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(Fark)   Farkers who have dealt with floods, help. My house is under water after Hurricane Delta. Never flooded before. House likely is a loss, considering damage already done by Hurricane Laura. Any tips on what to be aware of or expect?   (fark.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Flood, Tropical cyclone, River, Insurance, National Flood Insurance Program, contest theme, Hydrology, Dam  
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1437 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Oct 2020 at 3:35 PM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
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2020-10-11 12:50:09 PM  
48 votes:
You cannot take too many pictures of the damage. Do not hire people that just show up at your door. Do not pay more than 10% of quote upfront. Ask to pay on completion. Have your insurance certificate and policy.
 
2020-10-11 3:02:30 PM  
45 votes:
Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.
 
2020-10-11 3:43:06 PM  
40 votes:
Here's a copy and paste from a local insurance agent in Nola. It's all great advice.

To the evacuees returning from the storm.  Like many, I worked through the aftermath of Katrina and wanted to give some advice. This is not an exhaustive list but things to think about before heading back.
1.) It is now a marathon not a sprint.  Everything is going to move slowly.  Traffic, lines at gas stations, grocery stores, etc.
2.) Before you head back pick up these supplies: 
a. Tires- fix a flat. Debris will be all over the road not just from the storm damage but for weeks and months as contractors move debris across the area to dumpsites. Put in your budget the cost of a new tire.  The tire repair shops will be overloaded expect it to take a while.
b. Hand sanitizer but also anti-bacterial cream and ointments.  If you are going through flooded areas, all sorts of decaying matter will be in the water and open cuts and sores are the entry way for bacterial diseases. Lost a friend to a Blood disease he picked up after trudging through Katrina waters.
c. Work gloves. Heavy duty work gloves are a must. Get a few pair before heading back.
d. Gas cans. They will be in short supply back home. You may need some gas just to get back out of the area.  Utility companies and emergency response teams try and power up the grid along major thoroughfares which can get the gas stations up but getting fuel deliveries to certain areas will take time.
e. Wet wipes - this will be your bath, shower, only way to clean your hands sometimes.  
f. Toilet paper and Paper towels.
g. Water. Drinking water will be in short supply.
h. Rope, twine, ratchet straps and duct tape.
i. Some empty boxes to put things in you want to bring back.
j. Plenty of garbage bags.
k.      Food. Fast food and grocery stores may not be open for long while.
l. Ice. 
3.) Insurance issues:
a. Most insurance companies learned from Katrina they probably already have your file pre-loaded for a potential claim due to the location.
b. Adjusters will be in high demand and they will be on the way as soon as the way is clear and safe.
c. Some people who have nowhere to live, may get serviced before the person who has a damaged, but complete roof over their head.  This is how it should be. Wait your turn. It is a marathon not a sprint.
d. Keep all receipts. If you must buy something to keep the house from further damage, those cost can go towards your deductible.
e. Take plenty of pictures before you start repairs.
f. If you must tear out the house flooring. Keep small pieces of flooring, carpet, molding, etc. to show the adjuster as proof to the kind of quality you had in the house.
4.) Contractors:
a. Do not pay a contractor in cash up front.  You are going to be desperate for things to get done right away. Fight the urge to pay cash up front to any contractor.  There are some evil people in this world who prey on people in times like these.  They collect cash, do a little work, and leave in the middle of the night. The La. State board of contractors has a great brochure here: http://www.lslbc.louisiana.gov/wp-cont​ent/uploads/brochure.pdf
b. If you do hire a contractor get a copy of his certificate of insurance up front.  Make sure he has at a minimum General Liability and Workers Compensation insurance. If the form looks off, white out, missing dates, different fonts in filled in areas, call the agent on the form and verify if the insurance is still in effect. Ask questions and be prepared to wait for a licensed contractor...it is a marathon not a sprint.
5.) Communication:
a. If you can find one bring a battery-operated radio. Cell towers will be hit or miss, and texting will be intermittent as more people come back to the area.
b. Bring a battery back-up for your electronics.
c. Let someone know where you are going and when to expect you back. Watch your time when you get back and check in regularly. Time does weird things after a storm it speeds and slows with no rhyme or reason. one second you're thinking about lunch the next the sun is going down.
Take a break from clean-up and the devastation occasionally.  Go visit a friend or neighbor, lend a helping hand. 
You will see a tremendous outpouring of support from your fellow humans. There will be no gender, race, political or other dividers. Rich and Poor will be standing in the same long lines for gas , ice and water.  People will just be helping people. That is how it should be.
 
2020-10-11 12:51:43 PM  
33 votes:
Expect to get f*cked by your insurance company.

If its overland flooding, then almost certainly only federal flood insurance will cover it.
 
2020-10-11 12:52:27 PM  
25 votes:

itsdan: Does your homeowners insurance cover floods?


Homeowners almost never covers floods. You have to buy flood insurance separately.

I really hope you have flood insurance, subby.
 
2020-10-11 1:00:08 PM  
18 votes:
Oh, and if you weren't in a designated flood plain before and thus not eligible to purchase flood insurance you may rest assured that now you are and will be forced to but flood insurance.
 
2020-10-11 12:49:44 PM  
16 votes:
Sorry for your loss. Photos and line items of things you lost help your insurance figure out value of items lost. The more time/effort you spend, the more money you can get back. At least that's how my motorcycle crash worked.
 
2020-10-11 4:03:09 PM  
15 votes:
I don't know if this will help you specifically, but might help somebody.
For mold growing in walls, commercial ozone generators can be rented cheap, and work like a miracle.

