benefitted a lot from casual office conversations with my peers. Many of them were/are way more knowledgeable than I am.

When I transitioned to sales I quickly found out that the 10 minutes spent with a customer after the "official" meeting gave me more insight into their thinking, their plans, fears etc. than the meeting itself.

Online works great for "we need to do task A, here are the requirements and the tools for that, let's discuss it a bit now, but just call if you need anything" type of work. Actual innovation requires more than that.


I do love that you're trying to explain the benefit of hallway convos, because you're not wrong, but I think you'd be surprised at how easily that happens all day now, almost constantly, via Teams and DMs.

Seriously, I spend about an hour a day, on average, working with my team in such conversations. It's how content happens - hit a block, ask a question, drag other folks into the convo, get the question answered, and keep going, pretty much that fast now. With fewer blocks of time allocated to dedicated meetings, I have to argue that we now have more, not fewer, such "hallway conversations."

The thing is, I've already been doing this for years. The pandemic simply allowed me to do so with less resistance from people more interested in seeing my face than listening to my words. For a lot of us, the pandemic didn't change much in terms of our working style. It only changed the location.
 
2020-10-15 6:58:56 AM  
I should say "worked" - my latest gig ended on 10/9, when I hit my 18-month vendor wall at Microsoft. They're trying to wrangle a 3-month COVID-19 exception to bring me back before April, but, I don't hold out much hope. (The agency kind of dropped the ball; because of that, they're hoping to bring me back 3 months earlier.) I am looking forward to hunkering down & spending the holidays quietly, at home, until at least January.
 
2020-10-15 8:19:17 AM  
'Permanent' here just means until they change their mind or realize off-shoring now sounds a whole lot nicer.
 
2020-10-15 11:34:19 AM  
As rents drop, new companies will move in.
 
2020-10-15 12:16:42 PM  

FormlessOne: DeathByGeekSquad: FormlessOne: And that's how you do it, right down to the June, 2021 timeframe.

You're going to see more companies do this, because, quite simply, Trump farked us six ways to Sunday. The world you remember won't be coming back for a year or more, and many tech companies have figured out that it's the brains, not the buildings, that make the company. The brains can be anywhere, as long as connectivity is maintained, so it's time to push us forward to the next stage.

About damned time. It's just a shame that it took a pandemic which will kill millions worldwide to get us to this point.

Tech companies are figuring out that they can squeeze more profit by allowing people to function outside of an area with a ridiculous cost of living, charging the same rates, and adjusting compensation moving forward.

That last bit is the scary part, TBH, and they're already starting to consider that piece.


It's not scary.  Cost of living is a consideration when determining compensation.  If your compensation was driven higher than national average based on location, and your new hires are no longer required to live in that location, it's a sensible adjustment to make when they are outside of said area of increased cost.
 
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