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(Washington Post)   "Now keeping any part of a library in a glass building designed to be tropically warm and moist is unquestionably a terrible idea." And yet, one book-lover did   (washingtonpost.com) divider line
    More: Fail, The Tale of Genji, Smaug-like book hoard, Last spring, Philip K. Dick, basement's new metal shelves, Georgette Heyer, Murasaki Shikibu, library of a small liberal arts college  
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1012 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 01 Oct 2020 at 5:04 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-01 5:23:41 PM  
Hoarding.  It's and insidious disease of the mind.  An increasingly sickly mind that *if* it first sees a niggling problem, quickly finds rationalization.
 
2020-10-01 5:37:01 PM  
Idiot too cheap to rent a storage locker realizes he's an idiot.
 
2020-10-01 5:41:57 PM  

SansNeural: Hoarding.  It's and insidious disease of the mind.  An increasingly sickly mind that *if* it first sees a niggling problem, quickly finds rationalization.


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2020-10-01 5:42:33 PM  
So nice of him to create fresh soil for the greenhouse.
 
2020-10-01 7:29:02 PM  
How can you claim to love books so much, and then store them so stupidly? Nobody is that dumb, right?

/rhetorical question
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2020-10-01 8:01:48 PM  
Niven and Pournelle had a circle of hell for people like that.
 
2020-10-01 8:25:35 PM  
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$10 for five at walmart.com.
 
2020-10-01 8:25:55 PM  
Every time discussions about ebooks comes up there's always a few people that go on about books not needing batteries, lasting forever, etc. They also require tons of space to store, require physical transportation to get from A to B, are heavy, can't be searched, can't be copied easily, and the list goes on. And here we have a story about someone that attempted to just store only a few thousand books and couldn't hack it. Whenever I hear people bashing state of the art technology in favor of 'the old way' it's damn near a guarantee that they're just idiots.
 
2020-10-01 9:00:11 PM  
Have the books transcribed onto tungsten plates and then launch them into space towards the bootes void.  There, the books are now perseved.  Problem solved.
 
2020-10-01 9:21:48 PM  
Just picked this up at the antique store tonight so I'm getting a kick:

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2020-10-01 9:56:27 PM  

ZAZ: Niven and Pournelle had a circle of hell for people like that.


I think they took that straight from Dante.  IIRC their most memorable addition to Hell were "the people who banned cyclamates".
 
2020-10-02 10:56:11 AM  

Russ1642: Every time discussions about ebooks comes up there's always a few people that go on about books not needing batteries, lasting forever, etc. They also require tons of space to store, require physical transportation to get from A to B, are heavy, can't be searched, can't be copied easily, and the list goes on. And here we have a story about someone that attempted to just store only a few thousand books and couldn't hack it. Whenever I hear people bashing state of the art technology in favor of 'the old way' it's damn near a guarantee that they're just idiots.


Physical books are better in a lot of ways, mostly related to the format itself. Ebooks have searchability and taking up nearly no space, though, which are both big (though I'll take a good index over search any day, if I have to choose only one). IMO they're a complete replacement for linear fiction with few or no "features" (footnotes, endnotes, illustrations) that I'm likely never to refer back to (if I pick it up again, it'll be for another straight-through read). This describes an awful lot of fiction, and probably most of what people actually read for pleasure.
 
2020-10-02 12:20:22 PM  

fallingcow: Russ1642: Every time discussions about ebooks comes up there's always a few people that go on about books not needing batteries, lasting forever, etc. They also require tons of space to store, require physical transportation to get from A to B, are heavy, can't be searched, can't be copied easily, and the list goes on. And here we have a story about someone that attempted to just store only a few thousand books and couldn't hack it. Whenever I hear people bashing state of the art technology in favor of 'the old way' it's damn near a guarantee that they're just idiots.

Physical books are better in a lot of ways, mostly related to the format itself. Ebooks have searchability and taking up nearly no space, though, which are both big (though I'll take a good index over search any day, if I have to choose only one). IMO they're a complete replacement for linear fiction with few or no "features" (footnotes, endnotes, illustrations) that I'm likely never to refer back to (if I pick it up again, it'll be for another straight-through read). This describes an awful lot of fiction, and probably most of what people actually read for pleasure.


See what I mean?
 
2020-10-02 3:10:48 PM  
Russ1642:

So, your position is that ebooks are a suitable, even superior, replacement for any and all books, period? I agree they're a good replacement for entire, very large, categories of books. I disagree that the format replaces all books. You lose too many UI features for some books on an e-reader, and fixed-layout is basically necessary for some texts. iPads can kinda help with some of them, but have their own problems (I do read some books on an iPad that would suck balls on an e-ink reader, and it does OK for those). I definitely hope they do replace all books some day, because books are bulky and heavy AF, which are significant down-sides to them.
 
2020-10-02 8:27:15 PM  

fallingcow: Russ1642:

So, your position is that ebooks are a suitable, even superior, replacement for any and all books, period? I agree they're a good replacement for entire, very large, categories of books. I disagree that the format replaces all books. You lose too many UI features for some books on an e-reader, and fixed-layout is basically necessary for some texts. iPads can kinda help with some of them, but have their own problems (I do read some books on an iPad that would suck balls on an e-ink reader, and it does OK for those). I definitely hope they do replace all books some day, because books are bulky and heavy AF, which are significant down-sides to them.


No. My point is that when people argue that 'the old way' is better than all this newfangled technology they're almost always completely full of shiat. But yes, for the vast majority of books a digital form is superior in almost every way. They all start out that way to begin with. And the UI on an e-reader or a phone is vastly superior to that of a physical book. For art, such as comics and anything with pictures, you may want a bigger colour display so you're looking at a laptop or desktop computer. And that's still vastly superior to a printed book. I'm sure there are plenty of examples to the contrary but they're few and far between.
 
2020-10-03 12:50:24 AM  
Russ1642:

I still prefer physical books for texts where page layout is very important for the text or for features of the book, or where simultaneous access to pages in two different parts is very nice (I find replacements for the latter on digital devices somewhere between worthless and tolerable-but-not-good-the UI for this on physical books is pretty nice). I'm actually skeptical that we'll see widespread use of e-ink readers that are good for these cases, for various reasons, most importantly that "fixing" those issues would probably make them worse for linear fiction reading (they'd probable need a second screen, for one thing), which is, again, a lot of the reading that people do, so that's the use-case I expect the most-common and cheap models, at least, to target. LCD tablets like the iPad fix some problems, but aren't quite a perfect solution either.

Really I think capably replacing most mass-market fiction dead-tree books is a pretty damn great achievement for the tech, and that it definitely achieves. If we get readers that replace more kinds of books, cool. If not, well, too bad, but not unexpected since what's left isn't just niche, it's several different niche needs that aren't necessarily complementary, so may be hard to cram in an e-reader. Some books use an awful lot of features of physical books that have evolved along with the format, and it'll be tricky to translate all of those to one screen-having device, or maybe even to several, given how hard it may be to market such devices and to source properly-formatted material for them.
 
2020-10-03 12:56:02 AM  
Russ1642:

Though I will note I prefer an iPad Pro 12.9" for comics, to the real thing. Screen's big enough to read two pages at a time in landscape, which is important. May not hold when I'm older and my eyes are worse, and I haven't cared for reading them on screens smaller than that (or in a PC, ugh) but that particular tablet is my favorite way to read comics, right now. I'd damn near stopped reading them until I got one, actually, and have read probably 300ish over the last couple years thanks to that device.
 
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