I used to do apartment maintenance. Had a one bedroom apt, on a slab floor. Woman lived there for 5 years with 3 full sized pit bulls. She didn't let them out very often. The unit stank so bad, it burnt your eyes. Ripped up the carpet & padding, washed the walls & concrete floor with bleach, vinegar, soap, enzymatic pet odor remover. It still stank bad. Figured the urine had wicked into the walls. We were talking about tearing the drywall off & reframing some of the walls. One of my suppliers suggested a commercial ozone generator. It was like $25 per day to rent. Used it for 48 hours. Smelled like a swimming pool in there. Let it air out for a couple days, no urine smell. Apparently, it kills all mold, bacteria and things that cause bad odors, even inside the wall cavities.
 
2020-10-11 2:33:58 PM  
14 votes:

itsdan: Does your homeowners insurance cover floods?


Homeowners insurance never covers flood. Flood insurance is national and a seperate policy required.

Got that?
 
2020-10-11 12:57:30 PM  
14 votes:

eurotrader: You cannot take too many pictures of the damage. Do not hire people that just show up at your door. Do not pay more than 10% of quote upfront. Ask to pay on completion. Have your insurance certificate and policy.


This. Pictures and a video walkthrough.  Millions of pictures.  Right down to the content of your refrigerator and freezer.
 
2020-10-11 2:42:54 PM  
13 votes:
Homeowners doesn't cover floods, as has been covered here. But depending on how well insured the contents were, that may get you started on rebuilding.


Contact fema. Then do it again, at least once a week. They are slow as hell but usually, eventually , they come through.

Remember that water seeps. I believe the rule is remove 3 ft of drywall above the high water line.

I'm really sorry. Ive been there, and it sucks.
 
2020-10-11 12:52:12 PM  
13 votes:
Mud and vermin.
Is the foundation concrete or just piers of unsecured block?
How much of the wood is Cypress? That stuff doesn't rot, so those parts are reuseable - assuming you can afford to rebuild.

VERY sorry for the financial hit in any case.
 
2020-10-11 3:59:01 PM  
12 votes:
Expect the process to last about 2 years to resolve, and expect everyone from the contractors and insurance company to be bad actors.  Don't let them tell you you're not owed loss of use, if you can be out there when the adjuster visits (get an independent estimate as well because the person the insurance company sends is a crook and will comically lowball the repair cost), and find a lawyer to potentially hire if it comes to it.  Don't get a public adjuster as they charge 10% and are completely worthless.  If your state allows assignment of benefits (AOBs) to the contractor DO NOT SIGN ONE.  Document everything in writing and keep records.  You're in for a long and absurd process.  Sorry it's not more positive advice but it's realistic.  Good news is that it will end.
 
2020-10-11 1:02:02 PM  
12 votes:
I'm useless as far as advice is concerned but I am really sorry you're going through this. I hope you have a safe place to stay while you are dealing with this.
 
2020-10-11 12:46:52 PM  
12 votes:
Does your homeowners insurance cover floods?
 
2020-10-11 4:05:57 PM  
11 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.


As much as you may love the house, it might be time to consider cutting your losses and joining the climate refugees earlier rather than later. Those rates certainly won't be getting any cheaper.
 
2020-10-11 12:58:21 PM  
11 votes:

itsdan: Does your homeowners insurance cover floods?


It never covers flooding from the surface, only water damage from seepage due to rain or ice melt.

weddingsinger: Expect to get f*cked by your insurance company.


Ubfortunately subby, this is the correct answer.

Get everything wet pulled out and arrange what can be salvaged to dry and what cannot in a dump pile. Get the structure dry as soon as possible and line up an HVAC person as soon as you can to get the systems inspected and ready to be fired back up asap.

You can rest assured that if you do not have federal flood insurance you are totally f@cked. If you do have true flood insurance you might be okay depending on your policy.
 
2020-10-11 4:01:34 PM  
10 votes:
If the drywall got wet, expect to replace all of that. Carpets and pads, too. If you have electricity, get some air movers working in all the rooms exposed to floodwaters, and open all the doors and windows. The furniture might be salvageable, depending on how it's constructed. Depending on how long the floodwaters were in contact with any wood structures (framing, joists, etc), those may also need replacement. For many houses, that's probably at the "tear-down" point.

Your insurance company is almost certainly going to try to fark you over, so document everything, using photos and hand-written chronology of events. Get the name of EVERY SINGLE PERSON you speak to at your insurance, any estimates for repair work, and your local government: names, dates, times, and brief description of what was discussed. No matter the provocation (there will absolutely be provocation), try to avoid yelling at anyone. Count on insurance taking their own sweet time to actually pay you for anything (it took almost 8 months after my house flooded in South Texas back in 2001).
 
2020-10-11 3:30:59 PM  
10 votes:

bayoukitty: The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


Well at least you're not underwater on a mortgage....

Family and pets safe. That's the main thing. Stuff can be replaced.
 
2020-10-11 12:55:53 PM  
10 votes:
I got nothing for you in terms of advice, but stay strong.  You'll get through it and rebuild your lives.  In the meantime, it's going to suck.
 
2020-10-11 1:13:50 PM  
9 votes:
Storm damage is covered by insurance but not flood damage. If the structure has evidence of storm damage document it immediately. Is the roof damaged or tree limbs through the walls? Any pay out from your insurance company can help.
 
2020-10-11 12:51:19 PM  
9 votes:

eurotrader: You cannot take too many pictures of the damage. Do not hire people that just show up at your door. Do not pay more than 10% of quote upfront. Ask to pay on completion. Have your insurance certificate and policy.


