Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The National Interest)   Thumb your nose at Columbus and learn about the original peopling of the Caribbean   (nationalinterest.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, South America, Caribbean, North America, Caribbean Sea, Greater Antilles, Lesser Antilles, Barbados, Jamaica  
•       •       •

696 clicks; posted to Fandom » and STEM » on 09 Oct 2020 at 11:45 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



6 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-10-09 9:51:33 AM  
There was a "mummy" found on Vieques, Hombre de Puerto Ferro. 4000 years old, estimated to be near 7' tall.
 
2020-10-09 11:54:09 AM  
Can't you read subby?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-10-09 6:18:19 PM  
Going from Venezuela to the northeast I think you can see Trinidad from the shore and from there the Lesser Antilles form a chain going North. Also the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean kind of crash into each other between the islands so it probably wasn't too hard for the original settlers to figure out where the next one was even if they couldn't see it from the shore.

I'm more interested in the inhabited islands in the middle of the farking Pacific goddamned Ocean.
 
2020-10-09 9:23:19 PM  

IHadMeAVision: Going from Venezuela to the northeast I think you can see Trinidad from the shore and from there the Lesser Antilles form a chain going North. Also the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean kind of crash into each other between the islands so it probably wasn't too hard for the original settlers to figure out where the next one was even if they couldn't see it from the shore.

I'm more interested in the inhabited islands in the middle of the farking Pacific goddamned Ocean.


The ones that ventured that far were just maniacs
 
2020-10-09 10:16:58 PM  

IHadMeAVision: Going from Venezuela to the northeast I think you can see Trinidad from the shore and from there the Lesser Antilles form a chain going North. Also the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean kind of crash into each other between the islands so it probably wasn't too hard for the original settlers to figure out where the next one was even if they couldn't see it from the shore.

I'm more interested in the inhabited islands in the middle of the farking Pacific goddamned Ocean.


Could form above islands.  It was one of the ways the Polynesians knew how to find land.  The long clouds dissipate and get much thinner but can be seen for hundreds of miles at times.
 
2020-10-10 1:12:17 AM  

DON.MAC: Could form above islands.  It was one of the ways the Polynesians knew how to find land.  The long clouds dissipate and get much thinner but can be seen for hundreds of miles at times.


True but I kind of agree with the other poster that it's pretty much a suicide mission. As opposed to, say, just heading due south/southeast from the present-day southeast US, where you're way more likely to actually find the Bahamas or Cuba or whatever.

That said, tfa's argument that the Caribbean was possibly settled from the north down doesn't really make sense to me. As far as I know the small samples of Arawak/Carib DNA we have suggest South American Amerindian heritage AFAIK. The thousand year-gap between Trinidad and the Greater Antilles artifacts with nothing in-between means nothing to me because people probably went from small island to small island northward until they found big islands with a farkton of resources to settle permanently on.
 
Displayed 6 of 6 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.