All this, and it will take 5x longer than originally expected.
 
2020-10-11 4:55:03 PM  
7 votes:
I'd add different advice on the fridge.

If you can safely get to it and remove, bag and photograph, do so, as said "now now now". BUT ...

If there is a delay of a few days in getting back to the property and the fridge has been there in heat, esp if partly submerged, then DO NOT OPEN IT. Tape it so it can't open when it is moved and toss it in the manner required by local rules.

This advice comes via stories from my brother-in-law, a landlord post Katrina in NOLA learning this the hard way.
 
vpc
2020-10-11 4:13:46 PM  
7 votes:
Clean anything perishible out of the fridge and freezer, and bag it out to the curb, now now now. You're going to want to get in there a LOT less after that fish that thawed out has been sitting for a week. And if the rats and raccoons are poking around in the bags at the curb, at least they're not in the house.
 
2020-10-11 3:43:11 PM  
7 votes:
As soon as the water goes down, rent as many high powered fans/blowers as you can. Other folk will have the same plan, so prepare accordingly.

A good reference:  https://topwindowfans.com/how-to-dry​-y​our-home-after-water-damage/

After that, a good, independent home inspector to isolate the main trouble areas and a general contractor you can trust.

Sorry for your luck, subby.
 
2020-10-11 3:25:17 PM  
7 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


I'm so sorry. Document everything. Write down the names of the insurance people you speak with and the date, same goes for FEMA. Im glad youre all safe
 
2020-10-11 4:47:01 PM  
6 votes:

bayoukitty: She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates.


People make mistakes. Your focus now is to immediately tear the house down to the studs, because it needs to dry out or you'll get mold, and your other project is to secure a construction loan to rebuild. Don't count on FEMA. Look into getting a cheap RV or trailer to live in, and if the area is declared a toxic disaster, yes you will need to park that RV or trailer somewhere else because you can't be living there and get your cleanup money at the same time.

Hopefully your state will come through for you. Just get things going now, and if any disaster money comes later, you can put that toward your debts and loans.
 
2020-10-11 4:08:49 PM  
6 votes:
If you are capable, gut the place yourself as soon as the water drops.

The sooner the wood starts to dry, the better chance you have of salvaging the structure.

Not sure what the adjuster is up to with 'unseen structural damage...' , but that's all the money you are getting from insurance. And it isn't coming soon, so get liquid (phrasing!).

Empty the place first, with an eye toward salvaging waterproof stuff, then mud and carpet, then drywall/plaster.
Get a 5 and 20 pound sledge while the store still has them. Harbor Freight hammers are fine for demo.

If Basement then generator and sump-pump. Generator, if possible, in any case. You'll want lights.

Generators, sump-pumps, shovels and even demo hammers are going to be hard to find locally. If away anyhow get them and bring them back with you.

Document everything. Put a camera on your hat. Also wear a hat when things are shiatty.

Bring: A camp stove, a kettle, a French press, many pounds of your coffee, Irish Whisky, canned vanilla whipped cream, bacon and a 12 gauge.
You could be 'camping' for weeks. Bring the rest of your backpack pack too.

If the water is still rising, it might not be too late for 'the lighter'. It's truly amazing the number of structures that catch fire right as a flood is approaching. Power is out and people make mistakes with candles.
 
2020-10-11 4:02:38 PM  
6 votes:
From an email exchange a few years ago:

I am just a collections manager at a small local history museum in the Southwest, so I would default to any recommendations from Peter Brothers.  With that said, I would recommend reading the Northeast Document Conservation Center's texts on archival salvaging:

https://www.nedcc.org/free-resources/p​reservation-leaflets/3.-emergency-mana​gement/3.7-emergency-salvage-of-wet-ph​otographs

https://www.nedcc.org/free-resources/p​reservation-leaflets/3.-emergency-mana​gement/3.8-emergency-salvage-of-moldy-​books-and-paper

I am assuming that these photographs are personal photographs and not a part of an archival collection, so the best standards and practices for the archival and museum field would be unnecessary.  I would say it is safe to return photographs to their housing once they feel completely dry.  That might take a few days or a week, but it entirely depends on the surrounding environment and how conducive it is to drying wet items.  You just have to check them regularly until they are no longer wet as it is entirely subjective.  Once they are dry, I would suggest (1) storing them in individual sleeves instead of albums, which would minimize damage and spread should mold colonies develop, and (2) keeping them in as dry and cold environment as you can manage.  If you cannot store them in individual sleeves, then acid-free tissue paper would be good for separating the individual photographs.  There are archival vendors that sell acid-free paper, but I believe Hobby Lobby sells it to in their scrap-booking sections, and Walmart might sell it too as they are branching into craft supplies in some of their stores.  Mold colonies can develop on them even if they are dry, because humid air will allow them to develop.  Keeping them separate from photographs that did not get wet would be a good idea, and a store-purchased desiccant kept in their storage should help reduce the risk of mold.  If you can find digital thermometers with hygrometers, I would recommend keeping one in the specific location where you keep the photographs to watch the humidity, and either keep Damp-Rid type desiccants or a dehumidifier in that room.  Be sure to check them on a regular basis.
For future floods, NEDCC and other organizations have advice on how to freeze items that got wet.  That is also a good practice for small non-replaceable items with visible mold or obvious insect infestation.I strongly advise wearing safety gear when around these items.  Mold colonies are irritants, as are mold spores in the air.  If you can smell something musty, then you must wear a mask around the area until you remove the source of trouble.  If you find mold colonies developing, then you might want to buy protective coveralls as well.  The same goes for anything else in a house or building.  Your health is far more important than any photograph.


Email two:
At a museum, a photograph collection should be at 65 degrees or lower, with a non-fluctuating relative humidity of between 40%-50%.  For your purposes, I would just try to keep them under 72 degrees with a low relative humidity.  The cool air will deter mold growth.  As for killing mold, bleach is an excellent and thorough biocide, but I believe concentrated Lysol will also kill mold as well.  I could not tell you how effective it is, but I know some bottles are advertised as such.

Email three (products to use when trying to dry out and flatten photographs/papers):
It should be safe to store them temporarily with wax paper.  Wax paper is used by conservators when photographs are frozen, but the wax can melt off if the temperature gets to be high enough, which will damage photographs.  I also doubt that wax paper is acid-free, but in an emergency you need to use what you have, and replace later.

Email four (storing everything after it is dried out and cleaned):
That should be fine, if a bit pricy for its purpose; a 250-foot roll of acid-free tissue paper from an archival supplier like Gaylord or University Products will cost around $100 as as point of reference.  Or you can use acid-free printer paper from Walmart or Office Depot.  You can always buy or borrow a pH testing pen later to verify.  Acid-free paper lacks the acidity found in common wood pulp paper, either through manufacturing it with a fiber other than wood pulp, or through chemically treating the paper with basic materials like potash during manufacture, and has a completely neutral pH.  That is essential, because wood pulp paper breaks down over time; the by-products are acidic and will damage whatever they touch.  Think of old yellow newspapers; the cheap wood pulp paper breaks down and stains everything else it touches, and the acidity weakens adjacent materials like photograph emulsions and other paper.  When a newspaper clipping is removed from a scrapbook, the paper leaves a yellow stain on the surface of the scrapbook in the shape of that clipping from shallow acidic burns.  Acid-free paper, especially paper made from cotton, will not break down as quickly and does not become acidic as it breaks down.  On top of that, wood pulp paper contains lignin, which turns yellow from oxidizing in the air; that also stains everything it touches.  I see it three times a week, as my newspaper is longer than my mailbox and there is a yellow stain on the end of the paper.  Lignin is usually chemically removed from good-quality paper during the manufacture process, which increases costs and makes it unsuitable for mass-market printing use for newspapers and cheap paperback books.  It takes a few years for paper to turn, especially standard printer paper or plain tissue paper, so there is no urgent rush to replace wax paper with acid-free paper; but for long term storage, acid-free and lignin-free paper is the safest.

Email five (last email):
That storage should be fine.  I would advise adding a desiccant to the box, because sealed boxes can create microenvironments.  You should check it every so often to make sure the desiccant is working.
 
2020-10-11 4:03:23 PM  
5 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


One other thing to do is to interview and find an attorney who deals in insurance claims and not rely solely on the internet for legal advice as to what is covered and what is not. Do not sign an agreement with any attorney until you have talked to more than one.
 
2020-10-11 4:01:10 PM  
5 votes:
Rip out any wet sheet rock now; down to the studs. Get everything as dry as possible as quickly as possible.

Bring everything you need; masks, gloves, tools, gasoline, extra batteries, clean water, etc

A million pictures, especially stuff damaged by wind and storm.

Keep samples of anything that has to go so you can prove to your insurance that it was good quality ( otherwise they assumed it was painted cardboard).
 
2020-10-11 4:00:21 PM  
5 votes:

winedrinkingman: itsdan: Does your homeowners insurance cover floods?

If it doesn't, FEMA should.  Mistake a lot of people make is they only cut the dry wall at the high level mark, and replace everything, dry wall and insolation, below that mark.  You are actually allowed to go well above the flood mark.  I can't remember if it is one foot or three feet, but look it up.  You are allowed to do so because the insolation can soak water and rot upwards.


When I had a flood claim about a decade ago, the independent adjuster's contractor went through the property with the FEMA adjuster with a moisture meter.  I had no idea until I see these readings four feet off the ground where the water had peaked.
 
2020-10-11 3:58:16 PM  
5 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


Post a GoFundMe link.  I'll throw in some help.
 
2020-10-11 3:52:53 PM  
5 votes:
Well, fark.  Speaking from a major flood claim experience, I was going to tell you to hire an independent adjuster.  But since your mom cancelled the flood insurance a few years ago, that advice is shot in the ass.

Invest or rent a commerical air mover and use it constantly.  You might be able to find one cheap on Craigslist or Facebook marketplace but these things dry things out a heck of a lot faster than fans.  Here's a link to one that is 3600CFM (cubic feet per minute).  I know it's a bit pricey but wanted to give you an idea of what it looks like.  You definitely one the highest rated one you can find at the least cost.
 
2020-10-11 2:59:02 PM  
5 votes:
Never call it a 'flood'.

It was a 'sump pump failure'.
 
2020-10-11 2:45:08 PM  
5 votes:
I have no advice other than buy beer but I'm sorry you're going through this subby. Hope everyone in your fam came through it unharmed. Start a Gofundme and post a link. I've seen other Farkers do it.
 
2020-10-11 6:26:12 PM  
4 votes:
I'm so sorry for you and I wish you luck.

Massive flooding is a major headache for the home owner. Down here in Florida, a lot of folks don't have flood or any homeowners insurance because of the big hike in rates after Katrina. Those living in flood plains are required to carry flood insurance when they buy the house.

I can't add anything else to what previous FARKers have said but I hope you get the help you need. Especially, try FEMA and take lots of pictures. If you are denied the first time or get a minuscule amount, you can protest and apply again, which will usually get you somewhere. FEMA inspectors are not always sympathetic because that's all they do is walk around wreckage all day and meet grieving owners. Sometimes, you have to fight to get close to what you need with FEMA.

They actually pay attention to grievances.
 
2020-10-11 5:45:00 PM  
4 votes:
I am sorry for your loss and the trauma you are experiencing, but very glad that you and the critters are OK. It sounds like you are on top of things and know about the FEMA process, so you are aware of their deadlines.

I know you already know this, but don't walk around in standing water unless you know the power is off and will stay off. Watch out for snakes, they were flooded out of their homes too.

I hope everything works out well and everyone stays healthy. Best of luck!
 
2020-10-11 5:00:24 PM  
4 votes:

Roman Fyseek: Never call it a 'flood'.

It was a 'sump pump failure'.


Bit of a thread jack: I had an actual sump pump failure in February. I also had the sump pump endorsement. Insurance still denied the claim because the flooding was groundwater rather than water from, say, a broken pipe.
 
2020-10-11 4:54:43 PM  
4 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


Remove all rugs, all sheet rock that got wet (cut 12" above water line), remove any flooring/trim you can, toss out insulation to the cut line. Toss any furniture/kitchen cabinets etc unless it is hardwood it is most likely toast. Get fans in there asap get it dried out as fast as you can, if it is crazy humid put in dehumidifiers or get the AC working. Once it is all dried you can start making repairs.

As other mentioned if you do not have flood insurance, you can try to apply for a FEMA flood mitigation grant. They are sometimes offered in declared disasters, especially areas that have been hit more than once. These grants allow you to repair/rebuild if you make changes to the structure that will help prevent future flood damage (water proof materials on the first floor, relocation of electrical service/outlets, earth work on the property swales berms etc, hurricane rated roof replacement, hurricane rated replacement window etc) I personally helped 2 dozen people in Key West get these kinds of grants and FEMA paid to raise their houses on concrete piles to meet flood elevation as well as make repairs to the water damage from hurricane Wilma. Also contact the Red Cross, they can often assist home owners that are under/not insured apply for low interest Federal loans and sometimes grants to help with repairs.

FEMA money is tight under this admin, I hope you can find some help to get your house fixed.
 
2020-10-11 4:42:37 PM  
4 votes:
If you're going to rebuild on that land you better put it on stilts.
 
2020-10-11 4:25:06 PM  
4 votes:

The knight who says EkiEkiPoontang: If you are capable, gut the place yourself as soon as the water drops.

The sooner the wood starts to dry, the better chance you have of salvaging the structure.

Not sure what the adjuster is up to with 'unseen structural damage...' , but that's all the money you are getting from insurance. And it isn't coming soon, so get liquid (phrasing!).

Empty the place first, with an eye toward salvaging waterproof stuff, then mud and carpet, then drywall/plaster.
Get a 5 and 20 pound sledge while the store still has them. Harbor Freight hammers are fine for demo.

If Basement then generator and sump-pump. Generator, if possible, in any case. You'll want lights.

Generators, sump-pumps, shovels and even demo hammers are going to be hard to find locally. If away anyhow get them and bring them back with you.

Document everything. Put a camera on your hat. Also wear a hat when things are shiatty.

Bring: A camp stove, a kettle, a French press, many pounds of your coffee, Irish Whisky, canned vanilla whipped cream, bacon and a 12 gauge.
You could be 'camping' for weeks. Bring the rest of your backpack pack too.

If the water is still rising, it might not be too late for 'the lighter'. It's truly amazing the number of structures that catch fire right as a flood is approaching. Power is out and people make mistakes with candles.


Always go through your home with someone not emotionally attached to the property  just like funeral arrangements your less likely to be scammed. I know from experiences. Sorry for your loss.
 
2020-10-11 4:05:37 PM  
4 votes:

o4tuna: I don't know if this will help you specifically, but might help somebody.
For mold growing in walls, commercial ozone generators can be rented cheap, and work like a miracle.

I used to do apartment maintenance. Had a one bedroom apt, on a slab floor. Woman lived there for 5 years with 3 full sized pit bulls. She didn't let them out very often. The unit stank so bad, it burnt your eyes. Ripped up the carpet & padding, washed the walls & concrete floor with bleach, vinegar, soap, enzymatic pet odor remover. It still stank bad. Figured the urine had wicked into the walls. We were talking about tearing the drywall off & reframing some of the walls. One of my suppliers suggested a commercial ozone generator. It was like $25 per day to rent. Used it for 48 hours. Smelled like a swimming pool in there. Let it air out for a couple days, no urine smell. Apparently, it kills all mold, bacteria and things that cause bad odors, even inside the wall cavities.


God how I wish I knew about those 12 or so years ago....
 
2020-10-11 3:54:23 PM  
4 votes:
If the waters rose, they often push sewage back through the plumbing. This is important for 2 reasons: 1) you need to clean this stuff up and 2) you might have a small claim for sewage in house due to rising waters.
 
2020-10-11 1:28:56 PM  
4 votes:
Set fire to your house. Then claim on your fire insurance.

/Not legal advice.
//Do not do this.
///As mentioned above clear it out and get it dry quickly, photograph everything and rebuild. Stuff can be replaced. Save documents, family photos etc. Furniture, blankets, carpet etc just throw away.
 
2020-10-11 12:54:04 PM  
4 votes:
FEMA sometimes helps with rebuilding if you build with a level of buffer.
 
2020-10-11 8:42:22 PM  
3 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


Glad you and the animals are safe. When my mom died several years ago, I used Google sheets to track stuff. You could do that for your call logs, inventory, claim submissions, denials or responses from insurers and/or FEMA.

I also used Google Drive to store scanned and electronic document images. That came in handy this week: I got a letter from a credit card company addressed to my deceased mom. They have money they owed her and want to give it back to the estate or heirs. Mom's been dead over seven years, and the estate closed for about 5-1/2, but I had scans of the Will, Letters Testamentary, and Death Certificate that I printed off to mail to them.
 
2020-10-11 3:58:11 PM  
3 votes:
Begin drying process ASAP. Photos from 2 different cameras (in case one crashes). Tear out. Pile at curb. Dry, dry, dry.

Very sorry for your ordeal...
 
2020-10-11 3:57:34 PM  
3 votes:

itsdan: Does your homeowners insurance cover floods?


If it doesn't, FEMA should.  Mistake a lot of people make is they only cut the dry wall at the high level mark, and replace everything, dry wall and insolation, below that mark.  You are actually allowed to go well above the flood mark.  I can't remember if it is one foot or three feet, but look it up.  You are allowed to do so because the insolation can soak water and rot upwards.
 
2020-10-11 3:42:25 PM  
3 votes:
Mosquitoes.
 
2020-10-11 2:29:44 PM  
3 votes:
I believe if FEMA declares it a flood disaster, you can expect to receive money to repair or rebuild.
 
2020-10-11 1:08:26 PM  
3 votes:
Completely submerged or flooded only up to waist high? Did you take steps to protect the property after Laura (tarps)? And can you document that (receipts for tarps, photos before Delta hit)?
 
2020-10-12 5:29:23 AM  
2 votes:
If you had applicable homeowners insurance, this reddit repost from someone who worked to minimize insurance payouts provides useful info on how to avoid your losses being undervalued. It was dealing more with fire, where there is little evidence of what was destroyed, and I'd imagine flood damage is different in that respect, but some of the principles might still be of value as you review your claim. For example, don't list "Toaster from Wal*Mart", or you'll get $4.88, list "High-end Toaster, Stainless Steel, Blue glowing power button"...according to the author, "You might get $35-50 instead. We had to match all features that were listed."
 
2020-10-11 10:48:04 PM  
2 votes:

BlippityBleep: Don't get a public adjuster as they charge 10% and are completely worthless.


This was not my experience. When I hired a public adjuster after my basement flooded here in Michigan the amount the insurance company offered me more than tripled, and he pre-warned me about a few stunts that the insurance company adjuster absolutely tried to pull (trying to get away with butting the new flooring up to the molding instead of removing the molding and replacing it, or suggesting just drying out the carpeting instead of replacing it, etc.). And the insurance company guy had a well-rehearsed air of golly shucks, just trying to be helpful the whole time he was cutting corners and pinching pennies on behalf of the company. If I had signed off on his original estimate I would have been screwed.

Your insurance company is a multimillion-dollar corporation with trained professionals whose job it is to give you the very least you're willing to accept. It is absolutely in your best interest to hire your own professional to look looking after your interests.
 
2020-10-11 9:54:44 PM  
2 votes:

Wanebo: Oh, and if you weren't in a designated flood plain before and thus not eligible to purchase flood insurance you may rest assured that now you are and will be forced to but flood insurance.


No.  You're only  forced to buy flood insurance if you have a  mortgage.  Otherwise it's optional.

I live in a flood plain.  Was forced to buy  flood insurance because I had a mortgage.  Cancelled  it the day after I paid  off the mortgage.
 
2020-10-11 8:22:40 PM  
2 votes:
with power or not...

open up all doors and windows.

 
2020-10-11 6:10:23 PM  
2 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here....



It's really horrible that you're going through with this. Here's a few pointers, no particular order:
1. Pictures- try to keep anything recently taken before storms hit. Even selfies, that have the property in the background, can be used to prove the condition something was in. It's easy to document what condition it is in now, but if insurance comes and says "it was a worthless dump before the storm" you'll have pictures to prove otherwise.
2. Where you're going to stay (I mentioned this in a thread recently)- start thinking about this. Rentals near you are going to disappear fast, if they haven't already. Try out of town friends, even if just for a short time. Also, ask if they know of rentals in their area- sure, it might mean moving a long distance, but it might mean having a place to live sooner.
3. Keep your head about you and consider what you're going to do next. Are you going to rebuild, or move on? Don't rush into either decision, but if the answer is move on, determine what needs to be done to clear the land (you may not be able to sell it right away).
4. Utilities- if you haven't, consider having them shut off. No reason to pay for electric service, etc. for a nonexistent house.
5. Get a PO Box and forward your mail there. Maybe at the post office, but places like UPS also offer them and you can have (Amazon, etc.) packages shipped there also (helpful if you're not staying in the same place for very long). Make sure you change your address with work so your payroll information and benefit info goes there.
 
2020-10-11 6:02:12 PM  
2 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


You've got a great attitude. That's the hardest part. Good luck!
 
2020-10-11 4:58:41 PM  
2 votes:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


So, so glad to hear that you're safe. This situation is scary, tragic and will be an epic mess to take care of. It's OK to have feelings about that.
 
2020-10-11 4:22:03 PM  
2 votes:
Damn, sorry you're dealing with this subby.

I had water halfway up the front yard during Harvey but folks just a few houses down weren't so lucky.

Based on their experiences and what I've seen in thread not much I can offer except condolences. It's probably worst thing I can imagine dealing with as far as property goes. Wish you the best.
 
2020-10-12 12:45:33 AM  
1 vote:
Used to work for a public adjuster. I would say - you don't need a public adjuster, you can do this yourself. Hopefully you have a copy of your policy - it's amazing how many insurance companies don't keep copies of individual homeowners policies. And a lot of times the policies are just cut and paste from older policies, so you have contradicting terms within the policy. If you're detail-oriented and like to read, go through your entire policy and mark every section that seems weird, contradictory, or oddly worded. Or, as mentioned above, hire an attorney. If they are going to pay something out, you need to understand if you have a replacement cost policy or an actual cash value (ACV) policy. Replacement cost is better for you.

Also, don't just take pictures. You need to print them out or somehow arrange them and label every one of them. What's in the photo? What room was that stuff in? You think you will be able to recognize everything but once it's been damaged you will not remember what the sad looking brownish things are in the photos. Everything will look like a lump of mud.

Yes, most insurance adjusters are not great, but, if you do get a good one, make their life as easy as possible by making lists of everything that was damaged. Handing the adjuster a bunch of photos is not helpful. We used to make big binders, divided out by room, with lists of damaged goods, and replacement prices for each item (with Hyperlinks) for the adjusters - maybe there is a better way to do it now? Ask the adjuster what they need. They are now responsible for hundreds, if not thousands of claims; if you make it easier to process yours there is a chance it will go faster and that you will get more $$. Take names, take numbers, if you happen to get a good adjuster try to keep in contact with them.

And - don't forget about the principle of matching. If you have to tear out part of your rug, insurance has to pay for the entire rug if they cannot match the original material exactly (obviously this assumes that you will somehow have coverage even without flood insurance).

Sorry that you have to go through this. Lots of good advice above. Watch out for snakes. Don't open that refrigerator; just toss it. the food doesn't matter. Good luck. You will make it through this.
 
2020-10-11 10:03:21 PM  
1 vote:

AnotherBluesStringer: Here's a copy and paste from a local insurance agent in Nola. It's all great advice.

To the evacuees returning from the storm.  Like many, I worked through the aftermath of Katrina and wanted to give some advice. This is not an exhaustive list but things to think about before heading back.
1.) It is now a marathon not a sprint.  Everything is going to move slowly.  Traffic, lines at gas stations, grocery stores, etc.
2.) Before you head back pick up these supplies: 
a. Tires- fix a flat. Debris will be all over the road not just from the storm damage but for weeks and months as contractors move debris across the area to dumpsites. Put in your budget the cost of a new tire.  The tire repair shops will be overloaded expect it to take a while.
b. Hand sanitizer but also anti-bacterial cream and ointments.  If you are going through flooded areas, all sorts of decaying matter will be in the water and open cuts and sores are the entry way for bacterial diseases. Lost a friend to a Blood disease he picked up after trudging through Katrina waters.
c. Work gloves. Heavy duty work gloves are a must. Get a few pair before heading back.
d. Gas cans. They will be in short supply back home. You may need some gas just to get back out of the area.  Utility companies and emergency response teams try and power up the grid along major thoroughfares which can get the gas stations up but getting fuel deliveries to certain areas will take time.
e. Wet wipes - this will be your bath, shower, only way to clean your hands sometimes.  
f. Toilet paper and Paper towels.
g. Water. Drinking water will be in short supply.
h. Rope, twine, ratchet straps and duct tape.
i. Some empty boxes to put things in you want to bring back.
j. Plenty of garbage bags.
k.      Food. Fast food and grocery stores may not be open for long while.
l. Ice. 
3.) Insurance issues:
a. Most insurance companies learned from Katrina they probably already have your file pre-loaded for a potential claim due to the location. ...


Excellent advice! Thanks! I suspect I'll have to tell my mother more than once to take it slow. She's still in denial about the extent of the damage. I don't think she's realized we're not moving back in two weeks from now.
 
2020-10-11 8:54:27 PM  
1 vote:

Froman: o4tuna: it kills all mold, bacteria and things that cause bad odors, even inside the wall cavities.

That's good to know - I knew about ozone machines but didn't know they were that good. You'd think this would be more common knowledge, as preventative maintenance. I'm guessing that re:mold it's useful for sanitizing an area that got wet once(like from a pipe leak or clogged gutter), and will dry on its own with enough time and running a dehumidifier? If it's a chronic problem and the wood is all wet and starting to rot there isn't really a substitute for opening it up and removing the rotting material or it will just come right back after a while. But it definitely sounds like something that can buy years of time before having to do a renovation.

It's 2020 and we build our homes out of garbage. "Safe garbage, but garbage nonetheless" according to one Farker. Vulnerable to fire, flood, wind, rodents, etc we have the worst homes in human history in terms of durability and resilience to the elements. It's also why home ownership is such a risk. You take out a 30 mortgage on a home only built to last 35, so you better hope that the value goes up with the cost of inevitably rebuilding parts of it.


In the UK houses are generally built of brick. On the ground floor of my house everything below the ceiling is brick or concrete except for the stairs (wood) and windows (UPVC). The floor is concrete, the walls are brick covered in plaster.
A flood would be bad but it wouldn't affect the structure. The stairs and internal doors might need replacing, and it would need redecorating, but would be basically sound.
 
2020-10-11 7:26:56 PM  
1 vote:

o4tuna: it kills all mold, bacteria and things that cause bad odors, even inside the wall cavities.


That's good to know - I knew about ozone machines but didn't know they were that good. You'd think this would be more common knowledge, as preventative maintenance. I'm guessing that re:mold it's useful for sanitizing an area that got wet once(like from a pipe leak or clogged gutter), and will dry on its own with enough time and running a dehumidifier? If it's a chronic problem and the wood is all wet and starting to rot there isn't really a substitute for opening it up and removing the rotting material or it will just come right back after a while. But it definitely sounds like something that can buy years of time before having to do a renovation.

It's 2020 and we build our homes out of garbage. "Safe garbage, but garbage nonetheless" according to one Farker. Vulnerable to fire, flood, wind, rodents, etc we have the worst homes in human history in terms of durability and resilience to the elements. It's also why home ownership is such a risk. You take out a 30 mortgage on a home only built to last 35, so you better hope that the value goes up with the cost of inevitably rebuilding parts of it.
 
2020-10-11 7:05:45 PM  
1 vote:

weddingsinger: Expect to get f*cked by your insurance company.

If its overland flooding, then almost certainly only federal flood insurance will cover it.


That's why flood insurance exists--regular homeowners insurance does **not** cover floods and a house underwater is a flood.  Previous damage is usually irrelevant.  I wouldn't even say it's being farked, homeowner's insurance makes it very clear it doesn't cover flooding.  The people who feel farked are the ones who didn't pay attention to what was actually covered.

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.


You're farked.  The fact that premiums are going up says a lot about the evaluation of the risk.

12349876: If you're going to rebuild on that land you better put it on stilts.


I wish this was written into the building codes.  Your building was destroyed by a natural disaster that might reasonably recur?  The plot gets a restriction on it that any future construction must be able to withstand that disaster.  (Exceptions for expendable non-houses--say, beach huts.)
 
2020-10-11 6:16:55 PM  
1 vote:

fargin a: puffy999: Sorry about that, subby.

My family's experience with flooding (washed the house away in 64, long before I was around) prompted the family to move to a different town.

Best advice! Move the fark out.
My neighbors moved in after Katrina.


Seriously think about moving out.

Find out how much insurance is going to cover - of course doing the mitigation steps other have provided.

When you find out they're boning you completely, or even if they're giving you replacement cost...

Move.  Just take the hit and leave.

It will take so long to get it all put back together.

So sorry you got flooded out in the storm.
 
2020-10-11 4:38:03 PM  
1 vote:

bayoukitty: Subby here. Thanks for the comments. The property belongs to my mother, and I've been living there after Dad got sick and died 10 years ago. She has homeowners insurance, but canceled the flood insurance about two years ago when FEMA began raising the rates. Been talking to our neighbors and learned they did the same. At least we're all farked together.

We had tarps up from Laura's damage, which our adjuster told us was more severe than we imagined. We had unseen structural damage. He did the inspection a week before Delta, so we're still waiting.

Definitely taking tons of photos and videos. We spent yesterday removing items we wanted to salvage. I'll be making another pass today. The water is still rising.

So, I figured we were farked from an insurance standpoint. Still made a claim today. I submitted the damage report to our parish office of emergency preparedness for its FEMA assessment. But any advice is welcome, including "buy alcohol." 😁

The house and half-acre property were paid for, so I'm viewing this as a chance to do it right the second time. Family and all the animals (dog, cats, goats) are safe. I know it'll be frustrating, but it'll eventually work out.


AAAH, GOATS! <3
 
2020-10-11 4:07:58 PM  
1 vote:

sdd2000: One other thing to do is to interview and find an attorney who deals in insurance claims and not rely solely on the internet for legal advice as to what is covered and what is not. Do not sign an agreement with any attorney until you have talked to more than one


It sounds like she's already on the ball.

The most important question was answered re: flood insurance.

AFAIAC, she doesn't need to contact the attorneys unless the insurance people screw her on the pre-flood damage. Which they almost certainly will because of the subsequent flood.
 
2020-10-11 3:50:56 PM  
1 vote:

puffy999: Sorry about that, subby.

My family's experience with flooding (washed the house away in 64, long before I was around) prompted the family to move to a different town.


Sounds line the Xmas flood, we got flooded too

Stay strong Subby
 
2020-10-11 3:43:01 PM  
1 vote:

weddingsinger: Expect to get f*cked by your insurance company.

If its overland flooding, then almost certainly only federal flood insurance will cover it.


No flood insurance means your likely f*cked as the home owners insurance will definitely  try to blame overland flooding to wriggle out of paying or to pay as little as they absolutely must.
 
2020-10-11 2:55:56 PM  
1 vote:

Wanebo: itsdan: Does your homeowners insurance cover floods?

It never covers flooding from the surface, only water damage from seepage due to rain or ice melt.

weddingsinger: Expect to get f*cked by your insurance company.

Ubfortunately subby, this is the correct answer.

Get everything wet pulled out and arrange what can be salvaged to dry and what cannot in a dump pile. Get the structure dry as soon as possible and line up an HVAC person as soon as you can to get the systems inspected and ready to be fired back up asap.

You can rest assured that if you do not have federal flood insurance you are totally f@cked. If you do have true flood insurance you might be okay depending on your policy.


Maybe not totally, if any of the damage from Laura was covered by subby's insurance. The question is whether there was enough time between the two storms to go through the whole claims process. Of course, I'm neither a homeowner nor in hurricane country, so I wouldn't know.

Also, thanks for the unexpected TF last week. I'd just been trying to find your name in a thread somewhere for the last few days to acknowledge that.
 
2020-10-11 1:20:53 PM  
1 vote:
Sorry, I hope it turns out as well as it can for you though.
 
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